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Old March 13th, 2012, 04:21 AM   #5821
Genesis01
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When i was 2 years old we moved to Moscow, the capital of the Soviet Union and lived there for 5 years. My father got a scholarship in a Moscow university and decided to move my mother and me with him as well. I don't remember a lot from this time but they told me there was really hard to find a home for rent, because it was illegal for a foreigner to rent a flat there. We were not allowed to leave Moscow, only to travels to home (Hungary) and back. Half the time we went by plane and half the time by train. The train took 2 days to get there and the inspection in the SU-HU border was very through. It took hours. They looked in every bag, woke up everybody in the middle of the night to check identities.
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Old March 13th, 2012, 04:22 AM   #5822
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It was of course common to smuggle things because in the SU there was a shortage of clothes, you couldn't buy jeans, and on the other way machinery and tools were very cheap there (Russia had plenty of steel ). So my father told me he used to smuggle drillers, grinding machines, planers and other hardware stuff. The luggage on the plane could not exceed 20kgs but the hand luggage wasn't controlled, so a lot of people carried these heavy machines in hand, and after boarding the plane put in the overhead closet. It was a miracle the plane didn't crash because of the overweight they said
Once my dad had his suitcase full of iron stuff as usual and the flight was canceled, he had to go to the other end of the airport, few km-s being one of the biggest airports in Moscow with all the heavy stuff
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Old March 13th, 2012, 12:17 PM   #5823
Chilio
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Genesis01 View Post
On the other hand crime levels were extremely low.
It's quite an offtopic, but this is not true. Officially crime levels were extremely low, because communists wanted to show their society is perfect - that's why they hid facts about crimes, child mortality, serious illnesses etc. Crimes levels were probably the same, but never got to official statistics As well as numbers of disabled people or people with mental problems, who were sent to distant mountain villages to be hidden in almost concentration-camp-looking like hospitals and caring homes.
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Old March 13th, 2012, 06:41 PM   #5824
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Polish - Belarussian border in Koterka:

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Originally Posted by Laskos View Post


Za szlabanem, w stronę Białorusi

W stronę Polski

Koniec drogi



Jakieś pomysły, co to za zabudowania?





Pas graniczny w stronę Terespola

I w stronę Białegostoku


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Old March 13th, 2012, 07:23 PM   #5825
Genesis01
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Chilio View Post
It's quite an offtopic, but this is not true. Officially crime levels were extremely low, because communists wanted to show their society is perfect - that's why they hid facts about crimes, child mortality, serious illnesses etc. Crimes levels were probably the same, but never got to official statistics As well as numbers of disabled people or people with mental problems, who were sent to distant mountain villages to be hidden in almost concentration-camp-looking like hospitals and caring homes.
You have a point there. What i meant was drug problems was a lot lower, there was fewer crimes committed by the poor because everybody had to have a job even when the person didn't do anything all day at the workplace, and tax frauds weren't exist because one wasn't allowed to have a company.
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Old March 13th, 2012, 07:44 PM   #5826
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Yes, the lower level of crime in many areas simply resulted from the fact that Commie-style repression and surveillance also applied to criminals.
Another remarkable example of this: Gypsy crime. In those times, probably many of them didn't really work hard (just because of formally having a job and workplace), but at least, with being supervised much more, they had far less chances of simply roaming the streets in gangs and stealing, robbing, mugging ordinary people. Plus, they could not play the "racist card" (first disrespect the rules and then calling racist those who want to sanction them).
Of course no Commie regime whatsoever is needed to keep order - there are many examples of states with law & order and security that never ever had Socialist dictatorship: Switzerland, Japan, Singapore, ...
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Old March 13th, 2012, 08:53 PM   #5827
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Quote:
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Of course no Commie regime whatsoever is needed to keep order - there are many examples of states with law & order and security that never ever had Socialist dictatorship: Switzerland, Japan, Singapore, ...
The last one isn't very democratic.
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In real life, electronic toll collection was first introduced in Bergen, Norway in 1986, and well into the 21th century many countries still struggle to implement it.

