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Old April 3rd, 2008, 12:21 AM   #81
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Cool video!
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Old April 8th, 2008, 08:43 AM   #82
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Lollapalooza's 90-artist lineup includes Lupe Fiasco
By Greg Kot
Originally posted: April 7, 2008

Promoters will unveil 90 artists and bands Monday that will perform Aug. 1-3 at Lollapalooza in Grant Park. Besides previously confirmed headliners Radiohead, Rage Against the Machine, Nine Inch Nails, Kanye West and Wilco, Chicago hip-hop artist Lupe Fiasco has been added to the lineup.

The festival includes numerous encore peformances by Lollapalooza acts, including West, Wilco, Fiasco, Gnarls Barkley, the Black Keys and the Raconteurs. Promoters also poached a number of acts who starred at the Pitchfork Music Festival in Union Park in recent years, including Cat Power, Stephen Malkmus, Girl Talk, CSS, Battles, Jamie Lidell, Spank Rock, the Go! Team, Kid Sister, and the Cool Kids.

http://leisureblogs.chicagotribune.c...aloozas-9.html

Who's going?
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Old May 1st, 2008, 05:18 AM   #83
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A little bit old but it's still news...

Robert Falls sets goals for a global Goodman Theatre

By Chris Jones | Tribune critic
April 20, 2008

After 20 years at the artistic helm of Chicago's pre-eminent theater company, Robert Falls was feted, saluted and otherwise glorified so many times that even the honoree became sick of it all.
--------
Falls' new interest in world theater—a topic that did not occupy all that much of his first 20 years—is likely to have a huge impact on the Chicago arts scene. Unlike, say, the Steppenwolf Theatre, which draws much of its direction from projects suggested by a diverse ensemble of artists, the Goodman marches far more explicitly to Falls' curatorial beat. And it gets behind it. On Monday, executive director Roche Schulfer said the theater was committed to raising $500,000 to support the international component of the O'Neill Festival in early 2009. And board chair Shawn Donnelley outlined the theater's new campaign to build for itself a multimillion-dollar endowment.
--------
But as Falls laid things out Monday, that's just the start. He talked about how the now-defunct Chicago International Theatre Festival inspired a generation of Chicago artists and how he wants to continue its legacy. And he said he is determined to reintroduce international touring to the Goodman. That will be very expensive.

http://www.chicagotribune.com/entert...,1133912.story
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Old May 12th, 2008, 11:30 PM   #84
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I have been catching up on all the news from last week when I was on vacation. I did not know that Muti had accepted the directorship of the Chicago Symphony.

http://www.nytimes.com/2008/05/06/ar...UMa6v2tmQvHgNA

----------------------------

And the Brass Ring Goes to Chicago Symphony: Riccardo Muti Says Yes
By DANIEL J. WAKIN
Published: May 6, 2008
Correction Appended

The Chicago Symphony Orchestra snagged the prize.


Hiroyuki Ito for The New York Times
Riccardo Muti conducting the New York Philharmonic at Avery Fisher Hall on Jan. 17, 2008.


In a classical music world of diminishing grandeur, the orchestra has hired one of the last lions of podium glamour, Riccardo Muti, as its music director and in so doing is lending a sheen to the city’s cultural profile.

At the same time Mr. Muti’s embrace of a cold city on Lake Michigan — which he diplomatically likens to the Mediterranean waters off his native Italy — dampened spirits at the New York Philharmonic, which failed to lure him at least once and, by some accounts, including his own, possibly twice.

His decision to assume the helm in Chicago is a remarkable turnaround. As recently as September, Mr. Muti dismissed the idea of taking over the responsibilities of an American music directorship, and all the nonmusical duties the job entails. But on Monday, in his first interview since signing the contract, he said he was fully committed to the position, including supervising auditions, helping raise money and engaging in community outreach.

“From my years in Philadelphia I know exactly what I’m expected to do as music director of an American orchestra,” said Mr. Muti, 66, who was music director of the Philadelphia Orchestra from 1980 to 1992. The job, he said, was not just to make good music in the concert hall “but to serve the community.” He cited his work performing in trouble spots around the world, including the Balkans, Lebanon and Armenia, and giving concerts in places like a prison in Italy.

