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Old January 7th, 2009, 05:50 PM   #101
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Most-polluted Kolkata kills 2.5 times more than Delhi; Vadodara safest

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Kolkata is the most polluted metropolitan city in the country and is around 2.5 times more dangerous than the capital city of Delhi.

Mumbai is the second most polluted metro and Chennai a much safer fourth. Delhi ranks third while among all areas of the country, Vadodara is the safest city to live in.

According to statistics released by the Scientific and Environmental Researach Institute, quoting government figures, Kolkata had a suspended paritculate matter (SPM), the measure of pollution, at a steep 511 compared to Delhi's 234 and Mumbai's 322.

Chennai was 176 and Vadodara came up trumps with 122. All the figures were computed with 100 as the base while the figures for Bangalore were yet to be computed.

....

As far as Vadodara was concerned, he said it was obvious that pollution norms were followed there much more strictly. "Also you have to bear in mind that almost all auto travelling on Kolkata roads use kata tel or adulterated fuel which is a mixture of benzene, kerosene and petrol. It's cheap but is the killer.

....
Source: INDIA TODAY on 7th Jan 2009
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Old January 7th, 2009, 05:54 PM   #102
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Vintage Kolkata trams glam up to make a comeback

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KOLKATA, India (Reuters Life!) - They've been rumbling down Kolkata's roads for more than a 130 years, and now vintage trams are undergoing a makeover in their only home in India to entice commuters and reduce choking pollution.

For decades, the trams have fought a bitter turf war with cars and buses in Kolkata, a former British colonial capital and a city of over 15 million people considered an urban nightmare due to its belching public transport and congested roads.

The slow-paced but environment-friendly trams, which often fill the air with electric sparks as they trundle down their tracks, have been plying Kolkata since 1873, but over the years they have been abandoned in favor of faster transport, and their tracks have been pulled out to make way for more vehicles.

But now, the vintage contraptions are back in after a multi-million, government-funded makeover which began a few years ago. So far, 12 trams have been renovated at a total cost of over 14 million rupees ($290,000), with 12 more slated for renewal.

....
Source: REUTERS INDIA on 6th Jan 2009
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Old January 13th, 2009, 08:58 PM   #103
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No 'Footprint', No Life - By Keith Lockitch

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As environmentalism continues to grow in prominence, more and more of us are trying to live a "greener" lifestyle. But the more "eco-friendly" you try to become, likely the more you find yourself confused and frustrated by the green message.

Have you tried giving up your bright and cheery incandescent light bulbs to save energy--only to learn that their gloomy-but-efficient compact fluorescent replacements contain mercury? Perhaps you’ve tried to free up space in landfills by foregoing the ease and convenience of disposable diapers--only to be criticized for the huge quantities of energy and water consumed in laundering those nasty cloth diapers. Even voicing support for renewable energy no longer seems to be green enough, as angry environmentalists protest the development of "pristine lands" for wind farms and solar power plants.

Why is it that no matter what sacrifices you make to try to reduce your "environmental footprint," it never seems to be enough?

Well, consider why it is that you have an "environmental footprint" in the first place.

Everything we do to sustain our lives has an impact on nature. Every value we create to advance our well-being--every ounce of food we grow, every structure we build, every iPhone we manufacture--is produced by extracting raw materials and reshaping them to serve our needs. Every good thing in our lives comes from altering nature for our own benefit.

From the perspective of human life and happiness, a big "environmental footprint" is an enormous positive. This is why people in India and China are striving to increase theirs: to build better roads, more cars and computers, new factories and power plants and hospitals.

But for environmentalism, the size of your "footprint" is the measure of your guilt. Nature, according to green philosophy, is something to be left alone--to be preserved untouched by human activity. Their notion of an "environmental footprint" is intended as a measure of how much you "disturb" nature, with disturbing nature viewed as a sin requiring atonement. Just as the Christian concept of original sin conveys the message that human beings are stained with evil simply for having been born, the green concept of an "environmental footprint" implies that you should feel guilty for your very existence.

