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Old January 27th, 2012, 07:49 PM   #5681
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BTW, how were living standards in the SFRY? I know that they were allowed to travel abroad, but were food and other good shortages common and police repressive like in other socialist countries?
it was more like eastern countries than western. it was still quite closed market, so the shops were fullfilled only with domestic goods. however, everything was really quality.
imagine that you can not buy, dunno, Milka in the supermarket. the only foreign food brands i remember were Coca Cola and Pepsi (however, no Fanta and other things from the group). i think that i remember also Knorr and Maggi
also, there were periods when there was lack of some primary things such as coffee. and my older friends say that in 70es or early 80es there was period when you could buy in shops only for some kind of tickets.
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Old January 27th, 2012, 08:09 PM   #5682
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I remember in the second half of the 80's that my uncle (living close to Zagreb - near Velika Gorica) did go to Hungary for shopping. So the border was accessible. Hungarian butter, Hungarian sausages, Hungarian cheese, etc.
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Old January 27th, 2012, 09:45 PM   #5683
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I remember in the second half of the 80's that my uncle (living close to Zagreb - near Velika Gorica) did go to Hungary for shopping. So the border was accessible. Hungarian butter, Hungarian sausages, Hungarian cheese, etc.
our only luck, that we had enough food in the past, otherwise, the rest of the world calling us: hungry hungary for ever
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Old January 27th, 2012, 10:08 PM   #5684
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imagine that you can not buy, dunno, Milka in the supermarket. the only foreign food brands i remember were Coca Cola and Pepsi (however, no Fanta and other things from the group). i think that i remember also Knorr and Maggi
A Serbian friend of mine remembers as a child sipping Coca Cola from a wine glass as it was such a treat.

I don't know if it has already been covered, but how was it travelling between different parts of the Yugoslav Republic? Were there ever any internal checks?
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Old January 27th, 2012, 11:35 PM   #5685
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A Serbian friend of mine remembers as a child sipping Coca Cola from a wine glass as it was such a treat.

I don't know if it has already been covered, but how was it travelling between different parts of the Yugoslav Republic? Were there ever any internal checks?
no, there were no checks. i remember traveling to Slovenia on excursion in 1988. the only sign that we entered Slovenia was 2 nearby gas stations: one was Ina, the other one was Petrol it was as passing Cataluya - Aragon border

Coca Cola was widely spread, we drank it regulary in my house. i remember it was sold in 1 litre glass bottles (returnable bottles)
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Old January 27th, 2012, 11:37 PM   #5686
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A Serbian friend of mine remembers as a child sipping Coca Cola from a wine glass as it was such a treat.