Mr. Muti called the Chicago Symphony “a perfect machine,” with the versatility to play huge works like Prokofiev’s Symphony No. 3 and Scriabin’s “Poem of Ecstasy” or to display the refined delicacy needed for small-scale Schubert.

He remained steadfastly unattached after resigning as music director of the Teatro Alla Scala in Milan in 2005 in an operatic kerfuffle. Orchestra musicians and other workers at the theater had turned against him in an internal political wrangle.

“I thought it was time for me to be absolutely free, like the birds in the air,” he said. “Birds go around and they enjoy their happiness, their freedom. But sometimes it can happen they find a tree, and they like to stop on a tree, and they didn’t know about the tree before. It doesn’t mean one tree is better than another tree. It just happens at the right moment in life.”

The Chicago Symphony has been without a music director since 2006, when Daniel Barenboim ended a 15-year run. In Mr. Muti it has a charismatic Italian who can draw the best from musicians, a dashing figure with flowing raven locks who also imposes a rigorous approach to the score.

The Chicago players learned about the appointment on Monday morning, when they were called to a conference room at Symphony Center and told the news. Mr. Muti will take over in the 2010-11 season. His contract will run for five years, and he is expected to conduct a minimum of 10 weeks a season and lead tours.

“The applause was giant,” said Eugene Izotov, the principal oboist, who had played under Mr. Muti during a guest appearances last fall. “We really connected in so many ways, musically, artistically, personally. His presence will add so much not just to us but to the city of Chicago. We need excitement in this business and substance, and he has both.”

Members of the storied orchestra clearly felt they had found a leader to match its stature.

“There are a few people on this planet who are really just giants of the conducting world, and he’s one of them,” said Rob Kassinger, a double bassist. “It’s just such a privilege to be able to look forward and say, ‘I’m going to get to work with this guy.’ ”

Mr. Muti turned down the music director’s job at the New York Philharmonic in 2000. Last year he agreed to take on a position equivalent to principal guest conductor, in which he was expected to spend six to eight weeks a season with the orchestra and lead it on tours, beginning in 2009 (although he now says that he did not agree to a specific number of weeks).

Speaking from his villa in Anif, Austria, near Salzburg, Mr. Muti said he would continue his association with the New York Philharmonic but suggested that his new schedule would reduce his time there. Zarin Mehta, the Philharmonic’s president, said Mr. Muti would not be back as a guest conductor once he took over the Chicago job. That, he said, made the Chicago announcement a “disappointment.” The Philharmonic musicians are known to be especially fond of playing for him.

Given the regular visits by major American orchestras to Carnegie Hall, the Philharmonic does not invite other music directors as guests, Mr. Mehta said, because “it confuses the image of an orchestra and music director.” While he said he was thrilled for the Chicago orchestra and for Mr. Muti, he added that the Philharmonic had decided a while ago to move in a “different direction, to go to a younger person who is going to spend more time with us.”

In July the Philharmonic appointed the American Alan Gilbert, 41, as its music director, to start in 2009. The Los Angeles Philharmonic similarly cast its lot with a young, non-European conductor, announcing that Gustavo Dudamel, 26, of Venezuela would be its next music director.

The Chicago Symphony began looking for a new music director nearly four years ago, after Mr. Barenboim announced he was leaving. Chicago’s orchestra management found an interim solution in two other high-profile conductors, naming Bernard Haitink principal conductor and Pierre Boulez conductor emeritus. The two men will continue in their positions at least until Mr. Muti’s arrival.

Mr. Muti suddenly became a potential candidate after his abrupt resignation from La Scala, and Chicago moved into action, members of the search committee and the administration said. Weeks after his resignation Mr. Muti was in New York to conduct the Philharmonic. A group of Chicago players, staff members and trustees flew in to meet with him, said Michael Henoch, the assistant principal oboist. “We just fell in love with him as a person,” he said.

Deborah R. Card, the Chicago Symphony’s president, said she also met with Mr. Muti in early 2005 to discuss a guest appearance, as part of an effort to bring back conductors who had not led the orchestra for many years. Mr. Henoch, a member of the search committee, said the strategy was clearly aimed at seducing him into the music directorship. Mr. Muti’s last performances with Chicago had been in 1975.

