daily menu » rate the banner | guess the city | one on oneforums map | privacy policy | DMCA | news magazine | posting guidelines

Go Back   SkyscraperCity > Infrastructure and Mobility Forums > Highways & Autobahns

Highways & Autobahns All about automobility



Global Announcement

As a general reminder, please respect others and respect copyrights. Go here to familiarize yourself with our posting policy.


Reply

 
Thread Tools
Old September 8th, 2017, 02:08 PM   #15801
Alex_ZR
Registered User
 
Alex_ZR's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2008
Location: Zrenjanin
Posts: 2,903
Likes (Received): 4004

My father exchanged Yugoslav dinar to Swiss franc in Switzerland in early 1980s.
__________________

Verso liked this post
Alex_ZR no está en línea   Reply With Quote

Sponsored Links
Old September 8th, 2017, 03:19 PM   #15802
Junkie
Supervisor
 
Join Date: Oct 2007
Location: Skopje
Posts: 1,895
Likes (Received): 791

Before the Yugoslav wars, in the late 80's and early 90's the inflation was sky high and YU printed money like cakes. The industry stalled, Tito was gone and the state introduced sky high money like 20.000 dinars, single paper money.
But... It was nothing, then it was almost certain that the state will collapse when they started to introduce bills of 1 million and even 2 million single dinars money.
You could have bought some dairy products for this bill of 1 million dinars at max...
About the market, my point was that it was possible to buy western products with dinars here, there were jeans and so on... But propaganda worked on high so for example TV's from the early 80's were bought from our country in the then Slovenian Iskra home brand.
__________________
Brexit is a disaster for Europe because of the English language itself!

The Western Balkans is already in Europe i.e., it is in the heart of Europe and all of these nations want and deserve to have the same chance,
the same security and the same rights as all other citizens of the European family, right on their own continent."

BEEN IN:
MK A AL B BiH BG HR CZ EST F FIN D GR H I LT MNE NL SRB SK SLO E TR PL RKS
Junkie no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old September 8th, 2017, 03:45 PM   #15803
Junkie
Supervisor
 
Join Date: Oct 2007
Location: Skopje
Posts: 1,895
Likes (Received): 791

Quote:
Originally Posted by cinxxx View Post
Anybody who entered Serbia can enter Kosovo, there is absolutely no problem doing that. Other than possible long waits (as other borders too) and having to buy the car insurance after entering. Serbs can travel to Kosovo and Kosovars can travel to Serbia very easily, they only have to apply for temporary SRB license plates when entering Serbia. No visas or whatever needed, just ID card.
Don't talk things you don't know .... Maybe you have crossed Albania-Kosovo border but that is the easiest enter to Kosovo. And Albania just like Macedonia, recognize them as independent country and the border is demarcated, so today the situation is just fine.

BUT... During the bombardment of FRY in 1999 and prior, thousands of Kosovars flee to Macedonia and the border was shut down and on 11 June 1999 peacekeeprs entered Kosovo and they controlled this border. This border was the most heavely guarder. In that time Kosovo was still part of FRY and it was defacto part of Serbia and also Montenegro was still not independent.
Also FRY and previosly SFRY had no contacts with Albania for decades and there was even no traffic to the border from Kosovo to Albania so this border was absolutely not guarded. That road that you have passed was build just years ago. In that time there was even no connection.
The UN forces and KFOR are still present there after almost 20 years but they departed from Macedonia-Kosovo border in 2012 I think it was the last contingent once the border got demarcated, although it got demarcated previously.
On the border with Serbia KFOR is still heavily present with arms and ammunition and that is not the same issue. This is not border like you have passed somewhere in Europe!
__________________
Brexit is a disaster for Europe because of the English language itself!

The Western Balkans is already in Europe i.e., it is in the heart of Europe and all of these nations want and deserve to have the same chance,
the same security and the same rights as all other citizens of the European family, right on their own continent."