I don't know if it has already been covered, but how was it travelling between different parts of the Yugoslav Republic? Were there ever any internal checks?
First borders within ex-Yu republics appeared in 90's after first dissolution of SFRY. Before that, you could travel inside country everywhere you wanted to go. It was one country, not union of many countries/republic like EU today.
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Old January 27th, 2012, 11:58 PM   #5687
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Coca Cola was widely spread, we drank it regulary in my house. i remember it was sold in 1 litre glass bottles (returnable bottles)
Ah maybe she was a bit odd Well she was but that was just her. She also said in the time leading up to the breakup, her parents started hiding Deutschmarks inside books, that they purchased on the black market (the money, not the books).
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Old January 28th, 2012, 12:06 AM   #5688
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She also said in the time leading up to the breakup, her parents started hiding Deutschmarks inside books, that they purchased on the black market (the money, not the books).
that was normal. there were "sellers" of deutscharks usually on markets, whispering "marke marke" and paying attention not to be caught
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Old January 28th, 2012, 12:15 AM   #5689
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Coca Cola was widely spread, we drank it regulary in my house. i remember it was sold in 1 litre glass bottles (returnable bottles)
Returnable beverage bottles were used also in Italy in the past. Maybe one of the few things that were better in the past than now (for the environment, in this case).
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Old January 28th, 2012, 01:34 AM   #5690
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Do you know why? I know that relationships with other communist countries and Yugoslavia weren't good, but neither were those with western countries - especially Italy after WW2.
Sorry, I forgot that we needed visas for Greece (I accidentally just lumped it together with Italy and Austria). Going to the Eastern Block (or at least Hungary) wasn't particularly problematic AFAIK, but probably still a hassle compared to a few seconds to get to Italy or Austria. But going to Albania was almost impossible, even though we bordered each other (and I assume it was similar for Greeks and everyone else).
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Old January 28th, 2012, 05:05 AM   #5691
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Albania was even closed to the Albanians in Kosovo, some Albanian families unjustly split at the border thanks to the European powers of 1912 only managed to reunite when Albania brought down their regime in 1990. We now only need to show our ID's to visit our families and friends over the border.
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Old January 28th, 2012, 09:34 AM   #5692
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Quote:
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I don't know if it has already been covered, but how was it travelling between different parts of the Yugoslav Republic? Were there ever any internal checks?
There were even no signs telling that you were entering an other republic. In some cases (like Slovenia-Croatia) you could notice that you crossed a border since the languages changed, but people who don't speak the languages didn't notice that.
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Old January 28th, 2012, 09:38 AM   #5693
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Originally Posted by shpirtkosova
Albania was even closed to the Albanians in Kosovo, some Albanian families unjustly split at the border thanks to the European powers of 1912 only managed to reunite when Albania brought down their regime in 1990. We now only need to show our ID's to visit our families and friends over the border.
There were border crossings anyway between SFRJ and Albania (like Čafa San near Struga/Macedonia). So for sure the border could be crossed, but afaik not for 'normal' citizens. I remember that I have seen an Albanian plate in Ohrid, somewhere in 1982.
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Old January 28th, 2012, 10:11 AM   #5694
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I found some old Europe travel guides from 70s and 80s. They have a description of every European country including Soviet Union and the whole eastern block (that could already be visited with visas) but no Albania. So, probably it wasn't possible get there or at least it was very complicate like N.Korea today.
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In real life, electronic toll collection was first introduced in Bergen, Norway in 1986, and well into the 21th century many countries still struggle to implement it.
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Old January 28th, 2012, 11:02 AM   #5695
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Quote:
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BTW, how were living standards in the SFRY? I know that they were allowed to travel abroad, but were food and other good shortages common and police repressive like in other socialist countries?
Friends of my parents went for holiday to Yugoslavia in eighties. They described that country as a proper paradise. I also remember Yugoslavian scouts, especially girls, coming to a sports centre nearby my town. They looked very Western, had good clothes and smoked Marlboro
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Old January 28th, 2012, 11:22 AM   #5696
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I remember, in '89, there was a mega-inflation in Yugoslavia (fuel prices were doubled within a single week), we changed money only for one day since the next day both prices and exchange rate were significantly higher.
We bought 4 bottles of some Yugoslavian cognac (I myself was 15 then, can't remember exactly the brand) and custom officer at the Hungarian border said it was forbidden to have more than 1 bottle per person, and only people over 18 were allowed to have any. But my father told him that in this case he would 'accidentally' drop two bottles and possibly they would break so that the officer saw he could not take them and drink them himself (or sell them) he turned away and let us go with all of the drinks :-)
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Old January 28th, 2012, 03:16 PM   #5697
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Friends of my parents went for holiday to Yugoslavia in eighties. They described that country as a proper paradise. I also remember Yugoslavian scouts, especially girls, coming to a sports centre nearby my town. They looked very Western, had good clothes and smoked Marlboro
I heared from my parents that back in 80's Polish who were returning from their vacation on the seaside in Yugoslavia, used to stop in Zrenjanin to sell some Polish goods at the local market and get some money!
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Old January 28th, 2012, 03:51 PM   #5698
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I remember, in '89, there was a mega-inflation in Yugoslavia (fuel prices were doubled within a single week), we changed money only for one day since the next day both prices and exchange rate were significantly higher.
Yes, this was also very remarkable when driving from Hungary to Greece in 1989. Motorway tolls were different for domestic and foreign vehicles (higher for the latter, of course). At every toll booth, the toll got higher - the last one was over 100'000 dinars - until travellers had no more dinars left and had to use Deutschmark to pay. This was a likely co-intention of the tolls: flushing some hard currency into the system ...

Taking alcoholic beverages (or pure alcohol) from YU was popular with Hungarians at that time
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Old January 28th, 2012, 04:17 PM   #5699
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I heared from my parents that back in 80's Polish who were returning from their vacation on the seaside in Yugoslavia, used to stop in Zrenjanin to sell some Polish goods at the local market and get some money!
only Zrenjanin? whole northern Croatia, probably northern Serbia and Slovenia were influenced! i have few things bought from that period, our market in Bjelovar was occupied by Poles. i have few screwdrivers sets and my mother has fur coat bought from Poles in 80es, those things are quality as hell!
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Old January 28th, 2012, 04:26 PM   #5700
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After WWII there was a far-left movement that wanted to made ... Trieste and Gorizia the 7th Yugoslav republic.
Not exactly, they wanted Gorizia as part of Slovenia, and just the single municipality of Trieste as the 7th republic.
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