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Old September 27th, 2017, 12:51 AM   #15961
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I can say about Euros here in my region. When you drive a car and pass thru Serbia, Macedonia you can pay with Euro coins and credit card on the tools. Now just recently in my country they introduced paying with credit card
So you dont need to stop at the border for some scam fees to change in local currencies. Tourists that go to vacation and pass here can bring euro coins. BUT the pegging to local currency is not the same so there is a still small scam although this is state regulated, so the thing is tourists pay some fee plus because the euro pay tool price is pegged to the local and not otherwise.
Now for petrol you cant pay in Euro... Dollar is almost never used and never accepted.
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Old September 27th, 2017, 01:04 AM   #15962
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One question.... do they set price in euro in a credit card machine???????

This is.... some banks can offer you an account in a different currency. It is not often but I use a bank that offers account in USD, CHF and JPY. But it is electronic money only. This is... you make exchange, keep it (maybe euro is down or upper) and exchange again. They will not give you a credit card to pay in those currencies.

This is, all cards are in euro. If you go to a country where currency is euro, paying is fee... but for other currencies they will have fees.

In this case it is important to know if a bank account can "receive" via payments money with credit card in euro. Owner will have an account in euro and will decide how to deal with them


Once I saw a French credit card system 5 km away from the border. It was a petrol station and I was the only car with a national car plate inside. All people were invited to pay even in cash or with a French credit card system. It was the same price for customer but they would join all data and send data even by internet. Therefore, they should had to have an account in the nearest French village but will save a great deal of commisions (and bank transfers are free within EU even if different currency)

P.S. When I went to pay I remembered staff to provide me a Spanish card system.... (or they will pay a "fine" to forget it!!)
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Old September 27th, 2017, 03:23 AM   #15963
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Quote:
Originally Posted by alserrod View Post
This is.... some banks can offer you an account in a different currency. It is not often but I use a bank that offers account in USD, CHF and JPY. But it is electronic money only. This is... you make exchange, keep it (maybe euro is down or upper) and exchange again. They will not give you a credit card to pay in those currencies.
As I wrote in my previous post, you can do it in Poland too, and you can get a debit card without any problem. I am not sure about a credit one, but a Polish debit card (which is typically Master Card or Visa) will work without any problems practically in the whole EU, except for the points where they accept only the local inventions, like the German "EC" cards. In Germany it's treated just as a credit card (as they don't know any debit cards other than those their "EC", which are Maestro simultaneously).

Actually, some banks offer even multi-currency debit cards, which detect in which currency the payment is made and either your account in PLN or in foreign currency is charged.

The only thing you may have difficulty with is withdrawing the money in a foreign currency while you are in Poland. Especially if the account is in a bank focused on online service rather than on physical offices in the street. The ATMs in Poland withdraw PLN only. Rarely they withdraw also euro, but then the amount of money is converted from euro to PLN and than back to euro, so it makes no sense.

Concerning the money exchange, in Poland it's much more popular to use separate exchange offices (called "kantor" - a word cognate to "counter") rather than banks for money exchange. They normally offer better exchange rates. You have an exchange office in each shopping mall, and also in city centers and at the borders.

But, for example, while going to Bulgaria I was warned that there is a branch of exchange offices there which is cheating on the exchange rate and to use banks for money exchange in Bulgaria, because it's much safer.

Trying to pay in euro in Poland rather won't be a good idea. Big supermarket chains have information next to cash desks that they accept euro (but the change is given in PLN), but at all other points it rather won't be possible to pay in euro.

Last edited by Kpc21; September 27th, 2017 at 03:30 AM.
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Old September 27th, 2017, 08:42 AM   #15964
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Originally Posted by Kpc21 View Post
As I wrote in my previous post, you can do it in Poland too, and you can get a debit card without any problem. I am not sure about a credit one, but a Polish debit card (which is typically Master Card or Visa) will work without any problems practically in the whole EU, except for the points where they accept only the local inventions, like the German "EC" cards. In Germany it's treated just as a credit card (as they don't know any debit cards other than those their "EC", which are Maestro simultaneously).