It should hardly be any surprise, then, that nothing you do to try to lighten your "footprint" will ever be deemed satisfactory. So long as you are still pursuing life-sustaining activities, whatever you do to reduce your impact on nature in one respect (e.g., cloth diapers) will simply lead to other impacts in other respects (e.g., water use)--like some perverse game of green whack-a-mole--and will be attacked and condemned by greens outraged at whatever "footprint" remains. So long as you still have some "footprint," further penance is required; so long as you are still alive, no degree of sacrifice can erase your guilt.

The only way to leave no "footprint" would be to die--a conclusion that is not lost on many green ideologues. Consider the premise of the nonfiction bestseller titled "The World Without Us," which fantasizes about how the earth would "recover" if all humanity suddenly became extinct. Or consider the chilling, anti-human conclusion of an op-ed discussing cloth versus disposable diapers: "From the earth’s point of view, it’s not all that important which kind of diapers you use. The important decision was having the baby."

The next time you trustingly adopt a "green solution" like fluorescent lights, cloth diapers or wind farms, only to be puzzled when met with still further condemnation and calls for even more sacrifices, remember what counts as a final solution for these ideologues.

The only rational response to such a philosophy is to challenge it at its core. We must acknowledge that it is the essence of human survival to reshape nature for our own benefit, and that far from being a sin, it is our highest virtue. Don’t be fooled by the cries that industrial civilization is "unsustainable." This cry dates to at least the 19th century, but is belied by the facts. Since the Industrial Revolution, population and life expectancy, to say nothing of the enjoyment of life, have steadily grown.

It is time to recognize environmentalism as a philosophy of guilt and sacrifice--and to reject it in favor of a philosophy that proudly upholds the value of human life.

Keith Lockitch, PhD in physics, is a fellow at the Ayn Rand Center for Individual Rights, focusing on science and environmentalism. The Ayn Rand Center is a division of the Ayn Rand Institute and promotes the philosophy of Ayn Rand, author of Atlas Shrugged and The Fountainhead. This was first published in the Washington Times
My Source: Hawaii Reporter 12th Jan 2009

It is sad that what is identified as environmental friendly may turn out to be a environmental hazard. For the hazards identified by the author corrective measures to be incorporated in green guidelines provided by various world bodies. We are still in the learning process, to arrive at the best and the optimal environmental solution may take its own time. But, having some guidelines for sustainable development is better than going after chaotic development.

I have quoted the article here as it is universal.
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Old January 14th, 2009, 09:09 AM   #104
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Adopt water harvesting as national mission: Soz

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NEW DELHI: Union Minister for Water Resources Saifuddin Soz has urged people to use water judiciously and adopt water harvesting as a national mission.

Inaugurating an international conference on “Water, Environment, Energy and Society (WEES-2009),” organised by the National Institute of Hydrology at Roorkee, Professor Soz highlighted the reduction in per capita availability of water owing to population growth.

Referring to the depleting groundwater table and deteriorating water quality, he said appropriate strategies should be planned to meet the situation.

An efficient management system should be in place for optimum utilisation of water resources. The impact of climate change on water resources was being studied by the Ministry.

In some areas, over-exploitation of water sources affected the water table and quality. At the same time, there were situations resulting from unplanned development or improper planning.

“Serious efforts” were on to address numerous challenges in the sector with due emphasis on sustainability of eco-system.

“Sustainable development and efficient management of water resources are the key to economic growth and poverty alleviation, more so for India, where about 70 per cent of the population is dependent on agriculture,” he added.

....
Source: The Hindu on 14th Jan 2009
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Old January 15th, 2009, 06:30 PM   #105
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IISc takes a step in climatology

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BANGALORE : Faced with an acute shortage of climatologists in major research centres, IISc's postgraduate specialisation in climate
sciences, the first in Bangalore, comes as a shot in the arm for students.