BEEN IN:
MK A AL B BiH BG HR CZ EST F FIN D GR H I LT MNE NL SRB SK SLO E TR PL RKS
Junkie no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old September 8th, 2017, 03:49 PM   #15804
cinxxx
I ♥ Timişoara
 
cinxxx's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2010
Location: München
Posts: 22,236
Likes (Received): 18299

Did you cross between Serbia and Kosovo? i would have, cause i would have visited Novi Pazar, but i had a rental car and could only go to Albania or Macedonia. i did ask my hosts where i stayed in Kosovo and they told me it's very easy to cross into Serbia. not easy to visit BiH where they need visa. KFOR is also present at serb monastaries, they still patrol in most cities, I've seen them, so what? It's not 1999 anymore! when have you been to Kosovo last time?
cinxxx no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old September 8th, 2017, 04:03 PM   #15805
Junkie
Supervisor
 
Join Date: Oct 2007
Location: Skopje
Posts: 1,895
Likes (Received): 791

You don't know what you are talking about dude. Maybe you have been but for sure you don't know Balkans more than I do.
Admission is REFUSED for Kosovars in Serbia so no Kosovo passport can go there. Also it is not adviced to cross from Serbia to Kosovo because you will have a lot of problems with the car with your insurance and with customs and with the Serbs because they may refuse your exit from Kosovo if you have Kosovo stamp.
So the point was simple, that border is very special it is not recognized as a border and it is heavily controlled.
Before 2 years there was bomb in Kosovska Mitrovica just in front of the control booths.

And check this:
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Visa_r...n_citizens.png
__________________
Brexit is a disaster for Europe because of the English language itself!

The Western Balkans is already in Europe i.e., it is in the heart of Europe and all of these nations want and deserve to have the same chance,
the same security and the same rights as all other citizens of the European family, right on their own continent."

BEEN IN:
MK A AL B BiH BG HR CZ EST F FIN D GR H I LT MNE NL SRB SK SLO E TR PL RKS
Junkie no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old September 8th, 2017, 04:15 PM   #15806
volodaaaa
Registered User
 
volodaaaa's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2013
Location: Bratislava, Slovakia
Posts: 3,231
Likes (Received): 1748

Quote:
Originally Posted by Junkie View Post
You don't know what you are talking about dude. Maybe you have been but for sure you don't know Balkans more than I do.
Admission is REFUSED for Kosovars in Serbia so no Kosovo passport can go there. Also it is not adviced to cross from Serbia to Kosovo because you will have a lot of problems with the car with your insurance and with customs and with the Serbs because they may refuse your exit from Kosovo if you have Kosovo stamp.
So the point was simple, that border is very special it is not recognized as a border and it is heavily controlled.
Before 2 years there was bomb in Kosovska Mitrovica just in front of the control booths.

And check this:
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Visa_r...n_citizens.png
That is completely crazy My country does not recognize Kosovo, but recognizes its travel documents
__________________
Been/drove my car in: SK, CZ, D, A, H, PL, I, F, E, RSM, CH, FL, SLO, HR, SRB, BiH, MK, GR, BG, RO

volodaaaa no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old September 8th, 2017, 04:21 PM   #15807
Alex_ZR
Registered User
 
Alex_ZR's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2008
Location: Zrenjanin
Posts: 2,903
Likes (Received): 4004

Quote:
Originally Posted by Junkie View Post
You don't know what you are talking about dude. Maybe you have been but for sure you don't know Balkans more than I do.
Admission is REFUSED for Kosovars in Serbia so no Kosovo passport can go there. Also it is not adviced to cross from Serbia to Kosovo because you will have a lot of problems with the car with your insurance and with customs and with the Serbs because they may refuse your exit from Kosovo if you have Kosovo stamp.
So the point was simple, that border is very special it is not recognized as a border and it is heavily controlled.
Before 2 years there was bomb in Kosovska Mitrovica just in front of the control booths.