Actually, some banks offer even multi-currency debit cards, which detect in which currency the payment is made and either your account in PLN or in foreign currency is charged.

The only thing you may have difficulty with is withdrawing the money in a foreign currency while you are in Poland. Especially if the account is in a bank focused on online service rather than on physical offices in the street. The ATMs in Poland withdraw PLN only. Rarely they withdraw also euro, but then the amount of money is converted from euro to PLN and than back to euro, so it makes no sense.

Concerning the money exchange, in Poland it's much more popular to use separate exchange offices (called "kantor" - a word cognate to "counter") rather than banks for money exchange. They normally offer better exchange rates. You have an exchange office in each shopping mall, and also in city centers and at the borders.

But, for example, while going to Bulgaria I was warned that there is a branch of exchange offices there which is cheating on the exchange rate and to use banks for money exchange in Bulgaria, because it's much safer.

Trying to pay in euro in Poland rather won't be a good idea. Big supermarket chains have information next to cash desks that they accept euro (but the change is given in PLN), but at all other points it rather won't be possible to pay in euro.
True. When I passed there from Greece this year, I intended to buy a vignette on a border crossing. Some border crossings in Bulgaria have the additional booths so that you may pay directly from the car as a drive-in: I assume these booths are official as the lady behind the desk on my way to Greece wore a blouse with some logo with the Bulgarian CoA - the official price for a vignette is 8 € this year . Anyway, no booth were on my way back, just some kiosks with suspicious vendors. I was in rush so I dropped by and bought the vignette - it costed 10 €.
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Old September 27th, 2017, 11:56 AM   #15965
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I remember this scam... Arrived at the CH border near Karlsruhe and the vignette was CHF20 or €20... I had Euros.
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Old September 27th, 2017, 12:02 PM   #15966
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That must've been a giant scam. There is no Swiss border anywhere near Karlsruhe and the vignette is 40 CHF
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Old September 27th, 2017, 01:37 PM   #15967
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LOL... wasn't looking at the map, just had been to Karlsruhe and continued on to CH. This was around 2004. Weil-am-Rhine.
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Old September 27th, 2017, 01:54 PM   #15968
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Welcome to Belgium...
https://goo.gl/maps/nQSPt2MmiQ12
Typical Belgian border crossing where you are greeted with these signs following each other on a short interval:
- "België" with European flag
- Nationwide speed limits sign
- Nationwide truck overtaking probibition during rain sign
- "Welcome to the province of Antwerp" sign
- Vlaanderen with Flemish vlag, with redundant small "provincie Antwerpen" sign

And this picture is from 2009, before the introduction of truck toll. Now there is an additional sign for that as well.

What a contrast when you look in the other direction.
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Old September 27th, 2017, 02:22 PM   #15969
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jdb.2 View Post
Welcome to Belgium...
https://goo.gl/maps/nQSPt2MmiQ12
Typical Belgian border crossing where you are greeted with these signs following each other on a short interval:
- "België" with European flag
- Nationwide speed limits sign
- Nationwide truck overtaking probibition during rain sign
- "Welcome to the province of Antwerp" sign
- Vlaanderen with Flemish vlag, with redundant small "provincie Antwerpen" sign

And this picture is from 2009, before the introduction of truck toll. Now there is an additional sign for that as well.

What a contrast when you look in the other direction.
Signage kn Belgium is also quite ugly compared with Dutch ones. The problem is, that belgium consists of 2 smaller countries in it, with each its own signage and rules... Hence the first belgian sign as a federal sign, then you have the Flemish sign als part of flanders, followed by another sign for the province. These signs show he political and regional layers of Belgium perfectly lol...
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Old September 27th, 2017, 02:46 PM   #15970
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https://www.google.es/maps/@42.79579...2!8i6656?hl=es




Welcome to Spain, current N-330a Somport summit (St.James' pilgrim path). Border atop, booths not removed but without use neither any control.

In the middle of the border, "Custom and Police cooperation centre" in French and Spanish despite it is just that building and close!! (when border operating they were only booths for both sides).

In the booths but looking to France, name of summit and 1609m as an official sign

Just after booths, "Spain" and EU flag
10m ahead "Candanchu" in the right side. It would be N-330b or so... Until late 90ish road was in that direction.

