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Old May 1st, 2013, 05:39 PM   #2501
Vertical_Gotham
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Hudson Yards New York Video: "Look Up"




Sorry.. i'm trying to figure out posting the actual video on this post instead of the link. Practicing here. lol

update:

I did it after 20 mins! Lol.
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Old May 1st, 2013, 07:13 PM   #2502
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Office developers compete for anchor tenants on Manhattan’s western edge
http://therealdeal.com/issues_articles/the-far-side/

Quote:
Related's North and South Tower

Size: North Tower, 2.4 million sq. ft.; South Tower, 1.7 million sq.

Expected delivery: South Tower, 2016; North Tower, 2018

Quote:
Brookfield's Manhattan West

Developer: Brookfield Office Properties

Size: North Tower, 2.2 million square feet; South Tower, 3.2 million square feet

Expected delivery: 2016 or 2017

"Brookfield has largely finalized the design of the North Tower, but could build it or the larger South Tower first, or even both simultaneously, depending on the anchor tenants’ needs, Mosler said."
Interesting that they say the south tower would be larger.

Quote:
3 Hudson Boulevard - The GiraSole

Developer: The Moinian Group

Size: 1.8 million square feet

Expected completion date: 2016

"Some consider the Moinian Group’s 3 Hudson Boulevard to be the best-positioned of the Far West Side’s new buildings: It sits on top of the No. 7 subway station and across from the Jacob K. Javits Convention Center.

Another advantage to the FXFOWLE Architects–designed project is that “you are not on a platform, you are on bedrock,” said Arthur Mirante, president of the tristate region for commercial firm Avison Young, which is handling leasing at 3 Hudson Boulevard"

Quote:
1 Hudson Yards

Developer: Extell Development

Size: 1.75 million square feet

Expected completion date: TBD

"Construction will not start until a tenant or tenants have committed to take at least 400,000 square feet of space, said Jones Lang LaSalle Managing Director Derek Trulson, who is part of a team handling leasing at 1 Hudson Yards."

"the site is “central to all of the Hudson Yards district.”

And unlike the multitowered Related and Brookfield sites, which some tenants worry could be under construction for years, “we are one building,” Trulson said.

He declined to specify the asking rent, but said Extell would fight for tenants."

“We are going to be competitive,” he said. “The nature of the site and our basis allows us to be. We believe we will be as competitive as anyone in the market.”

Quote:
450 Hudson Park Boulevard

Developer: Alloy Development (possibly with Boston Properties)

Size: 1.1 million square feet

Expected completion date: TBD
Quote:
447 10th Avenue

Developer: Sherwood Equities

Size: 2.5 million square feet

Expected completion date: TBD

"the firm is in no hurry to start construction on the massive office project, Nelson said, and Sherwood is not competing as fiercely for tenants as some of the other developers in the area.

“We are not being as aggressive as the others,” Nelson said. With rents in the untested neighborhood still relatively low, the firm feels that “it does not make sense to fight tooth and nail.”

He said he expects rents in the area to rise dramatically once tenants start moving in to other new buildings.

Sherwood is nonetheless on the lookout for tenants in need of large chunks of space. Sources said the firm responded to an inquiry from Time Warner about potentially taking space at 447 10th.

Nelson declined to comment on Time Warner specifically, but confirmed that Sherwood would indeed respond “if a tenant came along that needed 2 million square feet.”
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Old May 1st, 2013, 07:37 PM   #2503
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some news on ny curbed

http://ny.curbed.com/places/hudson-yards#active

ACTIVE DISCUSSIONS / NEWEST POSTS
Budget Woes

hy-ralph-lauren-010813.jpgIf you've been paying attention to the last decade of NYC development, you're aware that Hudson Yards has moved a helluva lot slower than anticipated. As such, the west side megaproject has been something of a money-suck for the city—it was supposed to start paying for itself by 2008. It's 2013 and only one office tower is rising. Hudson Yards was supposed to generate $283 million in 2012, and it only created $170 million. Plus, the city has been funneling hundreds of millions of dollars into the project. Now, budget officials want the Midtown East rezoning to be delayed so Hudson Yards, where planned towers are struggling to find commercial tenants, doesn't see even more competition. [WSJ; previously]



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Old May 1st, 2013, 08:07 PM   #2504
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http://therealdeal.com/issues_articles/the-far-side/


Office developers compete for anchor tenants on Manhattan’s western edge
With only a finite number of large potential renters, the fight for office tenants on the West Side is heating up

May 01, 2013
By Adam Pincus

Only a few times in modern Manhattan history has an entirely new office district sprung up all at once. In the 1930s, there was Rockefeller Center; the 1970s saw the World Trade Center complex; and today, developers are planning nearly 15 million square feet of new office space in the Hudson Yards area in the 30s on the Far West Side.