And check this:
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Visa_r...n_citizens.png
Are you serious? People from Kosovo can enter Serbia with their identity card, and vice versa.
Alex_ZR no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old September 8th, 2017, 04:32 PM   #15808
Junkie
Supervisor
 
Join Date: Oct 2007
Location: Skopje
Posts: 1,895
Likes (Received): 791


What about the plane that landed in emergency in Belgrade with Kosovars and they stayed in the plane for whole night?
__________________
Brexit is a disaster for Europe because of the English language itself!

The Western Balkans is already in Europe i.e., it is in the heart of Europe and all of these nations want and deserve to have the same chance,
the same security and the same rights as all other citizens of the European family, right on their own continent."

BEEN IN:
MK A AL B BiH BG HR CZ EST F FIN D GR H I LT MNE NL SRB SK SLO E TR PL RKS
Junkie no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old September 8th, 2017, 04:33 PM   #15809
bogdymol
bogdymod
 
bogdymol's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2010
Posts: 11,182

And I have seen a lot of cars and even some buses with Kosovo plates driving in Hungary, between Budapest and Szeged. I suppose they were continuing down to Belgrade and then Kosovo, otherwise it would make no sense for them to be in that area, so close to the Serbian border.
__________________
Lived, Been, Drove in: A B BG BiH CH CZ D DK E F FIN FL GBZ GR H HR I IRL L M MNE P PL RO RSM S SK SLO SRB UK V
+ Australia, Hong Kong, Macau, Malaysia, New Zealand, Singapore, United Arab Emirates & United States of America
my clinched highways
My wife has just started a travel blog. Check it out here: makeitcount.blog
bogdymol no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old September 8th, 2017, 04:34 PM   #15810
Kpc21
Registered User
 
Join Date: Oct 2008
Location: Łódź
Posts: 18,365
Likes (Received): 6769

Quote:
Originally Posted by Junkie View Post
Before the Yugoslav wars, in the late 80's and early 90's the inflation was sky high and YU printed money like cakes. The industry stalled, Tito was gone and the state introduced sky high money like 20.000 dinars, single paper money.
But... It was nothing, then it was almost certain that the state will collapse when they started to introduce bills of 1 million and even 2 million single dinars money.
We had a similar thing (i.e. hyperinflation) in the early 1990s. But the country didn't collapse, just on the contrary, it got stabilized and while those times damaged the country economically very much, many people made fortunes on this hyperinflation and many others lost much money, in the late 1990s it was changing only to better and it sped up once we joined the EU, sped up even more while we were preparing to the Euro 2012 which we were organizing.

We also had 1 million and 2 million notes:





There were also 50 zł and 100 zł coins. And no grosz (1/100 złoty) coins in practical use.

In 1995, there was a money exchange and 1 zł of the new money was equal 10 thousand zł of the old money.

From then on, the coins we have are: 1 gr, 2 gr, 5 gr, 10 gr, 20 gr, 50 gr, 1 zł, 2 zł and 5 zł. The notes are: 10 zł, 20 zł, 50 zł, 100 zł, 200 zł and last year they introduced a new one: 500 zł.

200 zł and 500 zł notes are quite rare, but all the other values are in everyday use. A few years ago there was an idea to withdraw the 1 gr, 2 gr and 5 gr coins (I am not sure about 5 gr), because the cost of manufacturing them was higher than what they are worth. And they are often used because supermarkets like to set prices of products like 14,99 zł instead of 15 zł to make it look cheaper. But, finally, they just changed the material (now they are more lightweight) and outsourced their production abroad to make it cheaper.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Junkie View Post
About the market, my point was that it was possible to buy western products with dinars here, there were jeans and so on... But propaganda worked on high so for example TV's from the early 80's were bought from our country in the then Slovenian Iskra home brand.
OK, so it's definitely different from Poland. Here, people would like rather buy western products, but they just couldn't afford them. So, concerning the TVs, the first popular color TVs here were Soviet Rubins (based still on valves, not on transistors). Legendary for that they were prone to self-ignition.

