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Old February 26th, 2008, 01:32 PM   #21
muster
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Hmm, I need more time on this one, but maybe its Grønlandsleiret? Not sure really. The two buildings in front look very familiar..
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Old March 1st, 2008, 04:23 AM   #22
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Sorry dude, you are way off, reason being that this street has been looking nothing like in that photo for some time now. The clue to where this is is the larger building at the end of the block, this still being a very important judiciary building.

Stortingsgaten looks nothing like it once did









This little street was once called Filosofgangen, stand here today and you will be looking straight at the City Hall facade.





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Old March 4th, 2008, 12:39 AM   #23
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Hmm, you are killing me here. I give up, but nice photos though
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Old April 12th, 2008, 12:34 PM   #24
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Bumping this thread with a sketch of the original plans for the government building, now housing the department of Finance.



Only one wing of this pretty gigantic, for Norwegian standards, four wing government building was ever built. Which is a shame because what was intended by the architect doesn't really come out clearly in the one wing that was built. Also, it would have been more unique in terms of it being jugend style and monumental at the same time.
Still its a nice building, with some clear jugend features.



The complex was originally intended to be in a renaissance historicism style, but before the project got underway, there was a change in architect and the style changed markedly. The architect was Henrik Bull, the same guy who did the Historic museum. It was not completed entirely because of lack of funds, the usual story.
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Old June 10th, 2008, 04:33 PM   #25
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A little update today focusing on the suburbs or forsteder that cropped up around Christiania after the city was founded in 1624. These were basically slums where people who could not afford to live in the city built their wooden shacks. In a refurbished and more livable state, a lot of people would probably find them charming, as is the case with the remnants at Telthusbakken.

Anway, here is a glimpse at Piperviken and Vaterland, as they once looked.

Pipervika 1840





This house bore the address Bakkegaten, where city hall is standing today. It was used primarily as a brothel.



Around the same area, Henrik Ibsen actually lived here when he moved to Christiania for the first time in 1850.



Vaterland, by the Aker river, around 1875.



Another image of Akerselva before it became industrialised

Throughout the 18th century about half the population in the area lived in these slums. ca. 4500 out of ca. 9000 souls. Several decrees from Copenhagen had called for them to be cleared out but this never really happened. The interesting thing is how much Norway, at least this region, resembled a third world country back then. Wealth was consolidated in a few hands that mostly relied on export of some raw materials, mainly timber. The cultivated land around the city was originally intended by the king as public land for all the citizens but quickly ended up privatized in a few hands. half the city's population, the people in these forsteder, were in effect squatters on this land, small time traders living in miserable conditions.
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Old June 21st, 2008, 06:24 AM   #26
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The proposal which finalized the location of the new Storting (parliament) was first raised in 1853. The final decision was taken in 1857 and proposals for this site had already been called for the year before.
The commission chose the following proposal by architects Schirmer and von Hanno:



There was immediate criticism of the neo-gothic style and particularly the tower which it was said made it look more like a church. This led to this revision of the design.



The proposal by the Swedish architect Emil Victor Langlet was actually submitted 1 month after Schirmer and von Hanno had been picked as winners, and after the deadline. However, as we know, it was his proposal that won the day, after a decision which was finally taken in 1859.

Langlet's proposal:



Also here are two proposals that didn't make it against Schirmer and von Hanno:

The first one is signed Tentare Licet, not quite clear who was the architect



The second is signed Luckow, presumably a German architect

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Old June 21st, 2008, 03:21 PM   #27
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Thanks for your work on this thread Joamox. Always interesting to see what could have been. I like the first proposal. Oslo dont have any great churches or cathedrals, so this building would have been very welcome, though I also like todays Stortinget. I think maybe a second tower on the other side could make it look less like a church.
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Old June 22nd, 2008, 08:18 AM   #28
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Some earlier proposals from Grosch and Linstow

Grosch's proposal is from 1835, at that time they were thinking they would put the new parliament within the actual city, close to Akershus fortress and Bank square.

Front

and back


It was decided, however, to wait until the royal palace stood finished.

Linstow wanted to place the parliament opposite the university on the new street leading up to the royal palace.
He had in mind a central square about half up Slotsvejen, now Karl Johans gate:





It was decided, however, that the location did not meet the criteria for a parliament, because of weak foundations. This did not stop the national theatre from being built here some 50 years later. The theatre was, as we know, not built in accordance to Linstow's plans for a square.
The university square can be considered to be half the square Linstow had in mind.
The universitycomplex itself was built by Christian Grosch, with the assistance of the famous German architect Schinkel. Linstow originally wanted a medieval Florentine style for the university, as opposed to Groschs classical design.
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Last edited by joamox; September 27th, 2009 at 11:12 AM.
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Old September 9th, 2008, 04:07 AM   #29
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Took some photos last month to show some of the changes done to the city over the last 100 years or so.





The building in the middle was actually destroyed due to allied bombing during WWII, since the Gestapo used neighboring Victoria terasse as headquarters. The modern replacement is used as a entrance to the Foreign office. Victoria terasse itself was unharmed, but a bit of its facade is now covered by the postwar building. The building to the immediate right, on Henrik Ibsens gate, has lost its mansard corner roof as a result of an added floor, erasing totally the building's French influence. To the left can be seen glimpses of old Vika.





Karl Johansgt 15 / Stortorvet 6 (Robsahmgården) burned in 1959 and was subsequently torn down and replaced by this huge building which also dominates all of Oslo's central square. It also pulled a bit further back from Karl Johans gate, presumably in anticipation of a general widening of the street.