The new projects expected to rise over the next decade include the Related Companies’ North and South towers at Hudson Yards, Extell Development’s One Hudson Yards, Brookfield Office Properties’ Manhattan West and Moinian’s 3 Hudson Boulevard, as well as Sherwood Equities’ 447 10th Avenue and Alloy Development’s 450 Hudson Park Boulevard.

But before starting construction on these new towers, developers must first land an anchor tenant willing to take at least 400,000 square feet of space. With only a finite number of large potential renters, the competition for office tenants is heating up, as some of the city’s top commercial leasing brokers and developers battle each other with slick marketing campaigns and — of course — behind-the-scenes jabs at rival projects.

Many companies are deeply reluctant to move to newly constructed buildings, especially in an untested neighborhood, brokers said.

For most companies, it’s cheaper to stay in place and renovate, explained Joseph Harbert, president of the Eastern Region for Colliers International. And some firms fear that moving out of prime Midtown, with its bevy of transportation options, will cause them to lose employees.

Related Hudson Yards President Jay Cross agreed, saying: “We compete against renewals as much as new construction.”

In 2011, fashion manufacturer Coach signed on to be an anchor tenant of Related’s South Tower. But Coach was already located a few blocks away, in a building directly in the path of Hudson Yards bulldozers. For many of the other big companies whose names are being kicked around as possible anchor tenants, a move to the Far West Side would represent a significant geographic shift from Midtown or Downtown.

There are currently 10 to 20 companies said to be on the hunt for large chunks of Manhattan office space, brokers said. These include media companies Time Warner, Sony, CBS and News Corp.; law firms White & Case and Skadden, Arps, Slate, Meagher & Flom; advertising firm GroupM; financial giant Credit Suisse; and fashion house Ralph Lauren.

Brokers for the new Hudson Yards–area towers are fighting to lure these tenants, but their efforts could be in vain if companies decide to stay in their current locations, or move to existing office towers instead.

Despite these challenges, Hudson Yards so far appears to be beating the odds. Last month, Related snagged two more tenants for the South Tower: French cosmetics maker L’Oreal and software firm SAP.

Developers in the area are also competing for tax benefits. A 15-year, 40 percent property tax reduction is being offered for the first 5 million square feet of office space to be built west of 10th Avenue.

Related said last month that it will apply for the tax break for the South Tower, which would leave about 3.3 million square feet up for grabs. After the first 5 million, the tax break drops to 25 percent.

But some developers may hold off on construction until the neighborhood is more established and competition wanes.

“We are waiting until rents get really attractive before we build,” said Ryan Nelson, senior vice president at Sherwood Equities. “Truthfully, it will probably be the next [construction] cycle.”

For the time being, sources said asking rents for most of the new towers range from $80 to $90 per square foot.

This month, The Real Deal took an in-depth look at the new towers planned for the Far West Side, and how they’re faring in the race to nab tenants.

North and South Tower

Size: North Tower, 2.4 million sq. ft.; South Tower, 1.7 million sq.

Expected delivery: South Tower, 2016; North Tower, 2018

In the most highly anticipated project on the Far West Side, Related and Oxford Properties have teamed up on a $15 billion, 26-acre Hudson Yards mixed-used project. Last month, Related made major headway on the project when it inked a 99-year, $1 billion lease for the eastern portion of the Metropolitan Transit Authority’s rail yards, which stretch from 30th to 33rd streets and from 10th to 11th avenues.


Jones Lang LaSalle Managing Director Derek Trulson, who is part of a team marketing 1 Hudson Yards
Construction started in December on the South Tower, which is located at 501 West 30th Street and is the first building planned for the parcel. It took more than three years to lure Coach, which ultimately purchased a 740,000-square-foot commercial condo from Related. (As part of the deal, Related agreed to acquire Coach’s building a block north at 516 West 34th Street.) Now, the South Tower is more than 80 percent leased (including expansion options), with L’Oreal in contract to occupy 402,000 square feet and SAP having signed a lease for 115,000 square feet.