In the 1990s, when the western products became commonly available, most families bought western TVs, and, as a result, our industry of consumer electronics (as well as many Polish industries) collapsed. Although my family, quite sensibly, bought a Polish TV in mid-1990s and technically it wasn't worst than the western constructions from the same times. It had a CRT of Philips, some logic components of Siemens and many functions which even now are considered premium. A higher model had even a PiP (picture in picture) function, while mine has parental control, function of turning it on on chosen channel in chosen time or displaying a chosen text on the screen in chosen time. And teletext, which many western TVs still didn't have then. The only drawback is that it didn't support the stereo standard which was later used in Poland (NICAM), instead it supported the standard used e.g. in Czech Republic (A2). But now it has no meaning, as there is no analog TV any more. The TV still works fine (it had only a few minor repairs) and I'm using it in my room with an external digital TV box connected.
__________________

Penn's Woods liked this post

Last edited by Kpc21; September 8th, 2017 at 04:52 PM.
Kpc21 no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old September 8th, 2017, 05:43 PM   #15811
italystf
Registered User
 
Join Date: Aug 2011
Posts: 6,455
Likes (Received): 2185

Quote:
Originally Posted by bogdymol View Post
And I have seen a lot of cars and even some buses with Kosovo plates driving in Hungary, between Budapest and Szeged. I suppose they were continuing down to Belgrade and then Kosovo, otherwise it would make no sense for them to be in that area, so close to the Serbian border.
I've never seen a Kosovan licence plate. I think it's strange because there's plenty of Kosovan immigrants in Italy and plates from other countries of the region can easily be spotted here.
__________________
“The transponder’s personalised signal would be picked up when the car passed through an intersection, and then relayed to a central computer which would calculate the charge according to the intersection and the time of day and add it to the car’s bill” - Nobel Economics Prize winner William Vickrey, proposing a system of electronic tolling for the Washington metropolitan area, 1959
In real life, electronic toll collection was first introduced in Bergen, Norway in 1986, and well into the 21th century many countries still struggle to implement it.
italystf no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old September 8th, 2017, 07:28 PM   #15812
Junkie
Supervisor
 
Join Date: Oct 2007
Location: Skopje
Posts: 1,895
Likes (Received): 791

Quote:
Originally Posted by Kpc21 View Post
OK, so it's definitely different from Poland. Here, people would like rather buy western products, but they just couldn't afford them. So, concerning the TVs, the first popular color TVs here were Soviet Rubins (based still on valves, not on transistors). Legendary for that they were prone to self-ignition.

In the 1990s, when the western products became commonly available, most families bought western TVs, and, as a result, our industry of consumer electronics (as well as many Polish industries) collapsed. Although my family, quite sensibly, bought a Polish TV in mid-1990s and technically it wasn't worst than the western constructions from the same times. It had a CRT of Philips, some logic components of Siemens and many functions which even now are considered premium. A higher model had even a PiP (picture in picture) function, while mine has parental control, function of turning it on on chosen channel in chosen time or displaying a chosen text on the screen in chosen time. And teletext, which many western TVs still didn't have then. The only drawback is that it didn't support the stereo standard which was later used in Poland (NICAM), instead it supported the standard used e.g. in Czech Republic (A2). But now it has no meaning, as there is no analog TV any more. The TV still works fine (it had only a few minor repairs) and I'm using it in my room with an external digital TV box connected.
SFRY was socialist federation, so it had some 'privileges' not just political for traveling for an example, but also the market was more open and stuff like that. I know very good that we had western products and only dinars for fine them. But that market was limited it was not like what we have today. And the prices were good, and the good point you made is that when going abroad citizen of a communist country would surely find problems with the cost of living and general prices in the western world. That was also the case for YU's people.
Another thing is that we had home 'brands' and often was said that these are the best in the world, mentality that is still preserved to the many even today, they used to say that in those era the products lasted forever. But the fact was that there was no competition and lack of competition made one brand to be favorable.
__________________
Brexit is a disaster for Europe because of the English language itself!

The Western Balkans is already in Europe i.e., it is in the heart of Europe and all of these nations want and deserve to have the same chance,
the same security and the same rights as all other citizens of the European family, right on their own continent."

