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Old September 4th, 2011, 12:54 AM   #5161
Reteip
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Border Belgium-France near by Moeskroen/Lille

I’m new here, and this is my very first post.
I’ve always been fascinated by bordercrossings. Some time ago, I crossed the Belgian-French border, and went to Lille. A few pictures were taken at the French-Wallonian border, a few at the Flemish-French border. Wallonia (where Moeskroen/Mouscron is) and Flanders (where Rekkem is), are very near to each other here. It’s noticeble that the buildingstyle on the border is pretty much the same. It’s the typical old Flemish building style.



Right on the French-Belgian border, at Neuville-en-Ferrain. When you pass the white sign, you’re in Moeskroen (Mouscron in French).

Photo taken at the exact same place, but turned 180°.

30m further up the road, the border crossing again. The café with the Belgian Beer brand Jupiler is boderline Belgium.

30m further up the road, the border crossing again. The café with the Belgian Beer brand Jupiler is boderline Belgium.

Side road of the main road. This street is 100% in France.

The little street Rue Briand (yellow plate) is French. The white Citroën van is in Belgium.

Last edited by Reteip; September 4th, 2011 at 06:46 PM.
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Old September 4th, 2011, 12:54 AM   #5162
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Border Belgium-France near by Moeskroen/Lille part 2

A km further down the road, you find the Halluin-Rekkem border (=Flanders)
You can see the border when you look at road.The street that runs trough Flanders is called the Donkaardstraat, in France it’s calld Rue Du Dronkaerd, a ‘translation’.

Picure taken in Rekkem, facing Neuville-en-Ferrain/Halluin.


This lighting is situated exactly on the border. The yellow house is France, the red one Belgium.

France has placed a ‘no garbage dropping here’-sign ,100 meter futher down the road, both in French and Dutch. Notice the advertisement of the French beerbrand 1664, that is almost unknown in Belgium.

The cottage and darkgrey Renault and light grey Peugeot are still france.

Photo taken on the bridge over the highway Kortrijk-Lille. A bit futher we can see the border crossing in Rekkem. The French sign only shows Belgian cities.

Same bridge, now facing Rijsel/Lille.

Border crossing France-Belgium from the highway.

Back in Belgium



Last edited by Reteip; September 4th, 2011 at 01:32 AM.
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Old September 4th, 2011, 01:00 AM   #5163
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Welcome! Interesting pictures. In the UK that beer is known as Kronenbourg 1664
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Old September 4th, 2011, 01:12 AM   #5164
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How they did at this town split between France and Belgium before Schengen?
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Old September 4th, 2011, 01:01 PM   #5165
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Nice pics!

Quote:
Donkaardstraat
I thought in Flanders the street name is also the "Dronckaertstraat".
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Old September 4th, 2011, 01:29 PM   #5166
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Daviedoff View Post
Nice pics!



I thought in Flanders the street name is also the "Dronckaertstraat".
You are right! It's indeed 'Drockaertstraat' in Menen. http://en.mappy.com/#d=dronkaardstraat,+menen&p=map

Dronckaert is probably the old Flemish word.
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Old September 4th, 2011, 02:58 PM   #5167
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Portugal/Galiza border

[IMG]http://i56.************/fascuw.jpg[/IMG]

[IMG]http://i55.************/v8j1jo.jpg[/IMG]

[IMG]http://i54.************/4rt1qc.jpg[/IMG]

[IMG]http://i53.************/wi3g3n.jpg[/IMG]

[IMG]http://i56.************/11j88qs.jpg[/IMG]

[IMG]http://i51.************/orqoex.jpg[/IMG]

http://maps.google.pt/maps?q=Portela...src=6&t=h&z=16
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Old September 4th, 2011, 04:20 PM   #5168
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What's with all the graffiti?
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Old September 4th, 2011, 04:26 PM   #5169
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Fatfield View Post
What's with all the graffiti?
Galician Nationalism and Pro-Portuguese
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Old September 4th, 2011, 05:36 PM   #5170
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Reteip View Post
You are right! It's indeed 'Drockaertstraat' in Menen. http://en.mappy.com/#d=dronkaardstraat,+menen&p=map

Dronckaert is probably the old Flemish word.
Does it mean the same thing as "drunkard" (a habitual drunk) in English?
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Old September 4th, 2011, 06:42 PM   #5171
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Penn's Woods View Post
Does it mean the same thing as "drunkard" (a habitual drunk) in English?
Yes indeed! A lot of dutch/flemish words seems like english.

Quote:
Originally Posted by italystf View Post
How they did at this town split between France and Belgium before Schengen?
Probably with border controls.
I remember border controles 10 years ago on the border between Luxembourg-France (after Schengen).
Actualy: on the Belgian-French border on the highway, there is still (sometimes) controls (for youth French people who visited The Netherlands for the flowers, mills and maybe the weed).

@Costa: scary abandoned borderbuilding in Portugal! Thanks for posting. Keep up posting.

Last edited by Reteip; September 4th, 2011 at 06:56 PM.
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Old September 4th, 2011, 07:13 PM   #5172
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Nădlac / Nagylak (Romania / Hungary) border crossing:





Hungarian side (where is the actual check):



Hungary:

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Old September 4th, 2011, 08:09 PM   #5173
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The blog about the Portuguese-Spanish border hasn't been updated recently . When it its I'll show you as normal
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Old September 7th, 2011, 08:44 PM   #5174
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Funny!!! There's a Mexico and a New Mexico
Quote:
Originally Posted by ChrisZwolle View Post
You just found out?
UGH! He isn't the only one. I was in New Mexico last month and my brother called and asked where I was. I said on vacation in New Mexico. My brother replies: "Theres a New one???"
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Old September 7th, 2011, 09:33 PM   #5175
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Hanno1983 View Post
You wrote about Alsace-Lorraine. French assimilation-strategy succeeded because most Alsatians in their hearts felt French culture more modern than German one. They didn't plan to become French speaking. But they did more and more.
What about an alternative narrative: after 150 years of oppression and settlement by Austrians, Italians liberated themselves and, after driving the enemy away, were keen enough to let the innocent civilians stay in stolen lands, despite the fact Austrian soldiers killed more than 600.000 Italians when they already knew their empire was gone.


