daily menu » rate the banner | guess the city | one on oneforums map | privacy policy | DMCA | news magazine | posting guidelines

Go Back   SkyscraperCity > Infrastructure and Mobility Forums > Highways & Autobahns

Highways & Autobahns All about automobility



Global Announcement

As a general reminder, please respect others and respect copyrights. Go here to familiarize yourself with our posting policy.


Reply

 
Thread Tools
Old November 11th, 2014, 09:15 PM   #281
whatsuplucas
Registered User
 
Join Date: Jun 2013
Location: São Paulo
Posts: 298
Likes (Received): 143

I think the solution for traffic jams on Miklabraut would be having no barriers between the east and west lanes. Without the barriers, one or two lanes from the other side of the road could be used to improve traffic flow. However, I know it's not very feasible, since there are a lot of bridges and there's grass in the middle of the road.
whatsuplucas no está en línea   Reply With Quote

Sponsored Links
Old November 12th, 2014, 12:53 PM   #282
Bjarki
Registered User
 
Join Date: Sep 2009
Location: Iceland
Posts: 373
Likes (Received): 159

Quote:
Originally Posted by Suburbanist View Post
I wonder why the Eastern coast of Iceland, which is glacier- and volcano-free, never developed a major secondary city.
It's a good question. I think conditions were not very good for urbanisation in the east during the critical 19th century when Reykjavík and other important towns like Akureyri and Ísafjörður started growing. Seyðisfjörður was the most important town in the east at that time but never got bigger than having around 1000 people. Back then, transport on land was very primitive with no roads to speak of so the sea was the primary transport. You will notice on a map of Iceland that almost every significant town is located on the coast. Selfoss and Egilsstaðir are notable exceptions of inland towns but they are also very young, Selfoss only started forming in the 1930s and Egilsstaðir not until the 1950s. Those places were only made possible by improved roads. The coast in the east doesn't have many good spots where a major town or city could form and it also did not help that in 1875 there was a large explosive eruption at Askja that dumped volcanic ash all over the east and pushed a lot of people there to move to America.
Bjarki no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old November 17th, 2014, 03:09 PM   #283
NordikNerd
Rail & Road traveller
 
NordikNerd's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2011
Location: Linköping
Posts: 2,747
Likes (Received): 1408


Miklabraut road in the evening rush hour.





The Reykjanesbraut Expressway connecting Central Reykjavik with the Keflavik Intl. Airport. Speed limit is 80km/h.

Last edited by NordikNerd; November 19th, 2014 at 10:34 AM.
NordikNerd no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old November 17th, 2014, 10:33 PM   #284
xrtn2
Registered User
 
xrtn2's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2011
Location: Valadares, Brazil
Posts: 19,673
Likes (Received): 17490

xrtn2 no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old November 18th, 2014, 11:47 PM   #285
Bart_LCY
Arae et foci
 
Bart_LCY's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2006
Location: EGLC
Posts: 1,174
Likes (Received): 820

Quote:
Originally Posted by NordikNerd View Post
The Reykjanesbraut Expressway connecting Central Reykjavik with the Keflavik Intl. Airport. Speed limit is 80km/h.
It does not have a status of an expressway

5 km west from where this picture was taken you have numerous non-grade separated crossings in Hafnarfjörður

And outside Höfuðborgarsvæðið the speed limit is 90 km/h
__________________
אני תומך בישראל
Bart_LCY no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old November 22nd, 2014, 09:40 PM   #286
NordikNerd
Rail & Road traveller
 
NordikNerd's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2011
Location: Linköping
Posts: 2,747
Likes (Received): 1408



Miklabraut, Reykjavik. Its remarkable that a 6 lane road in a city with only 120.000 inhabitants is so congested. One reason may be the urban sprawl resulting in the car ownership beeing as high as 641 cars per 1 000 inhabitants, which is a lot higher than the swedish average of 464 cars per 1000 inhabitants.
NordikNerd no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old November 23rd, 2014, 07:31 AM   #287
RV
Registered User
 
Join Date: Oct 2007
Location: Porvoo
Posts: 726
Likes (Received): 275

Seems like Green ideology has not came to Iceland, at least yet. I like it Car is the sign of progress and personal freedom. They must remove those traffic lights they have.
__________________