BEEN IN:
MK A AL B BiH BG HR CZ EST F FIN D GR H I LT MNE NL SRB SK SLO E TR PL RKS
Junkie no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old September 8th, 2017, 07:55 PM   #15813
Kpc21
Registered User
 
Join Date: Oct 2008
Location: Łódź
Posts: 18,365
Likes (Received): 6769

Quote:
Originally Posted by Junkie View Post
they used to say that in those era the products lasted forever.
Because it's true, but it refers to both communist and western goods It was before the producers started planning the lifetime of the products.

Another thing is such a situation like we have now would never happen in a communist country (with communist economy, I'm not talking about China), because the production in communism isn't revenue-oriented. Of course it doesn't make it superior since the revenue-oriented production for a free market is, at least, able to satisfy the demand, unlike it was in communism, when, for example, someone who ordered a car, had to wait a few years for it.

Polish (and Yugoslav probably too) products from those times were often of much higher quality than the crap sold nowadays, even under known western brands, which is planned that it shall last so many years and then it can break down because the warranty is not valid any more anyway.

Last edited by Kpc21; September 8th, 2017 at 08:02 PM.
Kpc21 no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old September 8th, 2017, 08:24 PM   #15814
Junkie
Supervisor
 
Join Date: Oct 2007
Location: Skopje
Posts: 1,895
Likes (Received): 791

Kpc21 you are right, I know tons of people here who are still using for example washing machines from the socialist era like 35 years old or some things like radio devices and so on, and they are so proud of their durability and life-span :-)

I will go back on this thread now, about Kosovo when KFOR was guarding the border with Macedonia there were tons of illegals and ammunition entering both countries, and this was the main channel back then, because Kosovo was warzone and really it was very nasty. No one even imagined that should go and cross the border, in fact in the period after 1999 for some 2-3 years you needed papers from UNMIK which was UN's body to register in order to go there. And Kosovars used to flee here because the situation there was really bad.
Today things are much improved, and it is safe to go, I have seen many strangers from western world.
__________________
Brexit is a disaster for Europe because of the English language itself!

The Western Balkans is already in Europe i.e., it is in the heart of Europe and all of these nations want and deserve to have the same chance,
the same security and the same rights as all other citizens of the European family, right on their own continent."

BEEN IN:
MK A AL B BiH BG HR CZ EST F FIN D GR H I LT MNE NL SRB SK SLO E TR PL RKS
Junkie no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old September 8th, 2017, 08:24 PM   #15815
Ermir
Registered User
 
Ermir's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2008
Location: Placentia/Pärma/アルバニア
Posts: 6,105
Likes (Received): 2814

Quote:
Originally Posted by italystf View Post
I've never seen a Kosovan licence plate. I think it's strange because there's plenty of Kosovan immigrants in Italy and plates from other countries of the region can easily be spotted here.
Neither of these is true. Not only there are very few Kosovars in Italy, even Albania's proper license plates are extremely rare since most of us have bought our cars here. The only common EE license plates here are those of Romania.
__________________
Survival of the dankest.

Last edited by Ermir; September 8th, 2017 at 09:02 PM.
Ermir está en línea ahora   Reply With Quote
Old September 8th, 2017, 08:35 PM   #15816
italystf
Registered User
 
Join Date: Aug 2011
Posts: 6,455
Likes (Received): 2185

Many modern things (cars, appliances) are more vulnerable than the old one because they are more complex, with more components, especially electronics. If a device is made by 1000 parts instead of 200 is more probably that something will break.

Moreover, manifacturers aren't interested in investing in increasing the lifespan of products for different reasons:
- the least a product lasts, the more often it has to be replaced;
- making low-quality devices is cheaper, so these devices are more competitive in the market: customers have info about the product's price, not about its lifespan, so a bad quality 500€ device sells much better than a 1000€ device that would last twice;
- in many cases customers aren't interested in long lifespans of their devices, as they plan to replace them anyway due to obsolescence so they aren't willing to pay extra for more durable products.

