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Old July 16th, 2012, 07:35 PM   #6321
Malina PL
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Quote:
Originally Posted by cinxxx View Post
Isn't the speed limit on motorways in Poland 140 kmh?
Yes, it's 140km/h on motorways and 120 km/h on dual carriageway expressways.
This sign is old.
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Old July 16th, 2012, 08:36 PM   #6322
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Yes, it's 140km/h on motorways and 120 km/h on dual carriageway expressways.
This sign is old.
I photographed it four days ago...
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Old July 16th, 2012, 09:50 PM   #6323
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So, it's old and not up2date
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Old July 16th, 2012, 11:49 PM   #6324
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Can people understand one anothers language in these border regions like Cezch Republic and Poland?
Like looking at a map and street view I see two houses on Borovského, Karvina, Czech Rep. on one Polish side, one on Czech side and wonder do these people even communicate?

Living in the U.S. no where near any border crossings or different language borders I just have to wonder about it. Or can Czech speaking people reside on Polish side or vice versa (before Schengen)?
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Old July 17th, 2012, 12:31 AM   #6325
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Both Polish and Czech languages belong not only to the Slavic languages, but to the same West Slavic branch (along with Slovak and Sorbian spoken by a small Slavic minority in the east of Germany), so our languages are very closely related and mutually understandable. In that particular area there is also a sizeable Polish minority living along the border (at least 50 thousand people).

The only Polish borders where close to one another live people who speak very different and not easily understandable languages are with Germany and Lithuania, but also in this case you should not forget that there are Slavic Sorbians living close to the Polish border (more less between Bautzen and Cottbus) and some Poles living in Locknitz (west of Szczecin) and that there is a small Lithuanian minority inside Poland (Puńsk area) and a very significant Polish minority in Lithuania (more than a quarter of a million people in a country of 3,2 million).
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Old July 17th, 2012, 01:27 PM   #6326
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Can people understand one anothers language in these border regions like Cezch Republic and Poland?
Basically yes, they can. It is not the same language, but very similar (althouth spelling is very different). It does not necesserily meand that Polish people will understand a complex sentence about Czech poetry of 19th century, but Czech customers will not have problems in Polish shops, Czech-Polish neighbours are able to talk about gardening, etc., without learning each other's language,
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Old July 17th, 2012, 01:31 PM   #6327
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The Germans and Dutch on both sides of the border speak each others language well enough to chat. Same goes for the Germans and French.
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Old July 17th, 2012, 06:01 PM   #6328
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ScraperDude View Post
Can people understand one anothers language in these border regions like Cezch Republic and Poland?
Like looking at a map and street view I see two houses on Borovského, Karvina, Czech Rep. on one Polish side, one on Czech side and wonder do these people even communicate?

Living in the U.S. no where near any border crossings or different language borders I just have to wonder about it. Or can Czech speaking people reside on Polish side or vice versa (before Schengen)?
1. The border between PL and CZ has always been very mixed, sometimes natural (along a river), but sometimes down a rural road, or across a single property (think double tax bureaucracy). The border is similar to that of US/Canada, practically impossible to guard, it was actually a joke even during communist times.

2. Settling in foreign EU countries - no problem, Schengen has nothing to do with it, it only says that you can cross the border at a ford or jump across a creek, instead of having to drive to the nearest border crossing.

3. Basic communication between various Slavic languages is no problem, perhaps you can't talk about politics, but shop, train, etc. BTW there are funny false friends (Polish "seek" = Czech "f*ck")
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Old July 17th, 2012, 06:41 PM   #6329
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Quote:
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3. Basic communication between various Slavic languages is no problem, perhaps you can't talk about politics, but shop, train, etc. BTW there are funny false friends (Polish "seek" = Czech "f*ck")
True, though in classic czech literature from the 19th century is this word still fairly used as a synonym for hledat (seek, search).

There are many more confusing words - czech jahoda (strawbery) and polish jagoda (berry in general) are not the same, other casi is czech had (snake) and polish gad (reptile), czech droga (drug) and polish droga (street) etc...
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Old July 17th, 2012, 07:34 PM   #6330
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The Germans and Dutch on both sides of the border speak each others language well enough to chat. Same goes for the Germans and French.
Yes, there are many German speaker in the French region of Alsatia (for historical reasons, like in Alto Adige).
Are German and Dutch quite understandable each other like Italian and Spanish?
What about different Scandinavian languages (apart Finnish, off course)?
And between Baltic republics?
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Old July 17th, 2012, 08:48 PM   #6331
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Are German and Dutch quite understandable each other like Italian and Spanish?
German is in many ways similar to Dutch. However, the frequent mistake of the Dutch is that they underestimate the German language, instead trying to make Dutch words sound German and think they have excellent knowledge of German.

I've once heard this Dutch guy talking about an office (kantoor in Dutch), which he translated as "kantör", which may sound German, but it isn't. (The German word is Büro, which in turn sounds like the Dutch word for "desk" (bureau)).
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Old July 17th, 2012, 09:13 PM   #6332
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I remember numerous pages back someone posted story of a gentleman who's home was in a border region and his driveway was blocked off etc. by the government.
I think it was a Slovakia/Hungary border or... I can't really remember the excat location.