The new specialisation has received responses from 100 engineering students in its first year for the master's degree in climate sciences.

....

The course comes as part of new initiatives launched by the Ministry of Earth Sciences to understand atmospheric, oceanic and earth sciences in the context of debates on climate change. The ministry itself is facing shortage of trained personnel in the area and has urgently called on research institutions to create conditions for more students.
Source: The Times of India o 15 Jan 2009
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Old January 15th, 2009, 06:48 PM   #106
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India may see the Tata - MDI Air Car this year

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Forget hybrid vehicles, forget electric cars. How can any of them match up to a car that runs on next to nothing? Ladies and gentleman, presenting the Air Car, made by French company MDI in collaboration with India's Tata Motors. Running on compressed air, the revolutionary vehicle may be introduced in India before the end of this year.

....



Though the price of the car will be officially announced at the launch, the price is expected range from Rs2.33 lakh to Rs8.69 lakh depending on the model.
Source: domain-b.com on 13th Jan 2009

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Old January 17th, 2009, 09:17 AM   #107
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Modi in Favor of Improved Public Transportation

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Deputy Chief Minister Sushil Kumar Modi, at a function at the Bhartiya Nritya Kala Mandir Open Theater in Patna on Thursday, inaugurated the 'Conserve Oil and Gas Fortnight' by advocating more public transportation in the state capital to save energy and cut down on pollution emitted by petroleum products.

"The government is working on developing an energy policy that would encourage use of bio-fuel and solar energy. Bihar is the ideal place to become the nation's first 'ethanol hub' because of its strong base in corn and sugarcane production," Modi said.

The Bhartiya Janata Party (BJP) leader informed that Hindustan Petroleum and Reliance Corporation were going to produce ethanol in Sugauli and Motipur sugar factories and starting later this year, the state government would start using 10% ethanol in the gasoline used for transportation purpose.

"In Brazil, the vehicles are already using 35% ethanol and there is no reason why we could not do the same," Modi said while emphasizing the need for ultra-modern public transportation system to cut down on pollution.

Indian Oil Corporation (IOC) General Manager Abhay Jha who presided over the event said that if we did not check the consumption of petrol now, by 2020 over 92% of the oil in India will have to be imported.

A bicycle rally was also flagged off to promote use of bikes for short trips.
Source: PatnaDaily on 15th Jan 2009

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Old January 18th, 2009, 06:57 AM   #108
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Let's light up the lives of India's poor millions

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....

The Energy and Resources Institute (TERI) has launched a programme called Lighting a Billion Lives, which addresses the sad situation of 1.6 billion people globally who have no access to electricity. Unfortunately, 25% of these — 400 million — live in India. Yet, this problem can be addressed and solved within a year, if required, through provision of solar lanterns which in the aggregate would cost less than the subsidy provided on kerosene. It is well known, based on studies by respectable organisations, that over 40% of this subsidy goes to benefit those who are in the business of adulteration of other petroleum products. Yet, a rational shift of this nature is obstructed largely by political considerations.

....
Source: The Times of India 11th Jan 2009
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Old January 23rd, 2009, 12:49 PM   #109
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Safety is critical in nuclear power stations

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New Delhi (PTI): As India makes forays into nuclear power, the issue of safety will become critical for averting a mishap, head of a leading government-owned firm said on Thursday.

....

"Formulation of rules and regulations usually come after an accident," Kumar said stressing the need to incorporate safety measures while formulating projects.

As responsible corporate citizens, PSEs should adopt innovative technologies and management practices for environment safety, he added.

The corporates that do well on environment, safety and health-related fronts, also rank high in business results and are among leading players, said Standing Conference of Public Enterprises (SCOPE), Director Programmes, UK Dikshit.