EU could issue some laws to reduce the problem of planned obsolescence, for example increasing the warranty from 2 to 5 years or setting minimum technical standards for different devices. However, in a such scenario, 80€ smartphones or 300€ laptops would probably become things of the past, and price of technology will increase maybe to the level of a decade ago.
__________________
“The transponder’s personalised signal would be picked up when the car passed through an intersection, and then relayed to a central computer which would calculate the charge according to the intersection and the time of day and add it to the car’s bill” - Nobel Economics Prize winner William Vickrey, proposing a system of electronic tolling for the Washington metropolitan area, 1959
In real life, electronic toll collection was first introduced in Bergen, Norway in 1986, and well into the 21th century many countries still struggle to implement it.

Kpc21 liked this post
italystf no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old September 8th, 2017, 08:41 PM   #15817
italystf
Registered User
 
Join Date: Aug 2011
Posts: 6,455
Likes (Received): 2185

Quote:
Originally Posted by Ermir View Post
Neither of these is true. Not only there very few Kosovars in Italy even Albania's proper license plates are extremely rare since most of us have bought our cars here. The only common EE license plates here are those of Romania.
In NE Italy I can see plates from pretty much all over EE. Not every day, of course, but from time to time yes. Except Kosovo. I've even seen a car from Transnistria in Austria.
SLO, HR, RO, H, CZ, SK, PL are all very common.
__________________
“The transponder’s personalised signal would be picked up when the car passed through an intersection, and then relayed to a central computer which would calculate the charge according to the intersection and the time of day and add it to the car’s bill” - Nobel Economics Prize winner William Vickrey, proposing a system of electronic tolling for the Washington metropolitan area, 1959
In real life, electronic toll collection was first introduced in Bergen, Norway in 1986, and well into the 21th century many countries still struggle to implement it.
italystf no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old September 8th, 2017, 09:05 PM   #15818
darko06
Registered User
 
Join Date: Nov 2009
Posts: 773
Likes (Received): 149

Quote:
Originally Posted by Kpc21 View Post
Yeah - but how much could you buy in Italy for your typical salary from Yugoslavia?

In Poland it was also illegal to have dollars (and other western currencies) in the Stalin era, from what I have read. There was something called "dollar vouchers" which were paid out to the people getting money from the west (inheritance, sailors, foreign pensions etc.) instead of normal money. And they could buy western goods for them in special shops.

Later, it was also not allowed, but the government did not control it so strictly, it became also allowed to sell those vouchers. So people wanting to sell or buy dollars were announcing they want to sell or buy the dollar vouchers. At least from what I have read.

If someone from Poland went to the west (which wasn't easy but wasn't impossible) and wanted to bring something from there, it was common to take some goods from Poland and sell them there, otherwise you just couldn't afford the western goods.

There is some more info here: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bon_Towarowy_PeKaO
I remember those 'Bon Towarowy' very well. As a student I was at the student exchange to Krakow somewhere in Summer 1985, although I didn't remember on what purpose exactly. There existed so-called Pewex warehouses, where all the prices (luxury goods, cigarettes, perfumes, Hi-Fi equipment etc.) were in US$. If someone wanted to buy goods in other convertible currencies (i.e. Pound Sterling, Deutschmark, Italian Lira, Yugoslav Dinar - you won't believe, for Pewex the YUD was convertible!), I suppose that this person was forced to change this currency into US$ and buy after that. Anyhow, after the buying your precious stuff you received exchange in Bony Towarowy, not in the convertible currency in which you were paid. I took one denominated in 1 American Cent home to show it around.
Before the entrance there was a lot of Polish people begging us to buy them a package of cigarettes or a pair of nylons or similar and lured us to exchange the Communist Zloty at the course 1:4-1:5, similar as in the GDR. Our student hosts told us that the police usually make raids once in two weeks, however irregularly, so we were indirectly advised not to make business with those people.
Seeing that in those times I really congratulate to Polish people to finally went to West in 1990s. (Jescze Polska nie zginiela!)
__________________