“We both knew that we weren’t going to talk about anything until he worked with the orchestra,” Ms. Card said. She continued to court him with visits in various cities. The prospects seemed to dim in September 2006, when he canceled guest dates in Chicago because of illness, and when the New York Philharmonic announced his extended association.

The turning point came when Ms. Card arranged a month of dates with the orchestra at the beginning of this season, including a two-week tour to Europe and concerts in Italy.

They hit it off: love was in the air. Desire ran high. Even despite the success, some players still did not believe Mr. Muti would come to an American orchestra, Mr. Henoch said.

“This was a high-risk strategy,” he said. “I have to tell you, there was no Plan B.” In the end the tour seems to have been crucial to winning Mr. Muti over. “It really perked him up,” Mr. Henoch said.

In the interview Mr. Muti stressed that he was not picking Chicago over New York and said that he wanted to underline how much affection he had for the New Yorkers.

He likened the hiring to the experience of a confirmed bachelor who finds love and marriage at one fell swoop, and noted that at the moment he is rehearsing a Paisiello opera with the Luigi Cherubini Youth Orchestra, which he founded, called “Il Matrimonio Inaspettato,” or “The Unexpected Marriage.”

During the guest stint early this season, Mr. Muti said he was struck by the warmth of the musicians, staff members and patrons of the Chicago Symphony.

“I have found a situation,” he added, “how can I say, that has made more sweet my dry heart.”


This article has been revised to reflect the following correction:

Correction: May 12, 2008
Because of an editing error, an article on Tuesday about the Chicago Symphony Orchestra’s hiring of Riccardo Muti as its music director referred imprecisely to a role with the New York Philharmonic that Mr. Muti agreed to take last year. It is equivalent to principal guest conductor but does not carry that title.
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Old May 12th, 2008, 11:32 PM   #85
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I have been catching up on all the news from last week when I was on vacation. I did not know that Muti had accepted the directorship of the Chicago Symphony.

http://www.nytimes.com/2008/05/06/ar...UMa6v2tmQvHgNA

----------------------------

And the Brass Ring Goes to Chicago Symphony: Riccardo Muti Says Yes
By DANIEL J. WAKIN
Published: May 6, 2008
Correction Appended

The Chicago Symphony Orchestra snagged the prize.


Hiroyuki Ito for The New York Times
Riccardo Muti conducting the New York Philharmonic at Avery Fisher Hall on Jan. 17, 2008.


In a classical music world of diminishing grandeur, the orchestra has hired one of the last lions of podium glamour, Riccardo Muti, as its music director and in so doing is lending a sheen to the city’s cultural profile.

At the same time Mr. Muti’s embrace of a cold city on Lake Michigan — which he diplomatically likens to the Mediterranean waters off his native Italy — dampened spirits at the New York Philharmonic, which failed to lure him at least once and, by some accounts, including his own, possibly twice.

His decision to assume the helm in Chicago is a remarkable turnaround. As recently as September, Mr. Muti dismissed the idea of taking over the responsibilities of an American music directorship, and all the nonmusical duties the job entails. But on Monday, in his first interview since signing the contract, he said he was fully committed to the position, including supervising auditions, helping raise money and engaging in community outreach.

“From my years in Philadelphia I know exactly what I’m expected to do as music director of an American orchestra,” said Mr. Muti, 66, who was music director of the Philadelphia Orchestra from 1980 to 1992. The job, he said, was not just to make good music in the concert hall “but to serve the community.” He cited his work performing in trouble spots around the world, including the Balkans, Lebanon and Armenia, and giving concerts in places like a prison in Italy.

Mr. Muti called the Chicago Symphony “a perfect machine,” with the versatility to play huge works like Prokofiev’s Symphony No. 3 and Scriabin’s “Poem of Ecstasy” or to display the refined delicacy needed for small-scale Schubert.

He remained steadfastly unattached after resigning as music director of the Teatro Alla Scala in Milan in 2005 in an operatic kerfuffle. Orchestra musicians and other workers at the theater had turned against him in an internal political wrangle.

“I thought it was time for me to be absolutely free, like the birds in the air,” he said. “Birds go around and they enjoy their happiness, their freedom. But sometimes it can happen they find a tree, and they like to stop on a tree, and they didn’t know about the tree before. It doesn’t mean one tree is better than another tree. It just happens at the right moment in life.”

