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Old March 11th, 2013, 08:46 PM   #7041
ChrisZwolle
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There is no road border crossing between Russia and North Korea, but there is a railway service between the two countries. Russian road A189 dead-ends at the border river in Khasan. Interestingly, this photo was taken from China, the bridge is in Russia/North Korea.

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Old March 11th, 2013, 11:46 PM   #7042
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Quote:
Originally Posted by OulaL View Post
Interestingly, though North Korea and Russia don't have a road connection, they do have a rail connection. Obsiously, its usage involves a lot of bureaucracy...

Here's a story from 2008. I'm not sure how it works today.

http://vienna-pyongyang.blogspot.fi/
I read the whole thing, it's awesome. Thanks for sharing.
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Old March 11th, 2013, 11:58 PM   #7043
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Quote:
Originally Posted by vraem View Post
costa rica nicaragua border....the most fought by a lake and a river



I crossed this border in November 2010. I took a boat from Los Chiles (Costa Rica) to San Carlos (Nicaragua). Here's some pictures of the welcome sign of both countries:




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Old March 12th, 2013, 03:27 AM   #7044
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Says November 2010, and you have not come across this







Quote:
Originally Posted by popcalent View Post
I crossed this border in November 2010. I took a boat from Los Chiles (Costa Rica) to San Carlos (Nicaragua). Here's some pictures of the welcome sign of both countries:





Last edited by vraem; March 12th, 2013 at 03:54 AM.
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Old March 12th, 2013, 03:40 AM   #7045
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out of nowhere the Nicaraguan army (Costa Rica has no army) occupied a small territory of Costa Rica in the border and created a canal and declares that the new canal is the border, now that territory is in "dispute"
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Old March 13th, 2013, 12:16 AM   #7046
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Algeria - Morocco

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Old March 13th, 2013, 12:27 AM   #7047
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China - North Korea









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Old March 13th, 2013, 01:10 AM   #7048
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Quote:
Originally Posted by italystf View Post
China - North Korea




Is it possible for non-North Koreans/Chinese to cross this border? Or to ever get to where these signs are?

Edit: Upon further examination of the pictures, I believe the signs are not in the middle of the bridge but on the Chinese shore of the river. I thought the sign on the second picture was half-way into the bridge and that the three women were in North Korea. But it seems that North Korea is behind them, across the river. Is that right?

Last edited by popcalent; March 13th, 2013 at 02:15 AM.
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Old March 13th, 2013, 04:00 AM   #7049
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Quote:
Originally Posted by popcalent View Post
Is it possible for non-North Koreans/Chinese to cross this border? Or to ever get to where these signs are?

Edit: Upon further examination of the pictures, I believe the signs are not in the middle of the bridge but on the Chinese shore of the river. I thought the sign on the second picture was half-way into the bridge and that the three women were in North Korea. But it seems that North Korea is behind them, across the river. Is that right?
Google Maps to the rescue: https://maps.google.com/?ll=40.11557...21136&t=h&z=16

Both pictures taken from the Chinese side. First one is easy to find. Second picture would be probably taken around that circular plaza just above the railway bridge. On Google Maps you can even see the tall chimneys on the North Korean side.
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Old March 13th, 2013, 04:40 AM   #7050
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Quote:
Originally Posted by gdolniak View Post
Google Maps to the rescue: https://maps.google.com/?ll=40.11557...21136&t=h&z=16

Both pictures taken from the Chinese side. First one is easy to find. Second picture would be probably taken around that circular plaza just above the railway bridge. On Google Maps you can even see the tall chimneys on the North Korean side.
So the broken bridge goes into North Korea (according to Google Maps). I've been searching on the internet, and it seems they wanted to open Sinuiju (on the Korean side) visa-free to westerners. I've found many articles on the internet where they say they wanted to do it, but none that says that they actually did it or if they're going to do it soon. Anyone knows?

Here's a more precise location of the whereabouts of the first sign:


This is what the sign says, by the way: 中朝辺境丹东鴨緑江
中 China
朝 North Korea
辺境 Border Area
丹东 Dandong
鴨緑江 Yalu River


This has grabbed my attention, I'm already looking at flights to Beijing and trains to Dondang.

Last edited by popcalent; March 13th, 2013 at 05:18 AM.
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Old March 13th, 2013, 12:14 PM   #7051
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I though Chineses could go to North Korea but North Koreans can't go to China.
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In real life, electronic toll collection was first introduced in Bergen, Norway in 1986, and well into the 21th century many countries still struggle to implement it.
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Old March 13th, 2013, 01:31 PM   #7052
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Can North Koreans go anywhere?
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Old March 13th, 2013, 02:49 PM   #7053
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Quote:
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Can North Koreans go anywhere?
As far as I know, North Koreans are not allowed to roam freely their own country, let alone leave it.

There are very few exceptions where a North Korean can leave the country: diplomatic missions, sport events, and stays abroad to acquire a skill.