30m later, Jaca, Canfranc ahead, Astun (ski resort) in the left. Old sign because it says N-330 and it is N-330a (N-330 is through tunnel) and E-7 is also there too.
You came from France and Zaragoza (in French) was pointed everywhere, sometimes Huesca too... you arrive to Spain and... they point Jaca only. Just to confuse??? (should you turn Astun, it is 2 km and must back again, should you enter in Candanchu, arrive to N-330a later... no problem in a valley where it is just down... but strongly weird)

- In the middle of Astun cross, some mettres later, "Astun" with tiny letters

- Just later, general sign about speeds allowed in Spain

- Later, overpass allowed, milestone of N-330 km 675 and E7, and later overpass not allowed

- 8% sign to advice you

- Brake lane in 1 km sign (should you are in a truck and have problems with brakes, you can enter there and will be stopped by land and stones avoiding accidents)... and overpass allowed again

- Recommended driving to 60
- Overpass forbidden

- Overpass allowed

- Region of Aragon, Province of Huesca



Welcome to France

- Border, same text in the middle
- in the right, start of Somport-Canfranc-Bedous SNCF line by bus with schedules
- No allowed to go in the parking located in the right
- Standard speed sign
- In the same one, a sign saying forbidden to drive from 8 to 12 due to a strongly well known cycling tour (not allowed in Spain also, btw). Picture and sign is from 2012
- 5 m later, Info Traffic with FM to heard for traffic in the area (no much radio indeed in the Pyrenees)
- Sign of national park and regulations
- Forbidden to trucks over 3,5tons or dangerous except if local traffic (reaching there I wonder how to make an U-turn)
- Welcome to the departement and their slogan

and nothing else... but all in .... maybe 30 m??????


next sign will be an old mile-STONE




Who wins?





(forgot to say that France has not standard sign that you entered in France... but you entered in the departement and in the national park and so on) and in the left there is a little restaurant with a 15 euro menu and can see dishes from the road
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Old September 27th, 2017, 03:40 PM   #15971
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BlackC View Post
Signage kn Belgium is also quite ugly compared with Dutch ones. The problem is, that belgium consists of 2 smaller countries in it, with each its own signage and rules... Hence the first belgian sign as a federal sign, then you have the Flemish sign als part of flanders, followed by another sign for the province. These signs show he political and regional layers of Belgium perfectly lol...
If you look at the other side, the Netherlands also has signs for speed limit, "Welkom in Nederland", "Welkom in Brabant". They are just spaced further away.

The only critical information after a border crossing is the speed limit and truck overtaking limit sign, the other signs can be places further away, instead of cluttering the important information.


Province of Antwerp sign is redundant, it is combined with the "Vlaanderen" sign.
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Old September 27th, 2017, 04:51 PM   #15972
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jdb.2 View Post
Welcome to Belgium...
https://goo.gl/maps/nQSPt2MmiQ12
Typical Belgian border crossing where you are greeted with these signs following each other on a short interval:
- "België" with European flag
- Nationwide speed limits sign
- Nationwide truck overtaking probibition during rain sign
- "Welcome to the province of Antwerp" sign
- Vlaanderen with Flemish vlag, with redundant small "provincie Antwerpen" sign

And this picture is from 2009, before the introduction of truck toll. Now there is an additional sign for that as well.

What a contrast when you look in the other direction.
Check out the series of signs when you enter Ontario from Quebec on Autoroute 40/Highway 417