The Chicago Symphony has been without a music director since 2006, when Daniel Barenboim ended a 15-year run. In Mr. Muti it has a charismatic Italian who can draw the best from musicians, a dashing figure with flowing raven locks who also imposes a rigorous approach to the score.

The Chicago players learned about the appointment on Monday morning, when they were called to a conference room at Symphony Center and told the news. Mr. Muti will take over in the 2010-11 season. His contract will run for five years, and he is expected to conduct a minimum of 10 weeks a season and lead tours.

“The applause was giant,” said Eugene Izotov, the principal oboist, who had played under Mr. Muti during a guest appearances last fall. “We really connected in so many ways, musically, artistically, personally. His presence will add so much not just to us but to the city of Chicago. We need excitement in this business and substance, and he has both.”

Members of the storied orchestra clearly felt they had found a leader to match its stature.

“There are a few people on this planet who are really just giants of the conducting world, and he’s one of them,” said Rob Kassinger, a double bassist. “It’s just such a privilege to be able to look forward and say, ‘I’m going to get to work with this guy.’ ”

Mr. Muti turned down the music director’s job at the New York Philharmonic in 2000. Last year he agreed to take on a position equivalent to principal guest conductor, in which he was expected to spend six to eight weeks a season with the orchestra and lead it on tours, beginning in 2009 (although he now says that he did not agree to a specific number of weeks).

Speaking from his villa in Anif, Austria, near Salzburg, Mr. Muti said he would continue his association with the New York Philharmonic but suggested that his new schedule would reduce his time there. Zarin Mehta, the Philharmonic’s president, said Mr. Muti would not be back as a guest conductor once he took over the Chicago job. That, he said, made the Chicago announcement a “disappointment.” The Philharmonic musicians are known to be especially fond of playing for him.

Given the regular visits by major American orchestras to Carnegie Hall, the Philharmonic does not invite other music directors as guests, Mr. Mehta said, because “it confuses the image of an orchestra and music director.” While he said he was thrilled for the Chicago orchestra and for Mr. Muti, he added that the Philharmonic had decided a while ago to move in a “different direction, to go to a younger person who is going to spend more time with us.”

In July the Philharmonic appointed the American Alan Gilbert, 41, as its music director, to start in 2009. The Los Angeles Philharmonic similarly cast its lot with a young, non-European conductor, announcing that Gustavo Dudamel, 26, of Venezuela would be its next music director.

The Chicago Symphony began looking for a new music director nearly four years ago, after Mr. Barenboim announced he was leaving. Chicago’s orchestra management found an interim solution in two other high-profile conductors, naming Bernard Haitink principal conductor and Pierre Boulez conductor emeritus. The two men will continue in their positions at least until Mr. Muti’s arrival.

Mr. Muti suddenly became a potential candidate after his abrupt resignation from La Scala, and Chicago moved into action, members of the search committee and the administration said. Weeks after his resignation Mr. Muti was in New York to conduct the Philharmonic. A group of Chicago players, staff members and trustees flew in to meet with him, said Michael Henoch, the assistant principal oboist. “We just fell in love with him as a person,” he said.

Deborah R. Card, the Chicago Symphony’s president, said she also met with Mr. Muti in early 2005 to discuss a guest appearance, as part of an effort to bring back conductors who had not led the orchestra for many years. Mr. Henoch, a member of the search committee, said the strategy was clearly aimed at seducing him into the music directorship. Mr. Muti’s last performances with Chicago had been in 1975.

“We both knew that we weren’t going to talk about anything until he worked with the orchestra,” Ms. Card said. She continued to court him with visits in various cities. The prospects seemed to dim in September 2006, when he canceled guest dates in Chicago because of illness, and when the New York Philharmonic announced his extended association.

The turning point came when Ms. Card arranged a month of dates with the orchestra at the beginning of this season, including a two-week tour to Europe and concerts in Italy.

They hit it off: love was in the air. Desire ran high. Even despite the success, some players still did not believe Mr. Muti would come to an American orchestra, Mr. Henoch said.

