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Old October 6th, 2015, 05:58 PM   #13821
Sentilj
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Quote:
Originally Posted by x-type View Post
can you explain a little bit procedure for Laotians or Chinese for crossing the border? how long does it take, do you need some special documents, visa or something?
sorry for such questions, but this is really cool and exotic to most of the people here
It´s very simple, only crossing through pile of broken tiles is mandatory
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Old October 6th, 2015, 06:24 PM   #13822
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can you explain a little bit procedure for Laotians or Chinese for crossing the border? how long does it take, do you need some special documents, visa or something?
sorry for such questions, but this is really cool and exotic to most of the people here
From China to Laos: From the Chinese side, go inside a building near the border and tell them you want to drive to Laos and Thailand, and they will check your passport, driving license and vehicle license then give you the papers required, include a "CHN" sign which you put it behind the windscreen. You also get a piece of paper which is like the temporary "passport" of your car, with type of your car, country it registered, plate number and etc on it, Laotian and Thai customs would stamp on this piece of paper upon your car's arrival or departure. Usually the validity is 30 days. Then you go to the border crossing with your passport as usual. After clear the immigration, you exit back to your car, and drive it across the border. On the Laotian side, you park your car near the customs building, get inside the building and pay for the visa on arrival. They will stamp on your passport, also on your car's "passport". Then you exit and drive past the customs building. Some insurance sellers and "car washers" are waiting just outside of the customs, you have to buy from them and you have to "wash" your car (which takes 5 seconds at most). Another immigration point is about 5 km away from the border crossing, you go to the office counter with all the documents you have and they will ask where you want to go and you have to pay for something. The whole process should take 30 to 60 minutes if you know what you are doing.

From Laos to Thailand: Huay Xai is the nearest border crossing to Thailand from China. It takes only 4 hours driving from Chinese border to Thai border. The road, despite narrow and mountainous, is new and well paved. At Huay Xai, you drive to the immigration office, get your passport stamped and then drive on to the recently opened Fourth Thai-Laos Friendship Bridge, which opened in 2014. The whole process should take like 10 minutes. The bridge is tolled. The toll is 5 Chinese yuan or 20 Thai baht. In Laos, Chinese yuan and Thai baht are accepted almost everywhere. I arrived at the customs in early morning, the customs officer forgot to change the departure date on his stamp (or maybe I forgot to tip him), so the Thai side refused me from entry. I had to drive back to Laos and get the departure date corrected then drive to Thailand side again. At the Thai customs, you have to buy insurance first, then pay for visa on arrival, get your passport and papers stamped. If you are the first time driving in Thailand, they will ask you to take a 5-minute tutor for their driving laws.

From Thailand back to Laos it is about the same, only much more time costly. The Laotian customs is a mess. It took me two hours clear everything at the Thai-Laos border near Nong Khai and Laotian capital Vientiane.

Last edited by feisibuke; October 6th, 2015 at 06:35 PM.
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Old October 6th, 2015, 06:43 PM   #13823
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Originally Posted by feisibuke View Post
http://youtu.be/6qYe345aja0

Laos–China border crossing 20:38–24:58

I have noticed, that you were driving quite slowly, so does the rest of the traffic (40-80 km/h on rural roads, 90-120 km/h on 2X2). It's curiously positive to notice that even on wide straight "new" roads, "not Western" people usually respect the speed limits and are not aggressive, unlike here in many parts of Europe .

By the way, what stuff have you used to film it?
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Old October 6th, 2015, 07:15 PM   #13824
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Originally Posted by John Maynard View Post
I have noticed, that you were driving quite slowly, so does the rest of the traffic (40-80 km/h on rural roads, 90-120 km/h on 2X2). It's curiously positive to notice that even on wide straight "new" roads, "not Western" people usually respect the speed limits and are not aggressive, unlike here in many parts of Europe .

By the way, what stuff have you used to film it?
It is not possible to drive fast in Laos due to sharp curves. And in China, speed radars are everywhere. If caught, for overspeed < 20%, you get 3 points; 20% to 50%, 6 points; > 50%, 12 points; if you get 12 points or more in a single year, you have to go back to driving schools. The speed limit is 120 km/h or lower on expressways. In tunnels, it is usually 60 to 80 km/h. The government doesn't care about slow drivers, 30 km/h overloaded trunk overtaking another 20 km/h overloaded trunk on 120 km/h expressways is not rare, despite 60 km/h lower limit in traffic law, put fast drivers in greater danger.