It seems the new U.S. border fence is doing the same thing to U.S. citizens in the Rio Grande Valley of Texas. Due to an environmental rule about development near the Rio Grande river, the U.S. govt is building this fence further north and peoples homes are stuck south of it and will have to use a passcode to open a gate to their driveways! Sounds ridiculous!

If you want a google street view use this address: 11106 Southmost Blvd. South Point, Texas

Here's a story from last November on the subject.
Here's the story from New York Times
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Old July 17th, 2012, 09:19 PM   #6333
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Another place to see the fence cut through a road is (but breaks to allow the road to pass through) is at this address:
1659 County Road 125, Brownsville, TX

I understand the reason for the fence but still how is it effective with roads and no gates?
I suppose if border patrol plans to stake out the open crossing it could be effective. Regardless this fence is inland seperating U.S. land not on the border like Arizona or California. Once again due to the laws about building close to the river.
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Old July 17th, 2012, 09:27 PM   #6334
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ScraperDude View Post
Can people understand one anothers language in these border regions like Cezch Republic and Poland?
Like looking at a map and street view I see two houses on Borovského, Karvina, Czech Rep. on one Polish side, one on Czech side and wonder do these people even communicate?

Living in the U.S. no where near any border crossings or different language borders I just have to wonder about it. Or can Czech speaking people reside on Polish side or vice versa (before Schengen)?
The same here in Slovakia. In Slovakia-Czech Rep., Slovakia-Ukraine, Slovakia-Poland border regions people can handle both the languages as they belong to the slavic group of languages With czech language we have no problem at all, due to the 70 years of living in one country and commong media market (books, movies etc) we have became naturaly bilingual people. Polish depends - I'm form the northeastern Slovakia, dialect spoken there are very similar to polish, we used to watch polist TV at home. Ukrainian mostly in the far eastern Slovakia, but people from the west don't understand it. Southern Slovakia shares border with Hungary, we have 10% of hungarian minority here so people communicate mostly hungarian down there. Now I live in Bratislava which is the only capital city in the world that borders two other countries (Austria an Hungary). Due to the complex history this city was trilingual - slovak, german and hungarian (and jewish, too). Borders are all around the city (check the map), many slovaks work in Vienna, live in Austria or Hungary and work in Bratislava etc. It's common here to understand and speak hungarian or german here. We are small country influenced by all the countries around so our language is sort of central european esperanto))))
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Old July 17th, 2012, 09:37 PM   #6335
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What is the Komarom-Komarno situation? I have been in Komarom loads of times, at the Nokia site, and I have seen the bridge that forms the border with Komarno, Slovakia often enough, but never went across it. Do the people get along?

In Slovakia I usually go to Zvolen. What is the relationship between the people of Bratislava, and the local Austrians across the border? It is a weird sight, driving in the Austrian countryside, with the communist-but-done-up-style skyline of Bratislava in the distance...
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Old July 17th, 2012, 10:59 PM   #6336
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What about different Scandinavian languages (apart Finnish, off course)?
For the spoken variety, Swedes usually understand Norwegian and vice versa for Norwegians, but both have a hard time with Danish. Danish people on the other hand can usually make something of both, but tend to find Norweigan a bit easier since the vocabulary is less different. Written text is often of no problem, except for the difference in vocabulary.
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Old July 18th, 2012, 03:32 AM   #6337
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We are small country influenced by all the countries around so our language is sort of central european esperanto))))
I don't find Slovak to be similar to German or Hungarian at all.
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Old July 18th, 2012, 08:43 AM   #6338
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I don't find Slovak to be similar to German or Hungarian at all.
we have a lot of germant and hungarian words in the language. bratislava had been quite germanised city for centuries, germant colonisation in the 12th and 15th century has resulted in large scale to the architecture, habits, there are still regions in slovakia where people speak dialects of german (northern and central slovakia). and the same with hungarian.
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Old July 18th, 2012, 11:06 AM   #6339
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What is the Komarom-Komarno situation? I have been in Komarom loads of times, at the Nokia site, and I have seen the bridge that forms the border with Komarno, Slovakia often enough, but never went across it. Do the people get along
Yes, but there are lots of political issues there. Not so long ago the president of Hungary was blocked by Slovak police on the bridge and he didn't manage to enter Slovakia. Komarno (called also Komárom in our language, it had been the same town for several centuries) and especially the region beyond the town has a Hungarian ethnical majority and some Slovak politicians always think we want to get that region back to Hungary and try to block Hungarian-Hungarian contacts as far as possible.

So, back to the topic: both sides of Danube has a Tesco shop and when Euro is stronger and Forint weaker, Slovak customers come to Hungary for shopping, and vice versa. For almost all residents of Komarno and that region speak at least mediocre Hungarian, there are basically no language issues.
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Old July 18th, 2012, 11:34 AM   #6340
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Yes, I did some shopping in the Hungarian Tesco. It only a 100 somewhat meters from the bridge.
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