Penn's Woods, Kanadzie liked this post

Last edited by darko06; September 8th, 2017 at 09:45 PM.
darko06 no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old September 8th, 2017, 09:26 PM   #15819
darko06
Registered User
 
Join Date: Nov 2009
Posts: 773
Likes (Received): 149

If I remember well, in 1985 you may buy in Poland LP records of Bill Haley in Polish store for Zloty, although all songs were from 1955. Or you may buy Grundig portable radio cassette recorder all compatible with the West, although the FM frequency was 69-87 MHz instead of 88-108 MHz (the Commies did that purposely, to force their population not to listen Western FM radio stations, whose transmitters easily covered all the ex DDR and western parts of Poland). However, with these radios one could spy police cars in the West.
darko06 no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old September 8th, 2017, 09:31 PM   #15820
darko06
Registered User
 
Join Date: Nov 2009
Posts: 773
Likes (Received): 149

Quote:
Originally Posted by Kpc21 View Post
We had a similar thing (i.e. hyperinflation) in the early 1990s. ...
...

OK, so it's definitely different from Poland. Here, people would like rather buy western products, but they just couldn't afford them. So, concerning the TVs, the first popular color TVs here were Soviet Rubins (based still on valves, not on transistors). Legendary for that they were prone to self-ignition.

In the 1990s, when the western products became commonly available, most families bought western TVs, and, as a result, our industry of consumer electronics (as well as many Polish industries) collapsed. Although my family, quite sensibly, bought a Polish TV in mid-1990s and technically it wasn't worst than the western constructions from the same times. It had a CRT of Philips, some logic components of Siemens and many functions which even now are considered premium. A higher model had even a PiP (picture in picture) function, while mine has parental control, function of turning it on on chosen channel in chosen time or displaying a chosen text on the screen in chosen time. And teletext, which many western TVs still didn't have then. The only drawback is that it didn't support the stereo standard which was later used in Poland (NICAM), instead it supported the standard used e.g. in Czech Republic (A2). But now it has no meaning, as there is no analog TV any more. The TV still works fine (it had only a few minor repairs) and I'm using it in my room with an external digital TV box connected.
With the television there was another but similar issue. Soviet bloc imposed SECAM
(French De Gaulle's standard; from German Wikipedia: "Die Entwicklung von SECAM in Frankreich war politisch motiviert, um die einheimische Geräteindustrie vor Importen zu schützen. In diesem Zusammenhang wird die Abkürzung scherzhaft als „Système élégant contre l’Amérique“, (dt. „Elegantes System gegen Amerika“) gedeutet. ... Wegen des oben erwähnten „SECAM-Feuers“ wurde SECAM scherzhaft auch mit „System Even Crueler (than the) American Method“ (Ein noch grausameres System (als die) amerikanische Methode) übersetzt.")
instead of PAL, again to make the Western TV program unwatchable. Today only France, Russia, Moldova and Belarus, and finally of course all former French colonies in Africa (Morocco, Tunisia, etc. etc.) have SECAM as TV standard. The Americans, Canada, Mexico, Western South America, Japan, Korea, Taiwan, Thailand and Philipinnes have NTSC.

Last edited by darko06; September 8th, 2017 at 09:56 PM.
darko06 no está en línea   Reply With Quote


Reply

Tags
highways, motorways

Thread Tools

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Related topics on SkyscraperCity


All times are GMT +2. The time now is 06:20 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.11 Beta 4
Copyright ©2000 - 2018, vBulletin Solutions Inc.
Feedback Buttons provided by Advanced Post Thanks / Like (Pro) - vBulletin Mods & Addons Copyright © 2018 DragonByte Technologies Ltd.

vBulletin Optimisation provided by vB Optimise (Pro) - vBulletin Mods & Addons Copyright © 2018 DragonByte Technologies Ltd.

SkyscraperCity ☆ In Urbanity We trust ☆ about us | privacy policy | DMCA policy

tech management by Sysprosium