I used a BMW Advanced Car Eye, that was not a good dashcam for this purpose. I have to write my own program to sync back camera to the front. The video bitrate is also not good enough for roads with many trees. I don't recommend it.
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Old October 7th, 2015, 02:39 AM   #13825
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The point system is also widely applied in Europe, as well as extensive radars use, but penalties varies a lot from country to country: in some of them a 16 km/h speed excess results directly in a driver's license withdrawal and huge fine, bigger excess can put you in jail and forbid you for years of driving; in others a 50 km/h excess gives you only some points and a small fine.
As for overloading, it's also very different in the EU: some place have compulsory weight stations - like in the USA - with huge fine for violators; in others, only very little mobile controls, often announced by CB radio or Internet to other truck drivers, and ridiculously little fines for breakers of law.
IMHO, I prefer to see an overloaded truck driving 40 km/h than 100+km/h, only for the fact that it's extremely dangerous for other road users - per example, braking distance is much higher and deteriorating the brakes much quicker - and the consequences of accidents are much worse. Besides, overloading is bad, because not only is very dangerous, but it's destroy and alter roads very quickly.
Nonetheless, I completely agree with you that very slow trucks on a motorway is a hazardous situation, and some measures have to be taken, like minimal speed, or forbidding truck overtaking in some uphill portions.

Besides that, what hardware would you recommend?
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Old October 8th, 2015, 10:49 PM   #13826
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Originally Posted by John Maynard View Post
I have noticed, that you were driving quite slowly, so does the rest of the traffic (40-80 km/h on rural roads, 90-120 km/h on 2X2). It's curiously positive to notice that even on wide straight "new" roads, "not Western" people usually respect the speed limits and are not aggressive, unlike here in many parts of Europe .

By the way, what stuff have you used to film it?
C'mon, these videos through Thailand and Laos show pure driving anarchy. If you think those drivers are better than fast but disciplined European ones, you have a very biased point of view.
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Old October 9th, 2015, 01:19 PM   #13827
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Syrian bicyclists at an arctic border.

The norwegian-russian border crossing Storskog/Borisoglebsky is becoming busy.
200 people passed last week. 420 syrian bicyclists passed the border in september.


After just a handful of migrant crossings here in the first half of this year, the number “exploded” in September, with 420 asylum seekers pedaling into northern Norway at Storskog, said Stein Kristian Hansen, the police superintendent in charge of the Norwegian border post. Last week alone more than 200 arrived via the Arctic route — a tiny number compared to the thousands arriving daily in Greece and Italy, but a record here.
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Old October 9th, 2015, 10:01 PM   #13828
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Originally Posted by verreme View Post
C'mon, these videos through Thailand and Laos show pure driving anarchy. If you think those drivers are better than fast but disciplined European ones, you have a very biased point of view.
Not all European drivers are disciplined - in many countries: ignorance of traffic law, lack of consideration of the others, bad,dangerous driving habits and selfishness that is common.
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Old October 9th, 2015, 11:55 PM   #13829
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Pictures from last week:

Spain->Gibraltar





Gibraltar->Spain


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Old October 10th, 2015, 01:21 AM   #13830
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Quote:
Originally Posted by John Maynard View Post
Not all European drivers are disciplined - in many countries: ignorance of traffic law, lack of consideration of the others, bad,dangerous driving habits and selfishness that is common.
fatalities in road accidents per billion passenger-km in these countries is much worse than PL (for an example)
so why want that?

Quote:
Originally Posted by John Maynard View Post
I prefer to see an overloaded truck driving 40 km/h than 100+km/h, only for the fact that it's extremely dangerous for other road users - per example, braking distance is much higher and deteriorating the brakes much quicker - and the consequences of accidents are much worse. Besides, overloading is bad, because not only is very dangerous, but it's destroy and alter roads very quickly.
Nonetheless, I completely agree with you that very slow trucks on a motorway is a hazardous situation, and some measures have to be taken, like minimal speed, or forbidding truck overtaking in some uphill portions.

Besides that, what hardware would you recommend?
There is a better and simple solution, proper regulation of motor transport as is seen in "west" countries
The trucks drive 90 (EU) or 100-110 km/h (US, Canada) except on steep motorway grades where extra climbing lanes are provided, drivers are required to take rest periods, trucks are required to be in excellent mechanical condition and overloading is forbidden and monitored. It works well - you never hear of trucks losing wheels and killing people like shows up so often in Russian dashcams or, indeed what was actually happening in "west" in the 1950's.
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Old October 10th, 2015, 02:34 PM   #13831
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Palance View Post
Pictures from last week:

Spain->Gibraltar

Gibraltar->Spain
Which in first place... Well, forget that. I don't want to be banned.
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Old October 10th, 2015, 08:13 PM   #13832
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Just found this, not sure if it's been posted before: https://www.google.es/maps/@46.48218.../data=!3m1!1e3




http://www.panoramio.com/photo/25166356
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Old October 10th, 2015, 09:12 PM   #13833
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Which in first place.
In first place, I liked the automated passport control for pedestrians: Go to a gate, put your passport be scanned, look into the camera, and if everything is OK, the tourniquet will open and you can pass through.