....
Source: The Hindu on 22nd Jan 2009
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Old January 23rd, 2009, 03:15 PM   #110
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Burning wood, animal dung behind brown haze above Indian Ocean

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London, Jan 23 (ANI): In India, many people burn wood and animal dung to heat their homes and cook their food. Now, a new study has revealed that burning such biomass, organic matter makes up most of a huge brown cloud of pollution that hangs over South Asia and the Indian Ocean during the winter months.

The study found that two thirds of the soot particles in brown haze originate from biomass burning, and only one third from fossil fuel sources.

....

Source: Newspost Online


Quote:



....

A report released in the Jan. 23 issue of Science breathes fresh air into that ongoing study, confirming that the mass, nicknamed the 'Brown Cloud' but comprised of several small, local clouds, is soot from human burning of wood, dung and crop residue, as well as industrial processes and traffic pollution.

....

Source: TIME

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Old January 25th, 2009, 03:14 PM   #111
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Green energy plan for tea industry

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KOLKATA: Renewable energy is all set to be used in the tea industry to reduce manufacturing costs and maintain ecological balance in the Darjeeling Hills, Dooars and Assam. The Tea Board of India and West Bengal Green Energy Development Corporation (WBGEDC) have jointly decided to prepare a package, to be submitted to the Centre.

WBGEDC managing director S P Gonchoudhuri said they held a meeting with tea board officials and several tea associations to discuss adoption of green energy in tea gardens. "We and the tea board will prepare a plan, which will be submitted to the Centre. The package will seek to reduce existing levels of energy consumption to maintain the eco-system of the Hills," he said.

....
Source: The Times of India
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Old January 25th, 2009, 03:18 PM   #112
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Diesel technology best for Indian auto sector: Expert

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PUNE: Better fuel efficiency and lesser chances of pollution has led to a rising acceptance of diesel technology in the automotive sector, said
Pawan Goenka, president of Automotive Research Association of India (ARAI) and a top functionary in the Mahindra & Mahindra Group, on Friday.

Speaking to mediapersons on the sidelines of the 11th Symposium on International Automobile Technology here, Goenka said it has now been proved that vehicles based on diesel technology, though apparently more expensive initially, prove cheaper in the long run.

....
Source: The Times of India
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Old January 25th, 2009, 03:27 PM   #113
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Save Aravallis, plead environmentalists

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New Delhi (IANS): North India will become a big desert if the Aravalli range - one of the oldest mountain ranges in the world - is not protected, say environmentalists, hailing a recent recommendation by a Supreme Court committee in this regard and hoping that court orders would be implemented this time.

The Supreme Court-appointed Central Empowered Committee recommended last week that barring specific locations, mining be banned altogether in the hill range that stretches from Gujarat to Delhi.

It also recommended that illegal buildings in protected areas of the range, just south of the national capital, be demolished. Many earlier bans on illegal mining and construction in the Aravalli hills have been flouted.

....
Source: The Hindu
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Old January 25th, 2009, 03:52 PM   #114
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Killing (with) plastic

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The ban on the use of plastic bags in Delhi, coming in a year which has been declared by the United Nations as the International Year of Natural Fibre, is a welcome move. The Delhi government has taken some path-breaking environment-friendly measures in the past, the most significant of which (done under court orders) was to put the entire public transport fleet on a pollution-free fuel, compressed natural gas (CNG). As should have been expected, shopkeepers are crying foul in the same way that transport operators did when buses had to be converted. Traders argue (falsely) that the step has been taken without offering any viable alternative, but even they are not contesting the raison d’ętre for such a move. The disposal hazards posed by these non-degradable bags and the civic problem they cause by choking drains (Mumbai’s nightmarish deluge of 2005 was the result of this) and rivers (Delhi’s Yamuna is a case in point) are well known. As for substitutes for recycled plastic, these are not lacking, though more will emerge with time. Bags made of cloth, jute, cane, paper and other materials have been in use in the past and can come in handy once again. Besides, plastic can be made degradable by adding suitable additives to the polymer. These alternatives will cost more but they are environmentally harmless, reusable and last longer (which offsets the initial cost disadvantage).

