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Old May 25th, 2017, 02:04 AM   #15361
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Algeria - Tunisia, Oum Theboul checkpoint, Province of El Taref, Algeria.

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Old May 25th, 2017, 03:37 PM   #15362
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@Kpc21 this one is also very interesting example. Looking at the house and its land on the right I wonder in which country belongs. I don't know about the cross border laws in these open border examples.
Definitely this home in the depths is on the Czech side, because under the roof there is car with a Czech license plate and the border runs in that thin ditch.
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Old May 26th, 2017, 07:59 PM   #15363
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I would say, it's a few tens of cm next to the ditch. Why? The position of the border stone.

Anyway, the most interesting thing here is this waste container A really international and Schengen one

How is it with the waste containers in the Czech Republic? Do you typically own one or is it delivered by the waste collection company? Or does it depend on the municipality/company, like in Poland?

Maybe the owner of this Czech booth bought this container from a Pole...
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Old May 28th, 2017, 04:42 PM   #15364
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The tripoint between Romania, Hungary and Serbia is open only one weekend every year (today and tomorrow) and used as a temporarily crossing point. Serbia is not in the EU and Romania not in the Schengen space.
Sorry, the video is in Romanian, but you can see a part of the "famous" wall raised by Hungary at its Serbian border.
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Old May 28th, 2017, 08:50 PM   #15365
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Do they open it for touristic issues at the same time they offer all custom services there?
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Old May 28th, 2017, 09:53 PM   #15366
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I doubt you can legally cross there.
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Old May 28th, 2017, 11:53 PM   #15367
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Do I get it well that the name "Brod" came from a word meaning "a place of crossing the river (without using a bridge)"? Then it's meaning will be even older than the bridge
Yes, it's basically a Slavic word for "ford", meaning a shallow river crossing. There's even some places called Bród in Poland.

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Interestingly, I cannot find such examples at the eastern Polish border. Terespol and Brest are closest to each other, but looking at a map, they seem to be two totally separate towns on both banks of the river. And to have been them also historically.
From what I know, the Eastern border was drawn quite carefully to avoid these problems. However, it's not totally the case - I'm pretty sure Sianki in Bieszczady was split between Poland and the USSR after the war, although it's not a water border.
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Old May 29th, 2017, 12:10 AM   #15368
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Yes, it's basically a Slavic word for "ford", meaning a shallow river crossing. There's even some places called Bród in Poland.
There is a part of Warsaw called Bródno, it comes from it too.
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Old May 29th, 2017, 12:32 AM   #15369
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Do they open it for touristic issues at the same time they offer all custom services there?
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I doubt you can legally cross there.
You can legally cross there one weekend per year, that's all. There is a passport/ID card control though. For the rest of the year it looks like that. As you can see, the road is paved on the Romanian side.

There are some pictures of the tripoint on Google Maps, and the exact place is here.
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Old May 29th, 2017, 01:06 AM   #15370
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Yes, it's basically a Slavic word for "ford", meaning a shallow river crossing. There's even some places called Bród in Poland.
"Brod" also means ship or vessel.
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Old May 29th, 2017, 01:27 AM   #15371
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In Macedonian, I understand. It's well to know - it makes some sense concerning it's origin and the verb "brodzić" (or however it looks like in other Slavic languages).

Wiktionary says that this word means ship also in Serbo-Croatian, or actually, I believe, in the languages which appeared at the moment of the breakup of Yugoslavia.

I am still not really getting how it is with the Serbo-Croatian and the all the local languages. I know that those areas constitute a dialectal continuum, that the language spoken by the local people slightly changes when you move from place to place, and the further someone goes, the more difficult it it to understand others. A similar situation is in Scandinavia. But a language is also a set of words and grammatical rules which constitute it's "official" version, which is used in books, newspapers, in all the media like radio or TV (at least in those countrywide ones) or for lectures at universities. So... Serbo-Croatian was used for those purposes till the breakup of Yugoslavia, and... when the new countries appeared, how did people from each of them know, how the "official" version of their language should look like and differ from the languages of other former Yugoslavia countries? Does anyone still use Serbo-Croatian there, or it's a dead language, replaced by Serbian, Croatian, Slovenian and other languages, which are similar to each other, but have some differences? I understand that none of those languages in its "official" form is used by the people for everyday conversations, they use their local dialects (which is different from Poland, for example, where the meaning of dialects is very little and people normally use the same language as the media in conversations). But it's must be somehow known that, for example, A is the proper word for something in Croatian, and Slovenian has a different word for it - B, how the language should be correctly pronounced, what are the spelling rules and so on.

