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Old May 8th, 2013, 11:27 PM   #1861
kingsc
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I'm happy with the height. And 1,250 wasn't the intitial height. It was more around 1,090 than went up from there.
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Old May 8th, 2013, 11:41 PM   #1862
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Shame. I just commented in the 107 West 57th street thread, if that tower becomes a supertall Hines should consider lobbying to get the tower to its original dimensions. But I can imagine doing that would just delay the tower even longer with more filings, permits and such.
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Old May 9th, 2013, 12:07 AM   #1863
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Well with news out today that Hines sold 2 trophy buildings in NYC to a tune of $1B has got to have whomever he is working with for financing salivating to wrap things up for this project. I know the sale of these properties is totally unrelated in regard to working out financing but.... with this news, i would think this should definitely put things on the fast track for securing a loan.

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Old May 9th, 2013, 12:15 AM   #1864
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Hines will start a tower on spec if they have the funds.

And they have the funds.
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Old May 9th, 2013, 01:04 AM   #1865
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Kanto View Post
I completely agree with you, she creeps the hell out of me
You could say she's...

...a burden.
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Old May 9th, 2013, 09:00 PM   #1866
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MoMA to Announce Architect for Folk Art Museum Site
http://archrecord.construction.com/n...-Architect.asp




Quote:
The Museum of Modern Art in New York is expected to announce today that it has selected an architect to create a design for the site of the American Folk Art Museum's former home. Last month, MoMA stated its intention to raze the small museum building, an acclaimed design by Tod Williams Billie Tsien that was completed in 2001, to make way for an expansion of its own large facility on West 53rd Street in Manhattan. Word has it that the firm likely to be named is Diller Scofidio + Renfro. It is unclear whether the firm selected will be asked to study, renovate, or replace the Folk Art building.

A MoMA spokesperson said the museum will be making an announcement this afternoon, but did not confirm that the institution has chosen Diller Scofidio + Renfro for the project. The firm was unreachable for comment.

In 2011, the Folk Art Museum sold the Tod Williams Billie Tsien building to MoMA to abate life-threatening financial troubles, including $32 million in debt taken on to finance its construction. MoMA officials previously said it would demolish the building to make way for an expansion of its own facilities that includes space in an 82-story tower by Jean Nouvel to be constructed by the developer Hines.


Update:

MoMA Selects Diller Scofidio + Renfro for Expansion into Former Folk Art Museum Site, Building Could Be Saved
http://archrecord.construction.com/n...-Architect.asp

Quote:
The Museum of Modern Art in New York announced today that it has commissioned Diller Scofidio + Renfro to plan an expasion into the former site of the American Folk Art Museum. Last month, MoMA stated its intention to raze the Folk Art Museum building, an acclaimed design by Tod Williams Billie Tsien that was completed in 2001. The announcement leaves the fate of the building in question, but opens the possibility that it could be spared.
Quote:
The principals of Diller Scofidio + Renfro have asked that they be given the time and latitude to carefully consider the entirety of the site, including the former American Folk Art Museum building, in devising an architectural solution to the inherent challenges of the project. We readily agreed to consider a range of options, and look forward to seeing their results.”

In a statement of its own, Diller Scofidio + Renfro said: “This is a complex project that also involves issues of urban interface, concerns that are central to our studio. We have asked MoMA, and they have agreed, to allow us the time and flexibility to explore a full range of programmatic, spatial, and urban options. These possibilities include, but are not limited to, integrating the former American Folk Art Museum building, designed by our friends and admired colleagues, Tod Williams and Billie Tsien.”

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Old May 9th, 2013, 11:24 PM   #1867
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http://www.nytimes.com/2013/05/10/ar...m.html?hp&_r=0

MoMA Reconsiders Plan to Raze Folk Art Museum Ozier Muhammad/The New York Times
The American Folk Art Museum.

By ROBIN POGREBIN
Published: May 9, 2013


After impassioned protests from prominent architects, preservationists and design critics, the Museum of Modern Art said on Thursday that it would reconsider its decision to demolish its next-door neighbor, the former home of the American Folk Art Museum, to make room for an expansion....


The MoMA expansion would consist of five buildings, including an 82-story residential tower just west of the folk museum. Designed by the French architect Jean Nouvel, the high-rise is being developed by Hines, a Houston company, and will also include exhibition space for the museum....

The expansion is expected to give the museum about 10,000 square feet of additional gallery space at the former folk art site and about 40,000 in the Nouvel building. The Modern wants its second, fourth and fifth floors to line up with those in the other two buildings. (The second-floor galleries are double height.)