The problem is not with the ban but with the penalty for ignoring it. What is prescribed is a fine of Rs 1 lakh and/or imprisonment of five years. The fine happens to be vastly more than what is prescribed under various laws for far more serious offences, and the jail term is simply an outrageous idea. India criminalises far too many things (including libel, which in most civilised countries is only a civil offence). The argument that it will act as a deterrent does not wash, because all violations of the law should then lead to exemplary jail terms so that no one ever breaks any law. The simple rule is that the punishment should fit the crime, and using a plastic bag should not lead to five years in jail. The fact also is that stringent penalties simply raise the harassment quotient as officials charged with enforcing the law extract what they can by the arbitrary exercise of power. Since officials of a variety of agencies (the departments of environment and health, civic bodies, pollution control boards, etc) have been empowered to enforce the ban, the fillip this gives to corruption can be easily imagined.

The plastic bag problem is not confined to Delhi; coloured and white bags can be seen in most parts of the country, pollutting roadsides, beaches, rooftops, mountainsides, rivers and streams. And as it happens, Delhi is not the first state to prohibit the use of plastic bags. Others have done it before, with very mixed results. Goa was the first in 1998, followed by Himachal Pradesh which proscribed the use of coloured polythene bags in 1999 and extended the bar in 2004 to include all carry bags of less than 70 microns thickness. The latter has been more successful at enforcement than the former and has now become more ambitious: It plans to make Himachal Pradesh a carbon-free state in order to protect its fragile hill ecology. Mumbai banned plastic bags in the aftermath of its flood three years ago. What this makes clear is that merely notifying such a ban does not do the trick, there has to be effective enforcement. In fact, it is worth asking why the matter should be left to individual states? A national law is required, with steps taken to promote the use of environment-friendly alternatives.
Source: Business Standard
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Old January 25th, 2009, 03:57 PM   #115
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Environment ministry admits bacteria is major river pollutant

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MAJOR rivers in India have high bacterial contamination, the Union Ministry of Environment and Forests (moef) said in a press release dated December 24, 2008. Yamuna and Ganga top the list of most polluted rivers (see graph below).

Bacterial contamination in water is indicated by the presence of coliform bacteria that find their way into rivers mostly through untreated sewage and cause waterborne diseases.

The moef admission on bacterial contamination in rivers seems to indicate a major shift in the way water quality is assessed.

....



How clean?

The cpcb data on which the ministry has based its press release also said rivers in India are getting cleaner. According to the data, 46 per cent of the sampling locations had water that conformed to total coliform standards in 1995. This figure went up to 50 per cent in 2007. “The water quality monitoring results with respect to indicator of pathogenic bacteria show there is gradual improvement in quality,” the report observed.

These numbers too mask the reality. A close look at the data showed major rivers have recorded coliform levels many times higher than the permissible limit. The number of water monitoring stations that have recorded high coliform levels, have also gone up from 259 in 1995 to 623 in 2007.

It is also not known how much of India’s river length is polluted if we consider both parameters— bod and coliform. In such a situation it is critical to reassess the pollution profile of rivers. Deterioration of river water quality is a reality as cities let out untreated sewage into rivers. By cpcb’s own estimate, only 6,000 million litres per day (mld) of the 33,000 mld sewage generated each day is treated. Here too most sewage treatment plants (stps) do not meet any standards. Even moef standard for treated effluent from stps (1,000 mpn-10,000 mpn) is lax.

The environment ministry has promised a rethink by initiating a fresh exercise for ‘river conservation strategy’ to promote a holistic and integrated approach.’
Source: Kshitij Gupta, Down To Earth
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Old January 25th, 2009, 04:14 PM   #116
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Indian experiment may deter global warming

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Bangalore: The global warming prodigy that shackles the very existence of the world may soon find its answers in the oceans, if an Indian experiment on carbon dioxide (CO2) succeeds. The team of 29 Indian scientists along with 11 German and 10 other scientists will divulge in a two months expedition to prove that CO2, which is responsible for global warming can be stored under the ocean for ages.