And another interesting thing is the existence and meaning of dialects in the language at all. Like in Polish, as I already wrote, at least in most of the area of the country, speaking the dialect is something like wearing folk costumes and dancing folk dances. It's a more culture-related thing, not used in practice. Of course, there are some very minor differences in pronunciation, or different words used for some things in different parts of the country (the most notable example is the word for a big wheat-only bread - it's like the word for a doughnut in German, it's different in each city), but there is really few of them, and if I am supposed to talk to someone from the other end of the country, I usually won't notice it at all.

And, supposedly (maybe I am wrong), in Scandinavia or in former Yugoslavia, a person from one end of the country will normally speak visibly different from someone from the other end, and they may even have troubles understanding themselves.

Last edited by Kpc21; May 29th, 2017 at 01:57 AM.
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Old May 29th, 2017, 02:12 AM   #15372
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Borders between Indonesia and Malaysia in Borneo Island

PLBN (Border Checkpoint) Aruk located in Sambas, West Kalimantan(Borneo)




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PLBN (Border Checkpoint) Entikong located in Sanggau, West Kalimantan (Borneo)


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Skip to 1:10


PLBN (Border Checkpoint) Badau located in Kapuas Hulu, West Kalimantan (Borneo)

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Old May 29th, 2017, 03:10 AM   #15373
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Borders Between Indonesia and East Timor in Timor Island

PLBN (Border Checkpoint) Motaain located in Belu, East Nusa Tenggara


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PLBN (Border CHeckpoint) Motamasin located in Malaka, East Nusa Tenggara


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PLBN (Border Checkpoint) Wini located in Wini, East Nusa Timor


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Old May 29th, 2017, 03:31 AM   #15374
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Borders Between Indonesia and Papua New Guinea in Papua Island

New PLBN (Border Post) Skouw located in Jayapura, Papua



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Old May 29th, 2017, 12:00 PM   #15375
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Quote:
Originally Posted by nenea_hartia View Post
You can legally cross there one weekend per year, that's all. There is a passport/ID card control though. For the rest of the year it looks like that. As you can see, the road is paved on the Romanian side.

There are some pictures of the tripoint on Google Maps, and the exact place is here.
Is there anyone in those watchtowers?

Is it possible to walk to the tripoint on normal days?
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Old May 29th, 2017, 12:18 PM   #15376
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Is there anyone in those watchtowers?

Is it possible to walk to the tripoint on normal days?
The watchtower at the Hungarian side is empty if you are referring to the wooden one. Think its an old one from YU times, usually they have more modern equipment than a useless watchtower of 50-100 meters.

You will get a fine of 20 USD but the cool thing is that Police will give you a lift back home

I know this cos I googled it and a tourist wrote his experience when he was there.
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Old May 29th, 2017, 12:54 PM   #15377
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I think you can call Romanian border police in advance and ask them, they may give you permission, but it's important for them to know that you want to walk there
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Old May 29th, 2017, 06:17 PM   #15378
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In Macedonian, I understand. It's well to know - it makes some sense concerning it's origin and the verb "brodzić" (or however it looks like in other Slavic languages).

Wiktionary says that this word means ship also in Serbo-Croatian, or actually, I believe, in the languages which appeared at the moment of the breakup of Yugoslavia.

I am still not really getting how it is with the Serbo-Croatian and the all the local languages. I know that those areas constitute a dialectal continuum, that the language spoken by the local people slightly changes when you move from place to place, and the further someone goes, the more difficult it it to understand others. A similar situation is in Scandinavia. But a language is also a set of words and grammatical rules which constitute it's "official" version, which is used in books, newspapers, in all the media like radio or TV (at least in those countrywide ones) or for lectures at universities. So... Serbo-Croatian was used for those purposes till the breakup of Yugoslavia, and... when the new countries appeared, how did people from each of them know, how the "official" version of their language should look like and differ from the languages of other former Yugoslavia countries? Does anyone still use Serbo-Croatian there, or it's a dead language, replaced by Serbian, Croatian, Slovenian and other languages, which are similar to each other, but have some differences? I understand that none of those languages in its "official" form is used by the people for everyday conversations, they use their local dialects (which is different from Poland, for example, where the meaning of dialects is very little and people normally use the same language as the media in conversations). But it's must be somehow known that, for example, A is the proper word for something in Croatian, and Slovenian has a different word for it - B, how the language should be correctly pronounced, what are the spelling rules and so on.