These last are very rare, are supported and mandated by the government to an individual to learn a skill that he will use to serve the government, and 99.99% of these stays happen in China.
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Old March 13th, 2013, 09:38 PM   #7054
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Freedom of movement

North Korean citizens usually cannot freely travel around the country,[12] let alone travel abroad.[4][5][12] Emigration is forbidden.[12] Only the political elite may own or lease vehicles, and the government limits access to fuel and other forms of transportation due to frequent shortages of gasoline, diesel fuel, crude oil, coal and other fossil fuels (satellite photos of North Korea show an almost complete absence of vehicles on all of its roads throughout the country, even in its cities). Forced resettlement of citizens and whole families, especially as punishment for political reasons, is said to be routine.[42]

North Korean refugees who flee to China are often later forcibly repatriated back to North Korea by authorities, are routinely beaten, and sent to prison camps.[43] This is because the North Korean government treats emigrants from the country as defectors.[43] This treatment is more severe in cases where North Korean refugees have come into contact with non-governmental organizations (NGOs) that are associated with South Korea or with religions, especially Christianity.[43] In cases where the North Korean government discovers that contact has occurred between refugees and these NGOs, the punishments for these refugees are torture and execution upon their repatriation back to North Korea.[43]

Only the most loyal, politically reliable, and healthiest citizens are allowed to live in Pyongyang. Those who are suspected of sedition, or who have family members suspected of it, are expelled from the city; similar conditions affect those who are physically or mentally disabled in some way (the only exception being People's Army Korean War veterans with injuries relating to the conflict). This can be a significant method of coercion since food and housing are said to be much better in the capital city than elsewhere in the country.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Human_r...in_North_Korea
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Old March 15th, 2013, 03:12 PM   #7055
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ChrisZwolle View Post
There is no road border crossing between Russia and North Korea, but there is a railway service between the two countries. Russian road A189 dead-ends at the border river in Khasan. Interestingly, this photo was taken from China, the bridge is in Russia/North Korea.
Look for details here:

Station Pyongyang with the a list of trains: http://www.ptdb.info/europe2013/stop.php?idstop=3000003

Train Moskva Iaroslavskaja → Pjöng Yang http://www.ptdb.info/europe2013/rout...3&idxrun=58021

Unfortunately the database is German, so is the transliteration
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Old March 15th, 2013, 04:03 PM   #7056
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Vertigo View Post
Armenia - Azerbeijan is closed, though you can travel from Armenia into the disputed terretory of Nagorny Karabakh, which according to the view of most countries is inside Azerbeijan.

Georgia - Russia and Azerbeijan - Russia borders are open, but may only be crossed by CIS citizens.

I found this video in which the border Russia - Georgia is crossed (at 21:20 in the video).

I just want to state if you ever going to visit Nagorno-Karabakh region, which is currently under armenian separatist regime, you will be denied visa to Azerbaijan. In short words, you will become persona non-grata
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Old March 15th, 2013, 08:32 PM   #7057
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Xtreminal View Post
I just want to state if you ever going to visit Nagorno-Karabakh region, which is currently under armenian separatist regime, you will be denied visa to Azerbaijan. In short words, you will become persona non-grata
Can you ask for the stamp on a separate sheet (and not on your passport) like in Israel?
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In real life, electronic toll collection was first introduced in Bergen, Norway in 1986, and well into the 21th century many countries still struggle to implement it.
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Old March 15th, 2013, 09:40 PM   #7058
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Quote:
Originally Posted by italystf View Post
Can you ask for the stamp on a separate sheet (and not on your passport) like in Israel?
I don't know but counter-agencies are working and you don't want to involve and go to jail. Furthermore, nothing to see in Karabakh, it is very dangerous and militarised zone
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Old March 15th, 2013, 09:55 PM   #7059
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Xtreminal View Post
I don't know but counter-agencies are working and you don't want to involve and go to jail. Furthermore, nothing to see in Karabakh, it is very dangerous and militarised zone
It looks like that most of Caucasus is a conflict or semi-conflict zone off-limit for tourists.
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“The transponder’s personalised signal would be picked up when the car passed through an intersection, and then relayed to a central computer which would calculate the charge according to the intersection and the time of day and add it to the car’s bill” - Nobel Economics Prize winner William Vickrey, proposing a system of electronic tolling for the Washington metropolitan area, 1959
In real life, electronic toll collection was first introduced in Bergen, Norway in 1986, and well into the 21th century many countries still struggle to implement it.
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Old March 15th, 2013, 11:52 PM   #7060
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What about visiting Korea (either of them) and then visiting the other with a stamp in the passport? (And I'm not talking about that demilitarized area described a couple of messaged above.)

How does that work, or does it? Sure, I believe foreigners can't cross the inter-Korean border, but they must travel via the PR of China - but is even that allowed with "wrong" Korea's stamp?
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