As per the hypothesis, there exist a potential to clean up as much as one billion tonne (1 GT) of CO2 from the atmosphere every year and store it below the ocean for centuries. So, the experiment's success would be a relief to the world, which emits 7 GT of carbon every year. During the $2 million experiment, scientists will throw 20 tonnes of dissolved iron sulphate in 300 sq km of ocean. This iron is expected to stimulate a rapid blooming of phytoplankton, a microscopic algae that grows on the ocean surface. The algae, like other plants will take up CO2 from air and convert it to carbon compounds like carbohydrates. As the plant dies, it will sink along with the carbon. So, if the technique works efficiently and the plants sink well below the ocean surface, the carbon would be put away for a long period, reports Times of India.

....
Source: SiliconIndia
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Old January 26th, 2009, 10:32 AM   #117
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^ That experiment was suspended because of protests by environmentalists and hence German goverment backing out
http://timesofindia.indiatimes.com/E...ow/3988171.cms
Quote:
NEW DELHI: In a major setback to the Indo-German Antarctic expedition, LOHAFEX, the German science ministry has bowed to pressure from
environmental NGOs and suspended permission to the mission's proposed ocean fertilization experiment till its impact is independently reviewed.

The expedition's of 48 international scientists, including 29 from India, is currently cruising in the South Atlantic Ocean and is just days away from the proposed experiment site in Scotia Sea near the Antarctic peninsula.
There, the scientists aimed to conduct ocean iron fertilization (OIF) experiments involving the dumping of 20 tonnes of iron sulphate to study whether the resulting proliferation of tiny plant life on the ocean surface actually leads to carbon dioxide (CO2) being sucking from the atmosphere and stored below the ocean. CO2 is a major greenhouse gas and OIF is being touted by some experts as a way to fight climate change.

"The order means that we cannot carry out actual fertilization until the review is over and the German science ministry gives the clearance. We do not know how long the review process will take,'' Prof S W A Naqvi, co-chief scientist of project, told TOI on email aboard the research ship Polerstern.

The scientists, however, plan to go ahead with their scheduled preparations for the experiment. "If the clearance comes within 8-10 days, it will not affect our programme because we anyway have to spend some time selecting a suitable ‘eddy' for our experiment, map it thoroughly and determine its characteristics,'' Naqvi said.

Nature online reported on Wednesday that the German science ministry has asked Germany's Alfred Wegener Institute for Polar and Marine Research (AWI), the research body behind the expedition (along with India's National Institute of Oceanography), to commission an independent assessment of the study's environmental safety.

Environmental NGOs like the Canada-based ETC Group contend that the experiment will flout an agreement signed by 191 countries at the UN Convention on Biological Diversity (CBD) in 2008. They have also raised fears about the pollution resulting from the dumping of iron. LOHAFEX scientists say all "signatures'' of the iron seeding will be quickly erased by the ocean and it will leave no lasting impact on marine ecology. They add that a subsequent international meet permitting scientific research on ocean fertilization had, in effect, made the CBD declaration irrelevant.

Said Naqvi, "Our experiment was being planned since 2005, and the information has been on our website for a long time. We had also circulated our plans among participants of the London Convention/London Protocol meeting in October 2008. It is intriguing that the people who are opposing LOHAFEX started making noise only after we sailed from Cape Town.''

The experts add that if legitimate scientific studies on ocean fertilization aren't allowed, policymakers would never be able to make informed decisions on OIF.
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Old January 27th, 2009, 10:13 PM   #118
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Germany clears Indo-German Antarctic expedition

Germany clears Indo-German Antarctic expedition

Quote:
NEW DELHI: Ending days of suspense and anxiety for the Indo-German team of scientists sailing in the cold and desolate waters off Antarctica, the
German government on Monday gave the go-ahead to a controversial ocean-seeding experiment that experts say could lead to a way of fighting climate change.