Quote:
Same problem was in Poland with German minority between WWI and WWII. If Silesians would have been allowed to stay after 1945 Poland would have got a very big problem at the latest in 1989.
So my thesis is that "peaceful" assimilation is only possible if a major part of minority accept majority culture as attractive. Otherwise only forced assimilation or forced moving is possible. Both are no solutions for democratic governments.
Different situations. Poland was treated as as a victim of war, whilst Italy and Austria were treated as lesser evil defeated countries. Had Italy not surrender ed in 1943, I'm sure many other Italian territories would be lost to France, probably some to Austria and much to Yugoslavia. But to have not surrendered in 1943 would be an immense mistake, and it is impossible to predict any larger scale consequences that would have ensued. (Many people, to this day, still ignores the fact and forget that all resistance from 1943 onward was mounted by German under, at best, non-cooperative occupation but usually outright hostility).

In that sense, Italy was somehow fortunate to have lost only Dalmatia, Istria and some areas in the Piemontese Alps to France, compared to what happened to Germany which saw its territory shrink and be divided into occupation zones.

Quote:
There is one big mistake in your argumentation. South Tyrolian cultural autonomy and bilingualism is not a present Italy gave to South Tyrolians. It is a duty of all democratic countries against autochthonous minorities.
I am surprised that you compare democratic Italy after WWII with communist Yugoslavia.
I've got respect for this solution you found for South Tyrol. It is taken as positive example all over Europe. But you are wrong if you think that South Tyrolians have to be thankful. And I am sad that you see a problem that they still are not "real" Italians and speak German better than Italian. They are loyal citizens of Italy. I see no problem in their different culture.
Only problem in my opinion is ethnic devision of society, especially in Bozen and Meran.
Why don't you see cultural enrichment South Tyrolians give to Italy?
Please, check the St. Bernard Treaty of Saint-Germain.

The concept of "Italian culture" itself is the amalgamation of very different cultural heritages from Sicily to Aosta. The question not any cultural contribution, but the excessive money the province gets. It is just unfair they get to keep 90% of the taxes collected in the province, a threshold far higher than any other province, especially considering they didn't take responsibility for more than, at most, 70% of costs of public services otherwise paid by the central Italian government.

Quote:
I think leaving Italy is not a priority to most South Tyrolians. Most of them are ok with autonomy, open borders and so on. Positive result of EU by the way.
Problem is more at people like you with old-fashioned national understanding. But these times are over. Relict of those times is Italian speaking majority in Bozen as a result of fascist Italianization.
People migrate, you know. Bolzano was an industrial center of relevance, and so, as every other medium city in the area like Treviso, Verona, Trento, Belluno, attracted a lot of impoverished rural farmers in the 1920 up to WW2, and after the war, to work on factories.

In any case, the situation is quiet over there, they got plenty of extra money, nobody is complaining and anyone age below 50 speaks Italian. Bored teenagers sometimes vandalize bi-lingual traffic signs, and for doing so they should be punished.
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Old September 7th, 2011, 09:58 PM   #5176
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You can't deny that they Italianised Bolzano on purpose, but oh well such is life, they didn't kill the people that were there
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Old September 8th, 2011, 12:34 AM   #5177
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Suburbanist View Post
What about an alternative narrative: after 150 years of oppression and settlement by Austrians, Italians liberated themselves and, after driving the enemy away, were keen enough to let the innocent civilians stay in stolen lands, despite the fact Austrian soldiers killed more than 600.000 Italians when they already knew their empire was gone.
"Austrians" at the time didn't mean just German-speaking people, and Italians were Austrians too.
You say "Austrian" soldiers killed 600.000 Italians in WWI, but Italy was the aggressor against Austria, not the opposite, and Italians killed too. My grandfathers were Italians of Austria, and they fought for Austria against Italy, and they felt Austria was their country. Just like Italians of Canton Ticino love Switzerland.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Suburbanist View Post
In that sense, Italy was somehow fortunate to have lost only Dalmatia, Istria and some areas in the Piemontese Alps to France, compared to what happened to Germany which saw its territory shrink and be divided into occupation zones.
Italy never lost Dalmatia, as Dalmatia has never been part of Italy, except the town of Zara between 1921-1943(de jure 1947).
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Old September 8th, 2011, 10:25 AM   #5178
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bogdymol View Post
Nădlac / Nagylak (Romania / Hungary) border ,
Hungary:

what does the symbol at the bottom mean, headlights may not be used in the city at daytime?

do people turn off the headlights in the cities ?
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Old September 8th, 2011, 10:39 AM   #5179
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Originally Posted by NordikNerd View Post
what does the symbol at the bottom mean, headlights may not be used in the city at daytime?
No, on the contrary: headlights must be used outside towns, even daylight.
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Old September 8th, 2011, 10:59 AM   #5180
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Quote:
Originally Posted by NordikNerd View Post
what does the symbol at the bottom mean, headlights may not be used in the city at daytime?

do people turn off the headlights in the cities ?
No, headlights should be used outside towns and cities all the time. The red crossed symbol means "not" in the case, which you combine with the headlights-on sign.
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