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Old March 16th, 2012, 06:37 AM   #5841
El Tiburon
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Corvinus View Post
What are typical waiting times at the common MEX -> USA crossings? (bearing in mind the issues of illegal immigration and drug trafficking routes)
What questions do U.S. customs officers typically ask from
- Mexicans
- Americans
- 3rd-country tourists
What do they check in/on the vehicle?
Are there smaller, "village" border crossings outside main routes where waiting times are reduced?
If you are carrying Cuban identity papers but do not look or sound Cuban, U.S. Immigration officers will ask Cuban pop culture questions such as the time at which Lola was killed or who owned the banana plantation or what was the reason the boas don't have caves anymore, etc. to make sure you are really a Cuban citizen and that your papers are real and not forged or bought in the black market, and, therefore, you can enter the U.S. with a parole that allows Cubans to apply for permanent residency in a year and a day.
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Old March 16th, 2012, 08:24 PM   #5842
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Originally Posted by DanielFigFoz View Post
I think that the Portuguese government let people out more than the Spanish (I saw more, I'm not saying that it was easy though, just easier than with Spain) and also had better foreign relations, but it was still an awful regime.


That's thrue. Every country had its relations and government. And borders were controlled in both sides as with any country or airport.

But there were cases of Portuguese or Spanish dissidents arrested by police in the other country and returned inmediately. That's why in Spain people always though in going to France and not to Portugal.
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Old March 16th, 2012, 10:52 PM   #5843
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Originally Posted by Genesis01 View Post
Another friend of mine was a border guard in the Austrian-Hungarian border.
Heh I admit I first thought your friend was over a 100 years old (Austria-Hungary was a very long time ago after all )
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Old March 16th, 2012, 11:57 PM   #5844
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And there were no border controls in Europe in those times.
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Old March 17th, 2012, 12:43 AM   #5845
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Verso
And there were no border controls in Europe in those times.
Really? Also between Italy and Austria - Hungary?
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“The transponder’s personalised signal would be picked up when the car passed through an intersection, and then relayed to a central computer which would calculate the charge according to the intersection and the time of day and add it to the car’s bill” - Nobel Economics Prize winner William Vickrey, proposing a system of electronic tolling for the Washington metropolitan area, 1959
In real life, electronic toll collection was first introduced in Bergen, Norway in 1986, and well into the 21th century many countries still struggle to implement it.
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Old March 17th, 2012, 12:53 AM   #5846
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I'm not sure, but border controls were introduced after WWI. You could've gone to Moscow without checking documents.
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Old March 17th, 2012, 01:39 AM   #5847
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I'm not sure, but border controls were introduced after WWI. You could've gone to Moscow without checking documents.
Are you sure? What was than purpose of this passport back in days?

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Old March 17th, 2012, 03:21 AM   #5848
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I don't know, that's what Wikipedia says.
Quote:
Before 1914, it was possible to travel from Paris to Saint Petersburg without a passport.[2] When the First World War came to an end, the practice of issuing passports and performing routine passport controls at national frontiers remained and became the norm in Europe until the implementation of the Schengen Area in 1985.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Schengen_Agreement#History

More about it here.
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Old March 17th, 2012, 05:44 AM   #5849
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Originally Posted by erxgli View Post
I live in Reynosa Mexico, the city has three international bridges that connect with 3 cities in Texas, Reynosa-Mission, Reynosa-Hidalgo and Pharr-Reynosa. The waiting times range from 5 minutes to over an hour at times, it depends on time of day and day of the week. weekend tends to increase the timeout.

Crossing into the U.S the migration officers ask for your visa, they ask where you're going and if you have anything to declare, then they let you cross, although some migration officers look into your vehicle to check if you are carrying drugs or something illegal.
If you are a U.S. citizen, the officer will ask for your passport, verify your citizenship, ask if you have something to declare and then welcome you back to the United States

when you cross into Mexico, you have to wait your turn in the "red-green light area", If you get the green light, proceed on slowly past the inspection area. If you get the red light, a Mexican Customs inspector will indicate where you need to park for inspection and the soldiers will ask if you have anything to declare and they will check if you are carrying weapons or ammunition. Firearms and ammunition are illegal in mexico, nearly all illegal arms seized in mexico come from the United states.
Basically what this fellow forumer said.