Blackraven liked this post
RV no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old November 23rd, 2014, 09:28 AM   #288
bigic
(-_-) -<>- ♂♂
 
bigic's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2014
Location: Bela Palanka, Serbia
Posts: 363
Likes (Received): 136

Quote:
Originally Posted by RV View Post
They must remove those traffic lights they have.
You really want to see pedestrians trying to cross the street while people in car lanes are driving like on highway? Or cars crashing as the result of a busy unsignalled intersection?
Or you suggest a gigantic feat of rebuilding all main city streets into highways, with grade-separated pedestrian crossings and intersection?
Послато са ZTE Blade Q Mini уз помоћ Тапатока
bigic no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old November 23rd, 2014, 11:22 AM   #289
NordikNerd
Rail & Road traveller
 
NordikNerd's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2011
Location: Linköping
Posts: 2,747
Likes (Received): 1408

Quote:
Originally Posted by RV View Post
Seems like Green ideology has not came to Iceland, at least yet. I like it Car is the sign of progress and personal freedom. They must remove those traffic lights they have.

I consider the high percentage of cars as a mean of transport in Iceland depends on the following reasons:

1) Low population density results in lots of cheap land per acre. This is causing the urban sprawl.

2) Cheap land and sprawl makes it possible to build extensive parking-spaces, which enhances the convenience for people commuting to work by car.

3) Low population density resulting in difficulties maintaining an effective public transport system.

4) The north atlantic weather deters people to bicycle to work, so instead they drive.

5) Despite the recent crisis, Iceland is still a rich country with low unemployment rate, where people work a lot so they can afford to buy cars and pay for the petrol.

In a country with high population density, land is expensive. Available parking is difficult to find. Motorists will spend a lot of time in traffic jams and looking for a place to park their car.

Meaning the people in such a country will have a more positive opinion about public transport than the icelandic people.

Considering the difference in available parking space I have noticed that the average parking spot size in Germany is clearly narrower than the one in Sweden, possibly because land is more expensive in a more densely populated country.



Icelandic Speed Camera.
NordikNerd no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old November 24th, 2014, 10:59 AM   #290
RV
Registered User
 
Join Date: Oct 2007
Location: Porvoo
Posts: 726
Likes (Received): 275

Quote:
Originally Posted by bigic View Post
You really want to see pedestrians trying to cross the street while people in car lanes are driving like on highway? Or cars crashing as the result of a busy unsignalled intersection?
Or you suggest a gigantic feat of rebuilding all main city streets into highways, with grade-separated pedestrian crossings and intersection?
Послато са ZTE Blade Q Mini уз помоћ Тапатока
The latter one Miklabraut should be entirely an expressway, in city streets pedestrian bridges are sufficient and you don't seem to like highways very much so what are you doing here anyways? Car is the symbol of prosperity and personal liberty.
RV no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old November 26th, 2014, 11:50 AM   #291
NordikNerd
Rail & Road traveller
 
NordikNerd's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2011
Location: Linköping
Posts: 2,747
Likes (Received): 1408

New Survey about traffic in Reykjavik



It's hard to imagine that the number of travellers in private cars during the summer is the lowest in many years, especially when you are stuck in a Reykjavik traffic jam.

Still 75 percent of the population is traveling by car in Reykjavik during the summer.


The number people who went on foot, by bicycle or by bus in Reykjavik this summer has increased compared to the previous year. According to the new survey by the Road Ministry, the use of private cars has decreased.

In 2007, 87 percent usually traveled by private car in the icelandic capital, but this number declined steadily until 2012. This summer, 75 percent usually traveled by private car, in the period from June to August.

This decline in this period is perhaps understandable due to the price increase of gasoline. In July 2008 the gas price was 177 ISK/L but is now its 227 ISK/L.

While everything else also has become more expensive it is obvious that many people choose to use a car rather sparingly.

The bus fees has increased substantially in recent years, despite that it is still much cheaper to buy bus cards than owning a car and pay for the gasoline.

This summer the travel by bus went up to 7.6 percent, it was 4 percent in 2010 and 5 percent in 2008.