Last edited by italystf; March 13th, 2012 at 09:02 PM.
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Old March 13th, 2012, 09:41 PM   #5828
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he didn't say democratic states, just said states that never had commie dictatorship.
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Old March 13th, 2012, 11:28 PM   #5829
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Quote:
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The last one isn't very democratic.
When I flew to Malaysia (just a transfer), I remember we got cards to fulfill (I didn't have to though) where it said in the end "Be forwarned death for drug-trafficking". It makes you feel a little uncomfortable.
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Old March 14th, 2012, 05:46 AM   #5830
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A house bisected by an international border. Eat in one country and shit in another maybe.

http://media.economist.com/images/20090530/2209AM2.jpg

More:

http://whereisyvette.files.wordpress...stoms-sign.jpg

http://top5s.net/wp-content/uploads/2011/05/576.jpg
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Old March 15th, 2012, 01:38 AM   #5831
alserrod
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Corvinus View Post
Yes, the lower level of crime in many areas simply resulted from the fact that Commie-style repression and surveillance also applied to criminals.
Another remarkable example of this: Gypsy crime. In those times, probably many of them didn't really work hard (just because of formally having a job and workplace), but at least, with being supervised much more, they had far less chances of simply roaming the streets in gangs and stealing, robbing, mugging ordinary people. Plus, they could not play the "racist card" (first disrespect the rules and then calling racist those who want to sanction them).
Of course no Commie regime whatsoever is needed to keep order - there are many examples of states with law & order and security that never ever had Socialist dictatorship: Switzerland, Japan, Singapore, ...


1939-1975 at Spain there was a dictatorship government (but fascism, not Socialist).

The government made the following rules:

- No passport for anybody except people allowed. If no passport, people could not leave the country.

- A new identity card, which it is still in use. Really... it is mandatory for every people older than 14 years old, but... you could need it for opening a bank account because its number is required, or just for some airplane companies (this week I made my daugther's ID card, and she is only seven months old).
With ID card was possible to identify every citizen and was allowed and required for any document nevertheless where in the country.

- For too many years, areas around borders where allowed only for citizens of those areas. Should you want to go there, you had to ask for a visa (allowed only to be about 30-50 km from the border, not to cross it)

- In 1939, after the civil war finished, police asked to any citizen who was not living there before the war (to know why the mobility...).



But... there was a flight Moscow-Madrid and someones more. Being in opposition to those countries it was possible to go by plane if authorization adquired.

For several years, only Argentina had an embassy. In the 60s a lot of countries started opening embassies and in the 70s, the USSR opened its embassy and later all eastern European countries (and upside down from Spain in those countries).

Firs USSR embassy was just an appartment in the centre of Madrid, but the flag was in the window.
Comunist party was forbidden and it is know that all of them where walking sometimes around there because it was the only site in Spain where that flag was legal and they wanted to see from the street.



I crossed border to Portugal in 1987, being both UE, and passport was required in the border by both countries.
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Old March 15th, 2012, 01:40 AM   #5832
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Quote:
Originally Posted by alserrod View Post
1939-1975 at Spain there was a dictatorship government (but fascism, not Socialist).



- No passport for anybody except people allowed. If no passport, people could not leave the country.
Thats quite a funny typo (or left out word)
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Old March 15th, 2012, 02:00 AM   #5833
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Wow, interesting testimoniances. Didn't know that fascist Spain was similar to commie countries regards borders and right of travel. So France had a sort of iron curtain in the south until 1975?
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“The transponder’s personalised signal would be picked up when the car passed through an intersection, and then relayed to a central computer which would calculate the charge according to the intersection and the time of day and add it to the car’s bill” - Nobel Economics Prize winner William Vickrey, proposing a system of electronic tolling for the Washington metropolitan area, 1959
In real life, electronic toll collection was first introduced in Bergen, Norway in 1986, and well into the 21th century many countries still struggle to implement it.
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Old March 15th, 2012, 02:01 AM   #5834
NorthWesternGuy
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Here I have something for those tired of seeing pages and pages of unrestricted borders.

Mexicali Port of Entry #1, under renovation process.