“This was a high-risk strategy,” he said. “I have to tell you, there was no Plan B.” In the end the tour seems to have been crucial to winning Mr. Muti over. “It really perked him up,” Mr. Henoch said.

In the interview Mr. Muti stressed that he was not picking Chicago over New York and said that he wanted to underline how much affection he had for the New Yorkers.

He likened the hiring to the experience of a confirmed bachelor who finds love and marriage at one fell swoop, and noted that at the moment he is rehearsing a Paisiello opera with the Luigi Cherubini Youth Orchestra, which he founded, called “Il Matrimonio Inaspettato,” or “The Unexpected Marriage.”

During the guest stint early this season, Mr. Muti said he was struck by the warmth of the musicians, staff members and patrons of the Chicago Symphony.

“I have found a situation,” he added, “how can I say, that has made more sweet my dry heart.”


This article has been revised to reflect the following correction:

Correction: May 12, 2008
Because of an editing error, an article on Tuesday about the Chicago Symphony Orchestra’s hiring of Riccardo Muti as its music director referred imprecisely to a role with the New York Philharmonic that Mr. Muti agreed to take last year. It is equivalent to principal guest conductor but does not carry that title.
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Old May 13th, 2008, 06:05 PM   #86
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National Recognition for Two Chicago Theater Companies.

The nominations for the Tony Awards were announced this morning. The big Chicago news among the nominees were 7 nominations for the Steppenwolf Theater production 'August: Osage County,' which premiered in Chicago last summer and transferred to Broadway last fall.

http://leisureblogs.chicagotribune.c...-osage-co.html


In addition, the Chicago Shakespeare Theater is being recognized as Outstanding Regional Theater. This is an award that is given to only one theater company outside of New York each year. Chicago Shakespeare is the fourth Chicago theater company to win this award. (Steppenwolf, Goodman, and Victory Gardens were the others).

http://leisureblogs.chicagotribune.c...o-shakesp.html
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Old May 17th, 2008, 02:37 AM   #87
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http://www.chicagotribune.com/featur...,5783434.story

Lincoln Park debutante turns on the Porchlight in 2009

Lincoln Park is getting a major new 299-seat theater in the historic Fullerton State Bank Building at 1425 W. Fullerton Ave. And beginning in the fall of 2009, Porchlight Music Theatre will have a home to call its own.

According to Walter Stearns, the artistic director of Porchlight, a group of donor-investors has purchased the building for about $3 million and plans to start construction this fall on a new proscenium space inside the classic terra-cotta bank building, replete with a fly tower and an orchestra pit. The new venue is to be run by Stearns as the head of a new non-profit, to be known as The Lincoln Park Theater.
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Old May 22nd, 2008, 09:35 PM   #88
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From: http://www.playbill.com/news/article/117864.html

---------------------------------------

A "Steppenwolf Style"? However You Define It, the Tonys Have Embraced It
By Kenneth Jones
19 May 2008


Laurie Metcalf in November.
photo by Scott Landis.



In the direction, acting and playwriting departments, ensemble members from Chicago's Steppenwolf Theatre Company are making a strong showing in the 2008 Tony Awards.

Known for its commitment to "ensemble collaboration and artistic risk through its work with its permanent Ensemble, guest artists, partner institutions and the community," Steppenwolf has an international reputation for edgy playwriting and fierce ensemble acting — the sort of productions where you usually see all of the parts only as they relate to the whole. To put it crudely, in general, star vehicles are not what Steppenwolf is about.

Witness the large-cast, sprawling, dramatic volcano that is the Steppenwolf production of August: Osage County, the already Pulitzer Prize-winning Tracy Letts drama that is up for Tonys in the categories of Best Play, Best Lead Actress in a Play (Deanna Dunagan and Amy Morton), Best Direction of a Play (Anna D. Shapiro) and Best Featured Actress in a Play (Rondi Reed). All but Dunagan are members of the 41-person Steppenwolf Ensemble, which boasts writers, directors and actors.


Martha Plimpton in Top Girls.
photo by Joan Marcus


Two other Steppenwolf Ensemble performers are nominated for Tonys this season: Laurie Metcalf (a founding member of the Ensemble) of November and Martha Plimpton of Top Girls. Both are up against Reed in the category of Best Featured Actress in a Play.