"This is the best Republic Day gift we could have hoped for," S W A Naqwi, leader of the 29-member Indian scientific contingent aboard the ship, RV Polarstern, told TOI on email from the vessel. The expedition, called LOHAFEX, is now in the process of dropping 20 tonnes of iron sulphate across a 300-sq-km patch in the South Atlantic Ocean to study the resulting explosion of plant life that's expected suck CO2 gas from the atmosphere and store it below the ocean.

The German government had put the expedition on hold, days after the scientists set sail from Cape Town on January 7, following protests from environmental groups. These groups said the experiment would breach an international moratorium on ocean iron fertilization (OIF) – as the technique is called – and could damage the marine ecology of the region.

"The last few days were full of anxiety. But we were confident that this would pass, and did not allow ourselves to be distracted from the task at hand. As a result, the suspension has not affected our work schedule at all. Right now, of course, everyone is excited and greatly pleased," Prof Naqwi, who teaches at National Institute of Oceanography, said.

The "all-clear" came from the German ministry of education and research after the experiment was reviewed by three independent agencies – the British Antarctic Survey, Institute for Marine Research, Kiel, and the German Environmental Agency. "After a study of expert reports, I am convinced there are no scientific or legal objections against the... ocean research experiment LOHAFEX," German research minister Annette Schavan said in a statement.

The scientists utilized the period of suspension to prepare for the experiment. "We have selected and surveyed a suitable 'eddy', a body of water that does not exchange much with the rest of the ocean. It's located at 49S, 16W. After we got the green signal, we have filled the tanks with iron sulphate solution in seawater and began discharging this solution on Tuesday morning. The operation will take around 30 hours," Naqwi said.

The iron seeding is expected to result in a rapid explosion of phytoplankton, an algae that quickly dies and sinks into the ocean along with the CO2 it absorbs during photosynthesis. "We will make regular observations inside and outside the fertilized patch, monitoring the evolution
and demise of the algal bloom until early March," Naqwi said.

OIF is seen as a promising geo-engineering method to trap billions of tonnes of CO2 below the ocean if conducted on a large scale.

LOHAFEX, the biggest and most comprehensive study of the method, is expected to provide vital answers about its efficacy and the effects it could have on marine ecology. With the method generating a lot of interest from private companies seeking to profit from it in the carbon trade market, a comprehensive scientific study will help policymakers frame appropriate laws on OIF.
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Old January 29th, 2009, 06:58 PM   #119
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India to probe drugs in water supplies discovered by Swedish researchers

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NEW DELHI — The prime minister's office in India said Wednesday it has ordered a probe into the results of a Swedish study that found supposedly treated wastewater in a poor southern state contained a cocktail of 21 different active pharmaceutical ingredients.

The environment ministry was ordered to investigate and determine "the facts of the matter," said a senior official from the prime minister's office who asked not to be named.

....
Source: The Canadian Press

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Last edited by Krishnamoorthy K; January 29th, 2009 at 07:18 PM.
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Old January 30th, 2009, 01:14 PM   #120
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Ciprofloxacin in waste water not being checked: PCB

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HYDERABAD: The AP Pollution Control Board conceded on Thursday that it is not testing for ciprofloxacin, a synthetic antibiotic with a broad
spectrum of antibacterial activity, in the waste water let into rivulets after treatment at the Patancheru Effluent Treatment Plant.

"We are checking on parameters that have been stipulated by IS 10,500 of 1991. Ciprofloxacin is not one of them. But following some reports, we would be examining the treated waste water for ciprofloxacin too,'' Madhusudan Rao, joint chief engineer of PCB, told TOI.

....
Source: The Times of India on 30 Jan 2009
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