Related will have to do it all over again with its second, larger building, the North Tower. Adding to the challenge is that the North Tower, designed by Kohn Pedersen Fox Associates, will rise on an 8.6-acre platform covering active Long Island Rail Road tracks. (Construction on the $750 million platform will also provide a foundation for several other buildings.)

Competing brokers who asked not to be identified said potential tenants might have a hard time imagining the long-discussed platform being constructed any time soon.

But Related’s Cross said construction on the platform will start in January. That would allow for delivery of the building in 2018, as long as an anchor tenant is in place, he said.

As a selling point, Related is highlighting the large footprint of the North Tower, which financial firms could use for trading floors. Plus, the skyscraper will be adjacent to a planned 500,000-square-foot retail building, which Related hopes will allay tenants’ concerns about being isolated on the Far West Side with few food and shopping options.

“We are part of a mixed-use project,” Cross said, “so you don’t have to think about an in-house cafeteria [like] you might in other projects.”

To sweeten the pot, Related is also offering to swap properties or sell portions of the building as commercial condos, as it did with Coach. Related has also offered that the first companies that sign on for space will get in “at cost.”

Cross pegged the approximate asking rent for the North Tower at $90 per square foot and the price for a condo sale at between $900 and $1,100 per foot, for a hypothetical 1 million square feet.

Manhattan West

Developer: Brookfield Office Properties

Size: North Tower, 2.2 million square feet; South Tower, 3.2 million square feet
Expected delivery: 2016 or 2017

Brookfield first announced the Manhattan West project more than five years ago during the real estate boom. Designed by Skidmore, Owings & Merrill, the project would also sit atop railroad tracks, requiring a platform to cover them.

Like many projects dreamed up back then, Manhattan West was halted during the downturn. Then in 2011, the plans were dusted off and reintroduced, with a cheaper platform that would be built more quickly. But after being on the market for nearly two years — longer than any other project except Related’s — Manhattan West still has not landed an anchor tenant. Furthermore, the towers have evolved from a commercial-only concept to one that could include residential as well.

Despite not having a tenant, Brookfield plans to begin construction of the $300 million platform in August, with completion set for October 2014, according to Bruce Mosler, chairman of global brokerage at Cushman & Wakefield. Mosler’s team was hired to market and lease Manhattan West.

Brookfield has largely finalized the design of the North Tower, but could build it or the larger South Tower first, or even both simultaneously, depending on the anchor tenants’ needs, Mosler said.

“There are use groups we are talking to that would encompass one tower, and there are users we are talking to that would require us to build [both] towers” at the same time, Mosler said.

Real estate executives not involved with Brookfield’s project said Time Warner is looking closely at the two towers, as well as at Related’s project.

Mosler and Jeremiah Larkin, senior vice president and director of leasing at Brookfield, ticked off the advantages of the site, including the South Tower’s 90,000-square-foot floor plates, the largest of the six competing projects. Insiders also noted that the platform will be just 2.6 acres (compared to roughly 8.6 acres on Related’s site), so it will be easier to construct.

“We have the best location,” Larkin said, noting the project is just a block from Penn Station.

But the tradeoff is that the project will receive tax breaks of only 25 percent, compared with the more generous 40 percent decrease for projects west of 10th Avenue.

Mosler and Larkin would not reveal the asking rent, saying only that the rents would be “competitive.”

3 Hudson Boulevard

Developer: The Moinian Group

Size: 1.8 million square feet

Expected completion date: 2016

Some consider the Moinian Group’s 3 Hudson Boulevard to be the best-positioned of the Far West Side’s new buildings: It sits on top of the No. 7 subway station and across from the Jacob K. Javits Convention Center.

Another advantage to the FXFOWLE Architects–designed project is that “you are not on a platform, you are on bedrock,” said Arthur Mirante, president of the tristate region for commercial firm Avison Young, which is handling leasing at 3 Hudson Boulevard. He said he also points out to potential tenants that “no water got anywhere near this with [Hurricane] Sandy. [Yet] you are on the Hudson River with water views.”