Pedestrians were almost 6 %, or the same number as in 2010. Three percent said they usually go on foot in 2008. Respondents to the survey were in or near the city center for both walking and cycling more than other respondents in the capital.
NordikNerd no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old November 26th, 2014, 12:01 PM   #292
Bjarki
Registered User
 
Join Date: Sep 2009
Location: Iceland
Posts: 373
Likes (Received): 159

Quote:
Originally Posted by NordikNerd View Post
I consider the high percentage of cars as a mean of transport in Iceland depends on the following reasons:

1) Low population density results in lots of cheap land per acre. This is causing the urban sprawl.

2) Cheap land and sprawl makes it possible to build extensive parking-spaces, which enhances the convenience for people commuting to work by car.

3) Low population density resulting in difficulties maintaining an effective public transport system.

4) The north atlantic weather deters people to bicycle to work, so instead they drive.

5) Despite the recent crisis, Iceland is still a rich country with low unemployment rate, where people work a lot so they can afford to buy cars and pay for the petrol.

In a country with high population density, land is expensive. Available parking is difficult to find. Motorists will spend a lot of time in traffic jams and looking for a place to park their car.

Meaning the people in such a country will have a more positive opinion about public transport than the icelandic people.

Considering the difference in available parking space I have noticed that the average parking spot size in Germany is clearly narrower than the one in Sweden, possibly because land is more expensive in a more densely populated country.



Icelandic Speed Camera.
I think you are spot on with the analysis of Iceland's high car ownership. Land has been plentiful and cheap which has so far encouraged car-dependant sprawl in the Reykjavík area.

I think there comes a point in the development of a city like that where outward focused sprawl becomes more diffcult. Even if Iceland as a country has plenty of land, the Reykjavík metro area has more limited options for expansion and outward expansion has the effect of increasing the traffic load on more central arterial streets that can't really be widened or made into expressways without demolishing older parts of the city. The attitudes of the politicians and officials have taken a complete U-turn from the car-centered sprawly mindset of the last decades that seems to have climaxed in 2007. Most are more inward focused now, emphasising infill development and redevelopment of brownfield land. There was a new survey published a few days ago of the transportation habits of the residents of the Reykjavík area. According to that, the modal share of the private automobile has dropped from its peak of 87% in 2007 to 75% in 2014.
Bjarki no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old November 26th, 2014, 12:20 PM   #293
ChrisZwolle
Road user
 
ChrisZwolle's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2006
Location: Zwolle
Posts: 43,603
Likes (Received): 19391

As a percentage in number of trips or distance traveled?
ChrisZwolle no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old November 26th, 2014, 12:42 PM   #294
Bjarki
Registered User
 
Join Date: Sep 2009
Location: Iceland
Posts: 373
Likes (Received): 159

Quote:
Originally Posted by ChrisZwolle View Post
As a percentage in number of trips or distance traveled?
Neither I think. It's how people respond to the question "What is your primary method of transport within the Capital Area?"

The 2014 survey also asks if people used travel modes other than the car more in the summer of 2014 than they did in 2012. 32% of respondants say that they did. Most of those (62%) said that they had travelled more by bicycle than two years before.
Bjarki no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old November 26th, 2014, 01:15 PM   #295
NordikNerd
Rail & Road traveller
 
NordikNerd's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2011
Location: Linköping
Posts: 2,747
Likes (Received): 1408

Quote:
Originally Posted by Bjarki View Post
Even if Iceland as a country has plenty of land, the Reykjavík metro area has more limited options for expansion and outward expansion has the effect of increasing the traffic load on more central arterial streets that can't really be widened or made into expressways without demolishing older parts of the city.

Yes. Central Reykjavik is situated on a peninsula, so there is a limited amount of land to expand the inner city on.

This leads to the massive congestions, eventhough Reykjavik is a quite small city compared to other capitals.




Very big queues for a city of 120.000, my city Linköping is almost the same size as Reykjavik, but no such congestion never happends, not even at rush hour.
Still Linköping has a lot of urban sprawl.

Reykjavik City pop: 120 165 Linköping City pop:104 232
Reykjavik Metro : 201 847 Linköping Metro pop: 151 493




I think one of the issues with congestions in Reykjavik is the location of the city. It is a coastal city situated on a peninsula in a not very well accesable corner of the country.
Linköping on the other hand has a lot of land to expand on, the flow of traffic can exit the innercity in any direction.