1.-The waiting times are proportional to the size of the city and the importance of the trade route.

Mexicali has 2 border crossings, the normal waiting times are 30-60 min, but during Christmas and New Year (Dec 25 & Jan 1) there are virtually no waiting time. Though on American holidays it's madness, the times can be up to 2-3 hours at the line.

Sonoyta, a small town on the Sonora-Arizona border, most of times doesn't have waiting time, but on holidays the entire town becomes divided by the line of cars waiting to enter the USA. (Sonoyta is between Phoenix and Puerto Peñasco AKA Rocky Point, a coastal city and popular tourist destination).

2.-What he/she said. If you are a third-country citizen, well... I'm sure the better relations the USA and your country have, the less questions they ask you

3.- Mexican customs officers look for illegal money (huge amounts of money whose origin you can't prove), besides ammo and weapons. When you enter Mexico you can choose between two options: declare lanes or nothing-to-declare lanes. If you choose to declare, you show your merchandise and pay the corresponding taxes. If you choose not to declare, you must cross a lane with a traffic light. If it turns green, you're free to leave with no questions. If it turns red, customs officers will proceed to check your vehicle. The bad thing is when you bring lots of stuff you bought in the US without declaring, if you get red light you'll have your stuff confiscated for sure, the red or green light is a matter of luck.
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Old March 17th, 2012, 10:11 AM   #5850
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Quote:
Originally Posted by NorthWesternGuy View Post

Mexicali has 2 border crossings, the normal waiting times are 30-60 min, but during Christmas and New Year (Dec 25 & Jan 1) there are virtually no waiting time. Though on American holidays it's madness, the times can be up to 2-3 hours at the line.
The border at Calexico was featured on the Tv-show "America's Border Security"
on channel 10 here in Sweden.

Also like "Border security Australia" a similar show.
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Old March 17th, 2012, 11:47 AM   #5851
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Quote:
Originally Posted by NorthWesternGuy

Basically what this fellow forumer said.

1.-The waiting times are proportional to the size of the city and the importance of the trade route.

Mexicali has 2 border crossings, the normal waiting times are 30-60 min, but during Christmas and New Year (Dec 25 & Jan 1) there are virtually no waiting time. Though on American holidays it's madness, the times can be up to 2-3 hours at the line.

Sonoyta, a small town on the Sonora-Arizona border, most of times doesn't have waiting time, but on holidays the entire town becomes divided by the line of cars waiting to enter the USA. (Sonoyta is between Phoenix and Puerto Peñasco AKA Rocky Point, a coastal city and popular tourist destination).

2.-What he/she said. If you are a third-country citizen, well... I'm sure the better relations the USA and your country have, the less questions they ask you

3.- Mexican customs officers look for illegal money (huge amounts of money whose origin you can't prove), besides ammo and weapons. When you enter Mexico you can choose between two options: declare lanes or nothing-to-declare lanes. If you choose to declare, you show your merchandise and pay the corresponding taxes. If you choose not to declare, you must cross a lane with a traffic light. If it turns green, you're free to leave with no questions. If it turns red, customs officers will proceed to check your vehicle. The bad thing is when you bring lots of stuff you bought in the US without declaring, if you get red light you'll have your stuff confiscated for sure, the red or green light is a matter of luck.
How they know if you bought that stuff in the USA in this occasion, if you throw away packagings?
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“The transponder’s personalised signal would be picked up when the car passed through an intersection, and then relayed to a central computer which would calculate the charge according to the intersection and the time of day and add it to the car’s bill” - Nobel Economics Prize winner William Vickrey, proposing a system of electronic tolling for the Washington metropolitan area, 1959
In real life, electronic toll collection was first introduced in Bergen, Norway in 1986, and well into the 21th century many countries still struggle to implement it.
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Old March 17th, 2012, 02:47 PM   #5852
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Alex_ZR View Post
Are you sure? What was than purpose of this passport back in days?