Like Related did with Coach, Moinian will look for prospective tenants that would want to sell their existing building in exchange for a condo unit at 3 Hudson, Mirante said.

Asking rents in the 1.8 million-square-foot building are currently $85 per square foot, according to Mirante, but ultimately, “We hope to achieve in excess of $100 [per foot] in the tower.”

A challenge facing the project is that while Moinian is well known as a residential developer and an office owner, the firm has limited experience as a ground-up, Class A office tower builder. Moinian’s residential management was criticized in the wake of Hurricane Sandy, and insiders said the company’s access to construction financing is not as strong as other developers’. For that reason, sources expect Moinian to partner with a more-established office landlord to move the project forward, much as it did with SL Green Realty at 3 Columbus Circle.

In response to those criticisms, a spokesperson for Moinian said the company has three decades of development experience and strong relationships with lenders, and issued the following statement: “The Moinian Group is looking forward to breaking ground on 3 Hudson Boulevard and efficiently delivering this elegant office tower to Manhattan’s new West Side.”

The spokesperson declined to comment on whether Moinian is planning to partner with another developer on the project.

1 Hudson Yards

Developer: Extell Development

Size: 1.75 million square feet

Expected completion date: TBD

Extell Development, headed by Gary Barnett, owns a parcel at 34th Street, just south of Moinian’s. Barnett is planning to construct 1 Hudson Yards, a 1.75 million-square-foot office building, on the site. But construction will not start until a tenant or tenants have committed to take at least 400,000 square feet of space, said Jones Lang LaSalle Managing Director Derek Trulson, who is part of a team handling leasing at 1 Hudson Yards.

But he said the MTA is readying the foundation for the Extell site as it builds the new No. 7 subway station, which gives the project “a running start” in terms of “speed to market and certainty of delivery.”

Extell has a reputation as a prolific residential and commercial builder, and is currently completing the 748,000-square-foot Gem Tower office building at 50 West 47th Street in the Diamond District.

But this parcel, like Moinian’s, is located on 11th Avenue, which could make it more difficult to lure tenants, brokers said.

Trulson, however, said the site is “central to all of the Hudson Yards district.”

And unlike the multitowered Related and Brookfield sites, which some tenants worry could be under construction for years, “we are one building,” Trulson said.

He declined to specify the asking rent, but said Extell would fight for tenants.

“We are going to be competitive,” he said. “The nature of the site and our basis allows us to be. We believe we will be as competitive as anyone in the market.”

450 Hudson Park Boulevard

Developer: Alloy Development (possibly with Boston Properties)

Size: 1.1 million square feet

Expected completion date: TBD

Alloy Development is far less well-known than its competitors, and its site is the smallest of those now vying for tenants.

Alloy assembled the site — west of 10th Avenue between 35th and 36th streets — in 2007. The location has been cleared and stands ready for a tenant, but there’s no set development plan in place, according to Alloy president Jared Della Valle, an architect and developer.

Brooklyn-based Bernheimer Architecture drafted a rendering, but the design was created to give tenants an idea of what the site could look like, and is not an active plan, Della Valle said.

“Our opportunity is more build-to-suit,” said Della Valle, noting that the building can support floor plates as large as 48,000 square feet at its base.

Della Valle is working informally on plans for the project with large office owner Boston Properties. The two are each looking for a large tenant for the site, which Alloy could develop by itself or in partnership with Boston Properties, Della Valle said. Boston Properties did not respond to requests for comment.

But Della Valle said he is also entertaining other possibilities, such as selling the site, or leasing it on a long-term basis to another owner or developer.

A leasing team hasn’t yet been hired, although he said Alloy is keeping the brokerage industry “up to date” on the project.

447 10th Avenue

Developer: Sherwood Equities

Size: 2.5 million square feet

Expected completion date: TBD

Leasing agent: None

Midtown-based Sherwood Equities, headed by CEO Jeffrey Katz, owns three parcels in the Hudson Yards area. But much like Alloy, it is less well-known than most of the other Far West Side developers.

Sherwood is planning an office tower at 447 10th Avenue at 34th Street on a site it’s owned since 1986. (Sherwood’s two smaller sites in the district will likely become residential or mixed-use towers.)

But the firm is in no hurry to start construction on the massive office project, Nelson said, and Sherwood is not competing as fiercely for tenants as some of the other developers in the area.