Likewise I presume that the location of the norweigan city Bergen, also causes these problems.
NordikNerd no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old November 26th, 2014, 01:49 PM   #296
RV
Registered User
 
Join Date: Oct 2007
Location: Porvoo
Posts: 726
Likes (Received): 275

It seems to have the same problems as Helsinki (very difficult peninsular location). Sadly just before the construction should have been began on a new 5+5-laned road from Pasila to the city center (it would go nearby the main railway with not a single building being torn down) and it tunnelized by-pass (Central Tunnel) in the late 1960's, the stupid united Communist and Green wave took over... Reykjavik may need a coastal by-pass and a connector tunnel from that busy road to it.
RV no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old November 26th, 2014, 11:50 PM   #297
NordikNerd
Rail & Road traveller
 
NordikNerd's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2011
Location: Linköping
Posts: 2,747
Likes (Received): 1408

Quote:
Originally Posted by RV View Post
.. Reykjavik may need a coastal by-pass and a connector tunnel from that busy road to it.



My suggestion is the construction of a new parallell road through Grafarvogur connecting the Iceland ring road no 1 and the Saebraut road with a new bridge across the bay.
__________________
Trains at Norrköping Railway station 2018-01-07

RV liked this post
NordikNerd no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old November 27th, 2014, 12:27 PM   #298
RV
Registered User
 
Join Date: Oct 2007
Location: Porvoo
Posts: 726
Likes (Received): 275

Quote:
Originally Posted by NordikNerd View Post

My suggestion is the construction of a new parallell road through Grafarvogur connecting the Iceland ring road no 1 and the Saebraut road with a new bridge across the bay.
+ Removing traffic lights and replacing them with proper interchanges = a vot.

AKA this:

Blue: currently existing expressways not marked as such on the map
Red: expressway to be built
Green: expressway side/streets on central area/new street


Last edited by RV; November 27th, 2014 at 12:49 PM.
RV no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old November 27th, 2014, 03:31 PM   #299
Bjarki
Registered User
 
Join Date: Sep 2009
Location: Iceland
Posts: 373
Likes (Received): 159

Quote:
Originally Posted by RV View Post
+ Removing traffic lights and replacing them with proper interchanges = a vot.

AKA this:

Blue: currently existing expressways not marked as such on the map
Red: expressway to be built
Green: expressway side/streets on central area/new street

This is pretty much the plan they had in the 1960s. There will never be an expressway along the north coast but the bridge across the bay on your drawings is pretty much the exact alignment of Sundabraut as originally planned in the 1980s. Those plans have since developed into a road that sways further north on the east side of the bay rather than going through the neighborhood of Grafarvogur and the plan is that Sundabraut would become the main route out of the city to the north.

Here is the plan for Sundabraut as it looked in 2007 with extensive tunneling:


Here is the layout of the whole road out of the city:


Here is a more recent (and cheaper) idea:
Bjarki no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old November 27th, 2014, 07:27 PM   #300
RV
Registered User
 
Join Date: Oct 2007
Location: Porvoo
Posts: 726
Likes (Received): 275

Hate cheaper solutions They are usually stupid and in need to be rebuilt in a few years, like Swedish 2+1 and Finnish 1+1 or ring roads with traffic lights. That means it is in fact a more expensive solution.

Why the heck wouldn't they want it to be the city's main road? More space for ppl above the ground and stuff! If they want sufficient and cheap though, they just will need to build it above the ground in the harbor area, which would be only logical.
RV no está en línea   Reply With Quote


Reply

Thread Tools

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Related topics on SkyscraperCity


All times are GMT +2. The time now is 07:53 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.11 Beta 4
Copyright ©2000 - 2018, vBulletin Solutions Inc.
Feedback Buttons provided by Advanced Post Thanks / Like (Pro) - vBulletin Mods & Addons Copyright © 2018 DragonByte Technologies Ltd.

vBulletin Optimisation provided by vB Optimise (Pro) - vBulletin Mods & Addons Copyright © 2018 DragonByte Technologies Ltd.

SkyscraperCity ☆ In Urbanity We trust ☆ about us | privacy policy | DMCA policy

tech management by Sysprosium