This is pass from Galicja in German and Polish.
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Old March 17th, 2012, 04:39 PM   #5853
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Alex_ZR View Post
Are you sure? What was than purpose of this passport back in days?
Just because there were no border controls within Europe doesn't mean you don't need a passport I would assume that if you wanted to visit the USA or the Ottoman Empire you would have still needed a passport. ;P
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Old March 17th, 2012, 05:01 PM   #5854
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Quote:
Originally Posted by zsmg
Just because there were no border controls within Europe doesn't mean you don't need a passport I would assume that if you wanted to visit the USA or the Ottoman Empire you would have still needed a passport. ;P
In the past border checks were enforced to control trades of goods, including between different Italian states before 1861.
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“The transponder’s personalised signal would be picked up when the car passed through an intersection, and then relayed to a central computer which would calculate the charge according to the intersection and the time of day and add it to the car’s bill” - Nobel Economics Prize winner William Vickrey, proposing a system of electronic tolling for the Washington metropolitan area, 1959
In real life, electronic toll collection was first introduced in Bergen, Norway in 1986, and well into the 21th century many countries still struggle to implement it.
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Old March 17th, 2012, 08:31 PM   #5855
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Alex_ZR View Post
Are you sure? What was than purpose of this passport back in days?
Proof of identity probably
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Old March 17th, 2012, 10:52 PM   #5856
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I have some vague plans of visiting Italy, arriving around 11 o clock in Trieste on saturday june 16th.

I thought of paying a short visit to Istria before going the other way in the direction Comacchio, Italy.

The border south of Trieste, how long does it take to pass it on a saturday in june. 1 hour or more? Do I need a vignette ? how much does it cost ? does slovenia have any special rules, like environmental sticker, bringing fire extinguisher or something like that.

Is the istrian SLO/HR border less time consuming?

If I arrive in Trieste 11.00 How much time do I need for a roadtrip to Koper-SLO including 1h stay there and return trip back to Trieste ?
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Old March 17th, 2012, 10:55 PM   #5857
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The Italian - Slovenian border will take about 0 seconds as there are no border checks.
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Old March 17th, 2012, 10:58 PM   #5858
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Originally Posted by ChrisZwolle View Post
The Italian - Slovenian border will take about 0 seconds as there are no border checks.
Looking at Google earth it seems like a major checkpoint with several lanes.
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Old March 17th, 2012, 11:15 PM   #5859
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Quote:
Originally Posted by NordikNerd

Looking at Google earth it seems like a major checkpoint with several lanes.
They didn't demolished old facilities after SLO joined Schengen in 2007. For Slovenian motorways (Ax routes) and expressways (Hx), you need a vinjeta (15EUR for a week). In Slovenia you need a fire extinguer and a first aid kit in your car. If you drive from Trieste to Rijeka no vinjeta is needed. If you go from Trieste to Umag you can avoid vinjeta by taking local roads instead of H5. Queues at SLO-HR border are common in summer, expecially on weekends.
Trieste - Koper is about 30 mins by car. In Trieste is better park on private parking lots near rail and bus station or on the seafront near the aquarium, but you have to pay. Streets are overcrowded and traffic is chaotic at peak hours. Everything interesting in Trieste is within walking distance.
If you will drive to Comacchio, follow the A4 towards Venice, then the A57 and finally SS309 to Ravenna. Trieste - Comacchio is around 3h. You can also reach Comacchio all the way by motorways, via Mestre, Padua and Ferrara, but you will spend more for fuel and toll. The Ferrara - Comacchio motorway is very substandard.

For any info about north west Italy, PM me. I'm glad to solve your doubts.
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“The transponder’s personalised signal would be picked up when the car passed through an intersection, and then relayed to a central computer which would calculate the charge according to the intersection and the time of day and add it to the car’s bill” - Nobel Economics Prize winner William Vickrey, proposing a system of electronic tolling for the Washington metropolitan area, 1959
In real life, electronic toll collection was first introduced in Bergen, Norway in 1986, and well into the 21th century many countries still struggle to implement it.

Last edited by italystf; March 17th, 2012 at 11:27 PM.
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Old March 17th, 2012, 11:24 PM   #5860
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Originally Posted by NordikNerd View Post
does slovenia have any special rules, like [...]bringing fire extinguisher or something like that.
You don't have to worry about special equipment. As per the Vienna convention (or is it the Geneva convention?) you can travel in any agreeing country with just the equipment required in your own country.
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