And another interesting thing is the existence and meaning of dialects in the language at all. Like in Polish, as I already wrote, at least in most of the area of the country, speaking the dialect is something like wearing folk costumes and dancing folk dances. It's a more culture-related thing, not used in practice. Of course, there are some very minor differences in pronunciation, or different words used for some things in different parts of the country (the most notable example is the word for a big wheat-only bread - it's like the word for a doughnut in German, it's different in each city), but there is really few of them, and if I am supposed to talk to someone from the other end of the country, I usually won't notice it at all.

And, supposedly (maybe I am wrong), in Scandinavia or in former Yugoslavia, a person from one end of the country will normally speak visibly different from someone from the other end, and they may even have troubles understanding themselves.
I am not a linguist and this is my obvious knowledge.
Croatian and Serbian are based on a same dialect its called Shtokavian. There are many variants of this dialect and back in YU, Croats used ijekavian as official while Serbs used ekavian writings. Today is the same.
So the word "river" it would be rijeka and reka.
Bosnian is based on same dialect and ijekavian is used by Serbs there also.
So if its shtokavian no matter the differences, the mutuality is very high so there are no problems at all.
Now the differences.
First, due to historical reasons Croatians and Serbians have words that are not find in the one or another.
Second Croats pronounce their ijekavian differently than Serbs or Bosniaks same goes for the others.
Third there are also different dialects, specially in Croatia, where Chakavian and Kajkavian are very different, the latter one is close to Slovenian.


As for MK, the language shares low mutuality with the above mentioned. There are some dialects in east which are mutual with Bulgarian and by some extent also to southern Serbian dialects.
Generally in the schools here back in YU times, ekavian shtokavian was taught and older generations speak it well.
Youngsters understand it very well because there is a ton of music and subtitles and TV channels are Serbian and Croatian. But they find it hard to speak it. As time goes the difference is getting bigger.
As for Slovenian is alien for me, I speak English.
I understand also Bulgarian by a high degree and when I go there I speak my local with them so we get understood very well. With Serbs or Croats I cant speak my local because they will find it hard.
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Brexit is a disaster for Europe because of the English language itself!

The Western Balkans is already in Europe i.e., it is in the heart of Europe and all of these nations want and deserve to have the same chance,
the same security and the same rights as all other citizens of the European family, right on their own continent."

BEEN IN:
MK A AL B BiH BG HR CZ EST F FIN D GR H I LT MNE NL SRB SK SLO E TR PL RKS

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Old May 29th, 2017, 06:29 PM   #15379
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I am not a linguist and this is my obvious knowledge.
...

I understand also Bulgarian by a high degree and when I go there I speak my local with them so we get understood very well.
...
Would it be fair to say that the Macedonian and Bulgarian are the same language, or just "dialects" of the same language, according to the sentence above?
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Old May 29th, 2017, 07:05 PM   #15380
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Let's dont go off-topic, I will tell you what happens when I cross borders in the region.
When I go to Bulgaria I speak my local with no problem. When I go to Greece I can speak at the border my local and they understand me, because there is everyday traffic so they learned.
When I go to ex-yu countries including Kosovo and Slovenia I always speak Serbian or Croatian I am understood very well.
But once when I communicated with Slovenians they got problems so I switched to English.
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Brexit is a disaster for Europe because of the English language itself!

The Western Balkans is already in Europe i.e., it is in the heart of Europe and all of these nations want and deserve to have the same chance,
the same security and the same rights as all other citizens of the European family, right on their own continent."

BEEN IN:
MK A AL B BiH BG HR CZ EST F FIN D GR H I LT MNE NL SRB SK SLO E TR PL RKS

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