The content of these new galleries and the cost of the project are still to be determined, MoMA said.
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Old May 10th, 2013, 01:15 AM   #1868
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Yeah fantastic.
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Old May 10th, 2013, 11:38 AM   #1869
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What does any of that mean for this tower?
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Old May 10th, 2013, 01:36 PM   #1870
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They'll probably just incorporate the buildings they were going to demolish into the design. They did something like that in London after an outcry over the demolition of a bar for a residential tower, ending up with this:



The brick building was originally meant to go. The pubic feeling saved it, but didn't actually damage the overall plan. I expect it will be the same case here.
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Old May 10th, 2013, 01:53 PM   #1871
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Hopefully that's the solution they go for. I can actually picture the Folk Art Museum and Tower Verre going together pretty well.
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Old May 10th, 2013, 02:03 PM   #1872
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They rarely do that in NY. The controversy over razing this structure is B.S. There is no respect for old structures in the US. It's all about money.
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Old May 10th, 2013, 06:19 PM   #1873
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They may try to incorporate the building into the base of the tower? Otherwise just leave the front facade standing.
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Old May 10th, 2013, 06:32 PM   #1874
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the good news is whatever they decide with the Folk Structure is that Tower Verre can start because it is not part of it. The Folk is a separate project that is part of the overall renovating of their expansion.

Why Is the Museum of Modern Art Dead Set on Perpetrating a Hideous Act of Architecture-cide?
http://www.vanityfair.com/online/dai...deshow_item0_1

here is an excerpt from the Vanity Fair:

Quote:
We look to MoMA for judgment and taste-making, not for rank indifference to aesthetic matters. Of course the folk-art museum looks different from the Museum of Modern Art. It was supposed to. The American Folk Art Museum has never been anything but a small institution, and part of the architectural challenge Williams and Tsien faced was to give it a strong, independent identity so that it would not disappear entirely beside its enormous neighbor. The façade of folded planes of hammered bronze that they produced combines the monumental dignity of a good civic building with the intimate texture of a handcrafted work—no small accomplishment.

By now everyone knows that the folk-art museum ran into financial difficulties, retreated in 2011 to what had been its satellite facility near Lincoln Center, and put the Williams-Tsien building up for sale. Naturally MoMA bought it. The Modern was already gearing up to expand yet again (it had opened its last expansion, designed by Yoshio Taniguchi, in 2004), in the form of several floors of new exhibit space at the bottom of an 82-story condominium tower by the architect Jean Nouvel that the Houston-based developer Hines was planning to construct at 53 West 53rd Street, just down the block from MoMA. The museum was deeply involved in that project from the start—it had sold the land to Hines in 2007—and Nouvel’s plans called for working his tower around the folk-art museum. Back then, no one expected the little museum would go belly up.

That’s a key point. It’s obviously not necessary that the folk-art museum be torn down so that the new tower—which is one of the more promising skyscrapers to be proposed for New York in years, although that is quite beside the point—can be built. The original design called for the tower to have gone around the folk-art museum, and if the crash of 2008 hadn’t caused the tower project to be postponed, that’s what would have happened. It was presumed that the folk-art museum and MoMA would retain their minnow-to-whale relationship forever.

But what a difference a recession makes. Down went the stock market, onto the shelf went the plans for Nouvel’s building, and then down went the folk-art museum. And now, as the project comes back to life, MoMA announces that the folk-art museum has to go. It doesn’t fit; its galleries are too small to be used effectively for the Modern’s collections; the little building’s floors do not line up with MoMA’s.
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Old May 10th, 2013, 06:41 PM   #1875
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If it's not related why we read about it in this thread then?
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Old May 10th, 2013, 06:51 PM   #1876
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Quote:
Originally Posted by patrykus View Post
If it's not related why we read about it in this thread then?

I don't know why it's posted here except, because it's part of the MOMA expansion project. I just edited my post above and included an article from the vanity fair. Basically razing the folk art in the Minds of the people in MOMA think asthetic wise the Folk will not fit with the overall look of what they are envisioning.
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Old May 10th, 2013, 07:00 PM   #1877
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Quote:
Originally Posted by iamtheSTIG View Post
What does any of that mean for this tower?
They will just include this "stump" inside the bigger museum collection. sort of like a folk art wing.

IMHO there is nothing in this building that is so precious. It has only nice bronze (I think this is copper actually) siding which makes it modern in its looks. Take the siding out and it has nothing. So I would just take it out and use it in the new building if this is so interesting to people.