Critics and theatregoers talk of the "Steppenwolf style" of committed ensemble performance. That style was in evidence when the troupe was founded by a troupe of nine actors in 1976. It's hard to describe the Steppenwolf style, but you know it when you see it.

Actor-playwright Letts is a Steppenwolf Ensemble member. Does he have a sense of what's meant by the "Steppenwolf style?"

"I think so," Letts told Playbill.com, adding that the idea of "ensemble" is very much in evidence in Chicago in general, not just at Steppenwolf. It just happened that Steppenwolf emerged as a major player there and spawned national stars (John Malkovich, Gary Sinise, Terry Kinney, Metcalf, among others). The troupe tends to be a focal point when looking at the kind of acting/production aesthetic that seems to come naturally in the Windy City.

"I was a member of the Chicago theatre community starting in 1986, and I didn't join this Ensemble until 2002, 2003, something like that," Letts said. "So, I was sort of steeped in the 'Chicago style' or 'storefront' style or 'ensemble acting' or 'Midwest rock 'n' roll theatre' — any of those things you want to call it — before I joined the Ensemble. I don't know, there's something to it."

How does Letts explain "ensemble acting"? "The idea that in a cast of five people, you're looking out for the other four people and that way you've always got four people looking out for you," he said. "That's kind of the ethic that propels us in Chicago. It's what I was taught, it's what I enjoy, it's what I embrace. I'm of the belief that it makes for the best theatre. That's why I'm here, that's why we do it."

How is the style evident in the Broadway production of playwright Letts' family drama August: Osage County?

"I think it's evidenced around that dinner table," Letts said. "I've had a few people comment to me, 'You staged that around the dinner table, where everyone is sitting around the table and you didn't try to open it up so everybody's facing the audience…' I have to say, that was never a consideration, nor did anybody in the cast ever say, 'Oh, are you really sure you wanna do it this way?' nor did anybody sort of jockey for position around the dinner table. They sat where [director] Anna [Shapiro] placed them. Anna and I spent a day moving people around the dinner table trying to get the order around the table just right. Nobody in that cast — not to suggest that there aren't people with tremendous egos and artistic temperaments — nobody in that cast ever questioned it; most of the actors had their backs to the audience, and still do."

Artistic director Martha Lavey told Playbill.com, "It is a question that gets asked of us: What is the Steppenwolf style? In a certain way, collectively, we would all say, 'Yeah, we recognize what you're talking about.' It's just that the palette of work that has been produced here at the theatre is so variable: Everyman, anyone? — the medieval morality play directed by Frank Galati was at our theatre about 10 years ago."

Lavey said that when people refer to "Steppenwolf style," they're talking about work that "broke outside of the theatre." She said, "We're talking about True West with John Malkovich and Gary Sinise; Balm in Gilead, this large ensemble piece; and then we're talking about [the Tony Award-winning] The Grapes of Wrath, which is very much an American populist cry."

Lavey pointed out that many of the Steppenwolf plays are "family-centered."

She said, "Jeff Perry, one of our founding members, who plays Bill in August: Osage County, when he talks about play choices — what became the aesthetic of Steppenwolf — he says, 'We're an ensemble, so we were always looking for ensemble roles for this group, and those tended to be family plays.' A label that gets applied to Steppenwolf is 'home of the dysfunctional family play.' Although as [director of new play development] Ed [Sobel] and I have remarked to each other, you start with the Greeks and then you just go through history…"

Sobel added, "When people write about families that tend to be just functional, there's not much drama in it."

Letts observed, "One of the beautiful things about Steppenwolf is the fact that you're having a hard time putting your finger on it. Because it changes. It changes very gradually, and sometimes it changes immediately, kind of like people do. It's one of the things that has kept the place alive this long. I think as soon as people start to try to codify or regulate it, it's over. I'm glad to see it's still a living, breathing thing and always changing and never predictable."

For more information about Steppenwolf Theatre Company, visit www.steppenwolf.org.

David Hawkanson is Steppenwolf's executive director.