“We are not being as aggressive as the others,” Nelson said. With rents in the untested neighborhood still relatively low, the firm feels that “it does not make sense to fight tooth and nail.”

He said he expects rents in the area to rise dramatically once tenants start moving in to other new buildings.

Sherwood is nonetheless on the lookout for tenants in need of large chunks of space. Sources said the firm responded to an inquiry from Time Warner about potentially taking space at 447 10th.

Nelson declined to comment on Time Warner specifically, but confirmed that Sherwood would indeed respond “if a tenant came along that needed 2 million square feet.”
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Old May 1st, 2013, 08:34 PM   #2505
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Quote:
Originally Posted by the man from k-town View Post
some news on ny curbed

http://ny.curbed.com/places/hudson-yards#active

ACTIVE DISCUSSIONS / NEWEST POSTS
Budget Woes

hy-ralph-lauren-010813.jpgIf you've been paying attention to the last decade of NYC development, you're aware that Hudson Yards has moved a helluva lot slower than anticipated. As such, the west side megaproject has been something of a money-suck for the city—it was supposed to start paying for itself by 2008. It's 2013 and only one office tower is rising. Hudson Yards was supposed to generate $283 million in 2012, and it only created $170 million. Plus, the city has been funneling hundreds of millions of dollars into the project. Now, budget officials want the Midtown East rezoning to be delayed so Hudson Yards, where planned towers are struggling to find commercial tenants, doesn't see even more competition. [WSJ; previously]
I think it is too early to rush into any judgments with this project when we are in its early phases because nothing is built yet. Like all projects patience is needed. The city has made a huge INVESTMENT upgrading the infrastructure in this part of Manhattan that seriously needs an injection of life. Right now the far West Side is pretty desolate. The city will recoup its losses within 10-15 years down the road when signs of life can finally start here. Lol. The city may not see the $$ it wants now but it will make a ton in the future from it. That is for sure. It’s Manhattan.

When you invest, you don’t expect instant returns. It takes time to recoup your investment and it’s the same way with the Hudson Yards Project especially in this magnitude.

Comparing the Hudson Yards vs Midtown East is like comparing apples to oranges. We are basically creating a new city within a city unlike the Midtown East the infrastructure is already there. Midtown East is world class and demands the most per sq ft in the city/ world. My point being Midtown is Existing vs. Hudson Yards is Creating, which means Midtown would require less of an investment from the city for upgrading its infrastructure there and obviously should make back its investment more quickly than a much larger project of the Hudson Yards.
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Old May 2nd, 2013, 03:02 AM   #2506
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Here are some of my construction pics from last night.

[IMG]image hosted on flickr
Hudson Yards by towerpower123, on Flickr[/IMG]

[IMG]image hosted on flickr
Hudson Yards by towerpower123, on Flickr[/IMG]

[IMG]image hosted on flickr
Hudson Yards Coach Tower by towerpower123, on Flickr[/IMG]

[IMG]image hosted on flickr
Hudson Yards Coach Tower by towerpower123, on Flickr[/IMG]

[IMG]image hosted on flickr
Hudson Yards Coach Tower by towerpower123, on Flickr[/IMG]

Excavation has started, down about 15 feet so far. As you can see, the Corset Tower site is covered by dirt piles.
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See my DeviantArt account at http://towerpower123.deviantart.com/
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Old May 3rd, 2013, 08:37 PM   #2507
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Will Hudson Yards Be a Neighborhood?

As a new exhibition at New York's Center for Architecture explores the 26-acre development, RECORD spoke with Bill Pedersen, whose firm Kohn Pedersen Fox is responsible for its master plan.

http://archrecord.construction.com/n...ighborhood.asp

Quote:
No one likes the hole in the west side of Manhattan—the black accordion of train tracks between 30th and 33rd Streets, west of 10th Avenue. But the 26-acre property has confounded developers for decades, mostly because the expense of building a platform over the railyards means that only a cluster of very tall buildings, with very large floorplates, can provide the kind of return investors hope for. But in December the Related Companies, headed by Stephen M. Ross, broke ground on the eastern half of the Hudson Yards development, one of the largest construction project in New York City history, with nearly 13 million square feet of office, residential, and retail space. Ross hopes Hudson Yards will compete, on a global scale, with financial districts like Shanghai’s Pudong and London’s Canary Wharf. But that begs the question: Will it become a windswept no-man’s-land of mega-buildings, or—as its designers hope—a new Manhattan neighborhood worth hanging out in?