I mean if we were talking about razing the Met with its magnificent entrance (Copy of Baths of Caracalla in ancient Rome) this would be a travesty and I would be mad to see even Tower Verre on its place. But this here is just a crazy case of New York NIMBYs going completely mental.



p.s. IMHO all the museums same as hospitals in NYC are moving in the same direction of consolidating their treasures, no matter how different the theme of the museum is, in a few huge buildings. Because it is way cheaper, than have multitude of smaller ones. So I would not be surprised or upset to see Rembrandt next to Kondinsky in one building or even wing. Space in NYC is very very expensive. Maintenance is also a huge thing financially. less prominent museums cannot keep up with these prices, yet their collection is worth being seen. So naturally my solution would be - combine them with bigger ones. And that is exactly what is going on.
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Old May 11th, 2013, 09:26 PM   #1878
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That Folk Art Museum building facade looks like something that should have an urban waterfall cascading down its face. And the interior is a disaster. No loss if they demolish it.
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Old May 23rd, 2013, 01:09 AM   #1879
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http://blogs.wsj.com/developments/20...ake-manhattan/

May 22, 2013, 4:44 PM.Small Footprints, Tall Towers: Skinny Condos Take Manhattan.Article Comments Developments HOME PAGE ».smaller Larger .
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smaller Larger facebooktwittergoogle pluslinked ininShare.0EmailPrintBy Eliot Brown

dbox/CIM Group & Macklowe Properties
432 Park, shown in this rendering, is slated to rise nearly 1,400 feet when completed in 2015, which would make it the tallest residential building in the U.S.Another day, another plan for a soaring, skinny Manhattan condo tower.

As reported in Wednesday’s Wall Street Journal, developer Bruce Eichner has reached a series of deals to buy a development site south of Manhattan’s Madison Square Park, where he plans a nearly 800-foot condo tower on a lot just 50 feet wide, according to people familiar with the matter.

Such towering ambitions have become all the rage in Manhattan these days, as booming demand for super-luxury apartments in the country’s most expensive real-estate market has changed the economics of development. Apartment builders used to prefer wide sites that could take months or years to assemble, as building tall and thin is a pricey proposition. But with buyers paying more than $3,000 per square foot for sweeping views 40 stories in the air—or more than $5,000 in some cases—suddenly it pencils financially to build even on small lots. (That is, assuming buyers will continue to pay such sums.)

So long as the zoning in key parts of Manhattan is without height restrictions and developers can assemble the needed air rights from neighboring property owners, the building boom stands to change the New York skyline, sprinkling it with needle-like towers that reach to the skies. And unlike the typical office skyscraper—which can hold 5,000-plus workers—these buildings are set to host between 80 and 150 families, some of whom aren’t planning on living in them full time.

While tall and thin towers are popping up outside of New York as well—they tend to be in land-starved spots like Vancouver, Hong Kong and Singapore—the boom in Manhattan is particularly notable given the spate of new projects started since late 2010.

Here’s a rundown of others in New York that are under way:

432 Park, a 1,396-foot under-construction tower on Park Avenue that looks like giant checkerboard stretched out on a stick, with floors that are about 8,250 square feet in size. Dozens of units are priced above $15 million.

One57, the 1,004-foot tower just south of Central Park that’s nearly finished. Developer Extell has said two buyers have agreed to pay more than $90 million apiece for two penthouses.

30 Park Place, a 926-foot Robert A.M. Stern-designed tower that is set to host a Four Seasons two blocks north of the World Trade Center site. Developer Larry Silverstein and his partner earlier this month reached a financing deal for the building, which is scheduled to start construction in the fall.

56 Leonard, the nearly-800 foot tower rising in TriBeCa that’s slated to look like a giant glass Jenga set. Construction began recently.

Baccarat Hotel, a 605-foot Starwood Capital Group project on 53rd Street west of Fifth Avenue that is under construction. Condos are slated to be on the top floors, with the rest of the building a hotel.


One Madison Park, a 597-foot slim tower on East 23rd Street. It was nearly completed, but stalled during the real estate bust. A new set of developers including the Related Cos. are finishing it now.

Others planned, but not as far along in financing or construction:

Extell Development has filed a building permit application to construct a 1,550-foot tower in Midtown atop the city’s first Nordstrom, which would be 300 feet taller than the Empire State Building. The developer has tapped Adrian Smith + Gordon Gill Architecture to design the building.

Hines/MoMA tower, a 1,050 foot spear-like tower designed by Jean Nouvel that’s been planned since 2007.....
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Old May 23rd, 2013, 03:39 AM   #1880
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56 Leonard got a height decrease?
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