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///M5
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Old March 15th, 2012, 07:52 PM   #5835
Corvinus
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What are typical waiting times at the common MEX -> USA crossings? (bearing in mind the issues of illegal immigration and drug trafficking routes)
What questions do U.S. customs officers typically ask from
- Mexicans
- Americans
- 3rd-country tourists
What do they check in/on the vehicle?
Are there smaller, "village" border crossings outside main routes where waiting times are reduced?
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Old March 16th, 2012, 01:02 AM   #5836
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Corvinus View Post
What are typical waiting times at the common MEX -> USA crossings? (bearing in mind the issues of illegal immigration and drug trafficking routes)
What questions do U.S. customs officers typically ask from
- Mexicans
- Americans
- 3rd-country tourists
What do they check in/on the vehicle?
Are there smaller, "village" border crossings outside main routes where waiting times are reduced?
I crossed on foot into mexico for about half a day at del rio / ciudad acuna a few years ago - there was very little traffic and no queue at all to reach the border, although I'm sure the formalities would be equivalent to anywhere else (there isn't much there on the US side in terms of either local population or transport routes).

Ended up sitting around for about an hour on re-entering the US because the relevant person (for dealing with visa waiver) was busy or something, not sure if going through in a car would have been any better!
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Old March 16th, 2012, 01:20 AM   #5837
alserrod
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Quote:
Originally Posted by italystf View Post
Wow, interesting testimoniances. Didn't know that fascist Spain was similar to commie countries regards borders and right of travel. So France had a sort of iron curtain in the south until 1975?


yeah... but quite different.

It was a fascist government, and apart of the Eastern European countries, the "enemies" were dissident citizens

While second world war, Spain remained neutral (civil war end in april 1939 and IIWW started on september 1939, there was no army to participate) but it is known that should they got involved, they will help Germany (Franco and Hitler had an interview at Hendaye, France, about this)

After IIWW, for about ten years at least, all countries did not forget the possition of Spain while the war, even if it was always neutral.

New embassies started to be opened at Spain but slowly.

But the "enemy" was those dissident citizens with the government. That's why they invented the ID card and the passport was given only to citizens allowed to quite the country.

Foreing citizens could enter Spain without no problem. There was no restriction except for several countries.
Other thing... is that it was very inusual to visit Spain in those years.


So... French citizens could enter Spain without any problem. The problem was for Spanish to exit to France.



P.S. At Portugal the government was not very different, but other country. All borders were controlled as well as the other ones but it was not used to quite the country because if you were catched at Portugal without correct passport you were assured to be returned to Spain and upside down (being similar governments, they had "cooperation")
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Old March 16th, 2012, 01:32 AM   #5838
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I think that the Portuguese government let people out more than the Spanish (I saw more, I'm not saying that it was easy though, just easier than with Spain) and also had better foreign relations, but it was still an awful regime.
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Old March 16th, 2012, 02:27 AM   #5839
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Genesis01

You have a point there. What i meant was drug problems was a lot lower
Sorry to continue the off-topic conversation: perhaps in Hungary the drug problem was smaller, but not in Poland. Communism was no paradise, so people did heroin. Lots of people...
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Old March 16th, 2012, 05:38 AM   #5840
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Corvinus View Post
What are typical waiting times at the common MEX -> USA crossings? (bearing in mind the issues of illegal immigration and drug trafficking routes)
What questions do U.S. customs officers typically ask from
- Mexicans
- Americans
- 3rd-country tourists
What do they check in/on the vehicle?
Are there smaller, "village" border crossings outside main routes where waiting times are reduced?

I live in Reynosa Mexico, the city has three international bridges that connect with 3 cities in Texas, Reynosa-Mission, Reynosa-Hidalgo and Pharr-Reynosa. The waiting times range from 5 minutes to over an hour at times, it depends on time of day and day of the week. weekend tends to increase the timeout.

Crossing into the U.S the migration officers ask for your visa, they ask where you're going and if you have anything to declare, then they let you cross, although some migration officers look into your vehicle to check if you are carrying drugs or something illegal.
If you are a U.S. citizen, the officer will ask for your passport, verify your citizenship, ask if you have something to declare and then welcome you back to the United States

when you cross into Mexico, you have to wait your turn in the "red-green light area", If you get the green light, proceed on slowly past the inspection area. If you get the red light, a Mexican Customs inspector will indicate where you need to park for inspection and the soldiers will ask if you have anything to declare and they will check if you are carrying weapons or ammunition. Firearms and ammunition are illegal in mexico, nearly all illegal arms seized in mexico come from the United states.
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