https://goo.gl/maps/Aa3Q6TLDNNC2

They start here and due to the fact that the signs are in english and french there are a lot of signs. In the other direction english isn't on the signs.
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Old September 27th, 2017, 05:09 PM   #15973
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That must've been a giant scam. There is no Swiss border anywhere near Karlsruhe and the vignette is 40 CHF
The nearest one to Karlsruhe is in Basel.
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Old September 27th, 2017, 06:30 PM   #15974
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Originally Posted by alserrod View Post
....
That was reason we kept Francs for one year to another and usually coming back we used to change currencies in France to Francs. We will "block" that money until next summer but will save one exchange fee.
....
I have two little Ziploc bags in the drawer I keep my passport in. One contains nearly $50 in Canadian cash (I was surprised, when I looked at it last week because I was considering going to Niagara Falls, that it was so much); the other contains some euro coins. (That one, I haven't looked at lately, so I have no idea about the amount.) I just slip it into my bag when I'm going to leave the country. This way I'm not worrying about changing money back (of course, it wouldn't make sense for a place I may never be again), and have at least some money on hand the next time I'm there.
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Old September 27th, 2017, 06:31 PM   #15975
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One question.... do they set price in euro in a credit card machine???????
This is another scam I guess. Many tourists are caught in scams here because of this, they may set the price in local currency and the rate would be higher that the equivalent to euros.
Also sometimes it is common for tool paying to return to you local currency if you dont provide the right coin.
About vignettes this happened to me in Bulgaria after the border I didn't had BGN's so I provided Euros and said they had no change so they caught you alive 2 Euros bonus
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The Western Balkans is already in Europe i.e., it is in the heart of Europe and all of these nations want and deserve to have the same chance,
the same security and the same rights as all other citizens of the European family, right on their own continent."

BEEN IN:
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Old September 27th, 2017, 06:32 PM   #15976
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When I was in Germany, I always used Polish coins for shopping carts so as not to waste those from my wallet, to have what to pay with for the shopping.

Same I did for some time in Poland - using Euro coins for the shopping carts.

How does it work in the countries where even 1 unit of their currency is a note (e.g. Romania, where the biggest coin is 0.50 RON)? Do you have only coin-less shopping carts or do your carts just accept 0.50 RON (or even smaller) coins?

Because in Poland, it's typically 1 PLN and 2 PLN what the carts accept, and it's approximately so that 1 PLN = 1 RON.
Wait, paying for shopping carts?
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Old September 27th, 2017, 07:13 PM   #15977
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Wait, paying for shopping carts?
No, we don't pay anything for them. We get the coin (or coin-sized token) back when we put the used cart back in its place. In that way people don't let carts all over the parking lot.
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In real life, electronic toll collection was first introduced in Bergen, Norway in 1986, and well into the 21th century many countries still struggle to implement it.
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Old September 27th, 2017, 07:15 PM   #15978
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Ah. Most places I shop you leave the cart near the car (there are even places in the parking lot that you're meant to drop them off) and some employee of the store rounds them up. Or of course the next customer can take one and use it.

This sort of thing:
http://www.nationalcart.com/wp-conte...art_corral.jpg
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Old September 27th, 2017, 07:17 PM   #15979
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Ah. Most places I shop you leave the cart near the car (there are even places in the parking lot that you're meant to drop them off) and some employee of the store rounds them up. Or of course the next customer can take one and use it.
I've never seen anything like that. Here it's normal to put it back after having unloaded it in your car.
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In real life, electronic toll collection was first introduced in Bergen, Norway in 1986, and well into the 21th century many countries still struggle to implement it.
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Old September 27th, 2017, 07:28 PM   #15980
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In big supermarkets, which we call hypermarkets - like Auchan, Tesco, Carrefour, Leclerc, Real (Tesco and Carrefour happen to be also in smaller versions) we also have such places on the parking lot.

But still you must insert a coin and you get it back when you leave your cart in the proper place - so that all the carts are connected with each other.

This is how it works:







You insert a coin, the chain connecting the cart with the next one is released.

In Poland I haven't heard about using tokens for them. Normally you can insert 1 PLN or 2 PLN coin. Or 0,50 EUR, I'm not sure if 1 EUR also works.

I am not sure about other European countries, but in Poland we normally distinguish supermarkets and hypermarkets. Supermarkets are stores of the size of Lidl or Aldi (the biggest brand is a local one, although owned by Portuguese - Biedronka, we also have Lidl, Aldi, Tesco, Carrefour, Netto and other ones, but they are less common) are called supermarkets, but those of the size of Auchan or Real (I am not sure but I believe Walmart in the US is comparable) are called here hypermarkets.

But we are going off the topic again...
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