Stortorvet 7 and 9 were also demolished to make way for the same building. As seen from the middle of the square.





A much less crowded Stortorvet these days.





Also seen from the square, The facade of Hasselgården at the corner of Torggata was lost in the seventies. Its successor is currently receiving a coat of white paint.





Collettgården in Kirkegaten was a baroque palais from the 18th century, and was actually supposed to be protected from demolition. Nonetheless, it was demolished in the 30's and replaced by a modern office building. A copy of Collett can be found in the Folkmuseum on Bygdoy.





The bank building opposite Collett was built in the early 20th century replacing of one of the city's last half timbered buildings, a style which had been dominant up until the 18th century, see below.



In Frogner, changes have not been so radical as in parts of sentrum. However, the loss of certain decorative elements due to renovation and often the adding of new floors is very common. The examples below are both from the corner of Bygdoy alle and Thomas Heftyes gate.







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Old October 26th, 2008, 07:10 PM   #30
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Changing the format of this thread slightly towards something similar to Frekis dose of Copenhagen concept. Wont be updating every day though, but Ill post one photo at a time from time to time, depending abit on the amount of response, so you can reflect on each as we go along. I have plenty more historic photos and sketches that havent been posted yet, so there is no shortage of material. Let me know if there is any specific things people want to see, and Ill see what I can do.



To start of, Eidsvolls Plass seen from the air, 1906, with the old Grandkvartalet to the left and domkirken dominating the skyline. Storting in the centre.
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Old October 26th, 2008, 09:02 PM   #31
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Me likes this thread.

Keep posting more in the future

BTW: Not too much has changed around Eidsvolls Plass from the picture above. Can't see the tower on the Grand Hotel. And the Freia sign is nowhere to be seen. And it looks like a tram (?) down Karl Johan
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Old October 26th, 2008, 10:28 PM   #32
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hm, well, nothing apart from the fact that all the buildings on the northern side have been demolished and replaced by new ones, while on the southern side two of four buildings have survived, but thats barely noticeable from that picture. You cant see the tower on Grand because that building had not been constructed yet, it came between 1911 and 1913. Grand opened originally in 1874 though, in one of the original classical/empire buildings fronting Karl Johans gate, there being three in total: Bardoe-gården, Fuhr-gården and Heiberg-gården.
Also Saras Telt obviously didnt exist back then, nor modern statues.
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Old October 27th, 2008, 08:00 PM   #33
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New image for today, this is Stortorvet anno 1829



It depicts a riot of some kind related to the suppression of a 17th of May celebration. As you can see, the evil Swedish soldiers are pouncing poor civilians. Actually, the soldiers involved in this incident were probably Norwegians, but lets blame the Swedes.

The layout of the square is still the same but none of the buildings from this time have survived, except the Stortorvet gjestgiveri house and the cathedral, which has been altered to the point of being unrecognizable.
The mansion in the centre looks typical of 18th century Christiania, but I havent found any more information related to it.
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Old October 27th, 2008, 08:28 PM   #34
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The order came from the Swedish "Stattholder" directly under Karl Johan.. ;D
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Old October 27th, 2008, 08:29 PM   #35
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I visited Olso this summer, and although I had some positive surprises, such as Wikeland Parken, Akerbrygge, and the Frogner Quarter (at least I think that was the name?), I couldn’t help but feel that Oslo was quite dull and messy looking. Seeing these old photos reinforces the feeling that Oslo has missed its chance of being a charming and cohered town/city, which seems to be primarily due to an over eagerness to destroyed and replace.
I know that this is true for many towns/city’s, but I found it very present in Oslo.
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Old October 27th, 2008, 09:24 PM   #36
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Thanks for your interesting perspective..
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Old October 28th, 2008, 03:13 AM   #37
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Quote:
Originally Posted by StigJ View Post
I visited Olso this summer, and although I had some positive surprises, such as Wikeland Parken, Akerbrygge, and the Frogner Quarter (at least I think that was the name?), I couldn’t help but feel that Oslo was quite dull and messy looking. Seeing these old photos reinforces the feeling that Oslo has missed its chance of being a charming and cohered town/city, which seems to be primarily due to an over eagerness to destroyed and replace.
I know that this is true for many towns/city’s, but I found it very present in Oslo.
A true perfect city is actually those with big contrasts and somewhat messy architecture/infastructure etc. If you see Oslo with those eyes when you visit it you will enjoy it much more.
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Old October 28th, 2008, 10:24 PM   #38
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I kind of agree with StigJ. many wrong buildings have been build trhough the years. The building under "utenriksdepartementet" as a good example of something very ugly. But i hope that new parts of town in "fjordbyen will make the city centre looks bettre.
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Old October 28th, 2008, 10:47 PM   #39
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Don’t get me wrong, I was generally positively surprised with Oslo, besides the things a mentioned above, I would also mention all the great modern art everywhere, and the 30 degree + weather obviously helped a lot.

True, great cities are very diverse, and thus have many contrasts, (Berlin being a great example IMO) but having contrast does not automatically make a city great. I just had the feeling that the Oslo city planners were too eager to build a city, in the sense that they destroyed too much of the town. The town seemed to be very charming, and I think that, that old town charm has disappeared, e.g. the area around Victoria Terasse. Seeing the old photos just reminded me of those thoughts.
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Old October 28th, 2008, 10:56 PM   #40
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Hope you come back when the fjordby part is finish (big project in the old harbour areas) and see what you think of that

Anyway. Think Grünnerløkka is much more charming than the city centre
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