On the way back, I was refused and had to let my passport checked manually y the Spanish police, who just waived me through.
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Old October 10th, 2015, 09:50 PM   #13834
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Palance View Post
In first place, I liked the automated passport control for pedestrians: Go to a gate, put your passport be scanned, look into the camera, and if everything is OK, the tourniquet will open and you can pass through.

On the way back, I was refused and had to let my passport checked manually y the Spanish police, who just waived me through.
does that system works also for id cards?
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Last edited by eucitizen; October 11th, 2015 at 11:45 AM.
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Old October 11th, 2015, 09:34 AM   #13835
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In first place, I liked the automated passport control for pedestrians: Go to a gate, put your passport be scanned, look into the camera, and if everything is OK, the tourniquet will open and you can pass through.
Singapore and Malaysia's entry/exit generally is more simple ,but easily "hacked", fingerprint scan with the bio-passport. only if there's more protections....
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Old October 11th, 2015, 11:48 AM   #13836
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Are there other countries , where among them, aren't border controls, like Schengen in EU, the Ireland - UK CTA or the Belarus - Russia Union?
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Old October 11th, 2015, 02:20 PM   #13837
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Originally Posted by Palance View Post
In first place, I liked the automated passport control for pedestrians: Go to a gate, put your passport be scanned, look into the camera, and if everything is OK, the tourniquet will open and you can pass through.

On the way back, I was refused and had to let my passport checked manually y the Spanish police, who just waived me through.
Palance, can you tell us more about how the checks are now working there? I can't find much on the subject online, and the old system of just one guy in a box was in place when I visited earlier this year. I've got some questions...

- Is the automated passport control operating in both directions?
- Are the automated passport controls inside buildings, or outside?
- Is it mandatory to use the automatic controls, or can you use the manual ones?
- Are the automatic gates for all citizens, or just EU ones?
- Is the entry Customs control building (with x-ray scanners, etc) still in use on the Spanish side? I'm trying to visualise how it works there now - do you have to enter one building for passport control, go outside, then go into the Spanish Customs building?

--

These new controls are very interesting, because they essentially mean that Spain now considers the border to be a proper Schengen border.

Quote:
Originally Posted by eucitizen
Are there other countries , where among them, aren't border controls, like Schengen in EU, the Ireland - UK CTA or the Belarus - Russia Union?
Kosovo-Albania has a mini-Schengen during the summer months, for instance.

I think some South American countries also have some degree of freedom of movement for their own citizens - from what I remember, in many places, as a non-local, you're obliged to actually find and go through border controls.
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Old October 11th, 2015, 04:48 PM   #13838
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Palance, can you tell us more about how the checks are now working there? I can't find much on the subject online, and the old system of just one guy in a box was in place when I visited earlier this year. I've got some questions...

- Is the automated passport control operating in both directions?
- Are the automated passport controls inside buildings, or outside?
- Is it mandatory to use the automatic controls, or can you use the manual ones?
- Are the automatic gates for all citizens, or just EU ones?
- Is the entry Customs control building (with x-ray scanners, etc) still in use on the Spanish side? I'm trying to visualise how it works there now - do you have to enter one building for passport control, go outside, then go into the Spanish Customs building?
It looked like this.
The control was in both directions in a building (Spanish site only). It was not mandatory to use them (the queue for the manual control was even shorter), but I wanted to try them
As far as I remember, control was possible for all passports. And yes, the x-ray still did work
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Old October 12th, 2015, 01:22 AM   #13839
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Are there other countries , where among them, aren't border controls, like Schengen in EU, the Ireland - UK CTA or the Belarus - Russia Union?
Andorra (goods control but not passport control, and nothing if you go to Os de Civis)

I do not know more cases but would be interesting a list of "relaxed customs"
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Old October 12th, 2015, 01:52 AM   #13840
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Are there other countries , where among them, aren't border controls, like Schengen in EU, the Ireland - UK CTA or the Belarus - Russia Union?
San Marino is neither an EU nor a Schengen member. There are no permanent border facilities, and sporadic controls seem to occur very rarely, if any. I have never seen any, nor read about any such experience of others.
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