*

Here's a look at how the Tony Awards have embraced Steppenwolf Theatre Company in the past:


In 1990, Steppenwolf's production of The Grapes of Wrath was named Best Play, and its adapter Frank Galati won the Tony for Best Direction of a Play. Also nominated were Terry Kinney and Gary Sinise (Best Featured Actor in a Play), Lois Smith (Best Featured Actress in a Play) and designers Kevin Rigdon (scenic and lighting) and Erin Quigley (costume).

In 2001, Steppenwolf's One Flew Over the Cuckoo's Nest won the Tony for Best Revival of a Play. Gary Sinise was nominated as Best Actor in a Play.

In 1996, its Buried Child was nominated for Best Play, as were featured performers James Gammon and Lois Smith, director Gary Sinise and costume designer Allison Reeds.

The 1993 production of The Song of Jacob Zulu was nominated for six Tonys, including Best Play (Tug Yourgrau is the playwright), Best Score (music and lyrics by Ladysmith Black Mambazo; lyrics by Tug Yourgrau), Best Actor in Play (K. Todd Freeman), Best Featured Actor in a Play (Zakes Mokae), Best Costume Design (Erin Quigley), Best Direction of a Play (Eric Simonson).

In 1985, Steppenwolf won the Regional Theatre Tony Award.


The cast of August: Osage County.
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Old May 27th, 2008, 09:15 PM   #89
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http://leisureblogs.chicagotribune.c...dy-rain-t.html

------------------------------------------------

'A Steady Rain' to end its fall

The commercial production of Keith Huff's "A Steady Rain" is to end June 8 at the Royal George Theatre after a very respectible and quite profitable three-and-a-half months.

The producers now have their sights set on a New York opening this fall, although casting and other details are by no means set.
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Old June 2nd, 2008, 04:41 PM   #90
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Chicago Improv Festival

If it feels like a long time since the make-'em-up fest hit the Windy City, that’s because…it has been. The annual CIF has been rescheduled to go up a month later than it did last year (Monday 2–June 8). See the early shows before the crowds hit.

http://www.timeout.com/chicago/artic...mprov-festival
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Old June 6th, 2008, 09:38 AM   #91
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Well I was bored, not going to lie, but I found a pretty cool video that gives a pretty good overview of the theater district.

Here it is...http://www.chicagotraveler.com/virtu...rict-video.htm
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Old June 8th, 2008, 09:37 AM   #92
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http://www.chicagotribune.com/entert...,1606460.story

Acrobatic Cirque Shanghai ups its game this summer

By Chris Jones | Tribune critic
June 7, 2008

ell, it took 'em three years, but Navy Pier finally has a summertime, family-oriented, international circus attraction of a quality that befits a city vying for the right to hold the Olympic Games.

To the credit of the producers, Cirque Shanghai has gotten progressively better every year.

This year's production, directed by the Ringling Brothers veteran Sylvia Hase, is still not wholly the equal of major circus attractions on, say, the Las Vegas Strip, but then the tickets cost a lot less in Chicago. And for 2008, Navy Pier has delivered a much zestier, sexier and generally more appealing show that uses talents from the Chicago theater to showcase the visiting Chinese acrobats—whose skills have been dazzling from the project's inception—to much more powerful effect.
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Old June 16th, 2008, 06:21 AM   #93
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Big Ten Network, Comcast ready to call a truce
Sources: Announcement of long-term partnership near

By Teddy Greenstein | Tribune reporter
10:16 PM CDT, June 15, 2008

Comcast and the BTN are prepared to put nearly two years of bitter negotiations aside to announce a long-term partnership, the Tribune has learned.

The deal will nearly double the number of homes that can access the BTN, from 30 million to 55 million. In the eight-state Big Ten footprint, the number will surge from 6.5 million to about 13 million.

That still leaves out about 5.5 million homes in the Midwest, but officials hope the Comcast deal will provide a framework for negotiations with prominent cable carriers Time Warner, Mediacom and Charter.

http://www.chicagotribune.com/sports...,7016110.story
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Old July 1st, 2008, 07:44 PM   #94
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I would recommend it.

http://www.nytimes.com/2008/06/30/th...=1&oref=slogin

------------------------------

So, How Would You Like Your Culture Clash? Joke-Filled or Sugar-Glazed?
By CHARLES ISHERWOOD
Published: June 30, 2008


Michael Brosilow for the NY Times.
Jon Michael Hill, left, and Michael McKean in “Superior Donuts” at the Steppenwolf.


Excerpt:

CHICAGO — Tracy Letts’s Pulitzer-and-everything-else-winning “August: Osage County” is a full theatrical meal, a nine-course tasting menu of family angst. His new play, “Superior Donuts,” which opened Saturday at the Steppenwolf Theater here, is a much less ambitious repast. It has a lot in common with the deep-fried breakfast food of the title. It’s insubstantial and sweet, with virtually no nutritional value.

Still, minor though this comedy is, it is also hard to dislike. Who doesn’t hanker for a doughnut now and then?
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Old July 23rd, 2008, 09:33 PM   #95
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After ‘Osage’ Accolades, Time to Make Doughnuts
By PATRICK HEALY
Published: July 20, 2008


Callie Lipkin for The New York Times
Tracy Letts, author of “August: Osage County,” on the set of his new play, “Superior Donuts,” at the Steppenwolf Theater in Chicago.


http://www.nytimes.com/2008/07/20/theater/20heal.html

Excerpt:

CHICAGO

TRACY LETTS was angry.

It’s not exactly what you might expect from someone who, moments earlier, had won the Tony Award for best new play for “August: Osage County,” a runaway success on Broadway. But Mr. Letts was reeling from the sort of hurly-burly that ensnares so many of his characters. His morning flight from Chicago to attend the awards ceremony had been delayed multiple times. An accident stalled traffic from Newark. He made a pit stop in Chelsea to change clothes, in a studio apartment crowded with seven other people.

“I’m walking around in a towel, I haven’t written a speech, I haven’t shaved, I’m sweating like crazy,” he recalled. But nothing compared to the absence of his father, Dennis Letts, who had been playing the patriarch of “August” until he died in February. Mr. Letts and his mother wept when an “August” actress honored him during the Tony ceremony last month; they wept when the In Memoriam segment concluded with a photograph of the elder Mr. Letts.

By the time the best play award was announced for “August” Mr. Letts was in a state. “All these people were rushing toward me onstage, and none of them my dad,” he said. “I felt closed and furious. And when I got to the press room afterward, the first question was, ‘How does it feel to win the Tony?’ and I said: ‘Right now I’m really angry. That’s something I need to look at in myself.’ ”
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Old July 31st, 2008, 05:25 AM   #96
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Going for the gold
Green jazz club takes shape in Rogers Park

By LORRAINE SWANSON
Editor
When Andy McGhee, son, Devin, and partner Bill Kerpan first entertained the idea of converting a 1912 vaudeville and silent movie house into a music venue and 'gastro' pub in the heart of Rogers Park, they never thought of going green
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Old July 31st, 2008, 05:49 AM   #97
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Awesome stuff! Good find.
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Old August 11th, 2008, 08:44 PM   #98
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http://www.chicagotribune.com/featur...,6219198.story

Historic Studebaker to receive another moment in the spotlight

By Chris Jones
August 10, 2008


The colorful owner of the historic Studebaker Theatre inside the Fine Arts Building on South Michigan Avenue has recently hired Chicago's most prominent theater architect and says he plans to quickly restore and reopen the landmark performance venue "without using a penny from the city."
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Old August 11th, 2008, 09:38 PM   #99
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Quote:
Originally Posted by spyguy View Post
http://www.chicagotribune.com/featur...,6219198.story

Historic Studebaker to receive another moment in the spotlight

By Chris Jones
August 10, 2008


The colorful owner of the historic Studebaker Theatre inside the Fine Arts Building on South Michigan Avenue has recently hired Chicago's most prominent theater architect and says he plans to quickly restore and reopen the landmark performance venue "without using a penny from the city."

This is great. I hope they do the restoration carefully and in keeping with that wonderful old building.
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Old January 13th, 2009, 08:59 AM   #100
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Has anyone checked out The Beast on A&E? It hasn't actually premiered yet, but the first episode is on Comcast On-Demand. I watched it. It has some really great shots of Chicago - a lot of neighborhood shots. I'm not totally sold on the show yet, I thought it was OK, enjoyable.

Either way, it would be cool to have more TV shows filmed here. Chicago looks good on the screen. I hope Patrick Swayze stays healthy enough for a second season.
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