The answer will depend in part on the work of Manhattan architect Bill Pedersen, whose firm, Kohn Pedersen Fox (KPF), is master-planning the entire Hudson Yards development (as well as designing several of its largest buildings). Pedersen says he has focused his attention on the High Line, the elevated park that has transformed the lower west side of Manhattan and, when its third phase is completed, will loop around the Hudson Yards site. Tearing down that portion of the High Line, which is something real estate developers once vowed to do, is now out of the question, according to Pedersen. In fact, the first building to be built at Hudson Yards will overhang the High Line, bringing the park and a skyscraper together in what the architect hopes will be a comfortable alliance. From there, the High Line will run alongside the Culture Shed, a vast telescoping gallery and performance space, and the Culture Tower, a condo building with a distinctive four-leaf clover shape, both designed by Diller Scofidio + Renfro with Rockwell Group. Then it turns north to meet another skyscraper, this one by David Childs of Skidmore, Owings and Merrill. Much of the development is still being designed; meanwhile an exhibition and related programs at the Center for Architecture in New York, Design in the Heart of New York (through June 30), is taking a close look at how Hudson Yards will impact the city.

In his office overlooking Bryant Park, Pedersen showed RECORD the latest plans for Hudson Yards.

Will Hudson Yards feel like a real Manhattan neighborhood?

The degree to which it connects and links into the city has been our total preoccupation. We want these buildings to reflect New York and not Hong Kong or Shanghai. And for that to happen, they have to respond to specific local conditions. Luckily, we have the High Line. If this were happening without the High Line, if we were stranded on the West Side of Manhattan, it would be unaccomplishable.

How does the first building, the 895-foot tower at the northwest corner of 30th Street and 10th Avenue, respond to local conditions?

It started out as a spec office building. When Coach came in, as lead tenant, we were given more direction. Coach was founded two blocks away, and they consider this to be their native soil. They had input on both the materials and the configuration of the building. There’s a unique wall type—shingled glass—that is specific to this building. [Coach CEO] Reed Krakoff immediately took to that idea—he felt the shingling was very American. They also wanted a campus. We responded by pulling a piece of the tower out from the building’s mass, and forming an atrium, which looks directly south down the axis of the High Line, and becomes the High Line’s northern terminus. Meanwhile, the lobby portion of the building establishes a scale relationship with the Culture Shed. They’re gesturing to each other across the square.

Have you been working with the architects of the Culture Shed and Culture Tower?

We’re in close communication. We collaborated with Diller Scofidio + Renfro in turning the Culture Shed 90 degrees from its original orientation, so that as you approach Hudson Yards from the south, you get the elegance of its profile and it becomes a gateway to the central plaza.

What will the central plaza be like?

In Columbus Circle [where Steve Ross developed the Time Warner Center] there was already a center of gravity. Here everything depends on what he puts in the plaza. This is his legacy. So he is looking all over the world for the best artists. The idea is to create pieces of a significant scale, to mediate between the size of the buildings and the size of the individual.

What is the impact of having the railyards below?

We have tremendous vent requirements. The vents have to be high, at least 30 feet. And there are nine of them. But they offer points of departure, through sculptural or landscape interventions.

What does this project mean to you and KPF?

It’s fair to say that for the 38 years that we’ve been practicing, and doing many large commercial towers, we’ve been working to make that building type a better participant in the city. And this is the final exam.
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Old May 3rd, 2013, 10:01 PM   #2508
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these will be instant icons
http://www.youtube.com/watch?feature...&v=zqGSLpk-5Wo

[IMG]http://oi41.************/3091tsx.jpg[/IMG]

[IMG]http://oi40.************/eu0m1h.jpg[/IMG]

[IMG]http://oi39.************/s4p3sz.jpg[/IMG]
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Old May 3rd, 2013, 11:32 PM   #2509
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That's an older design. The current design is far better with the tops pointing inwards
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Old May 4th, 2013, 12:17 AM   #2510
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I got a little carried away drilling into the reasons behind this on the SSP North Tower thread, but I much preferred the older design with the tips pointed away from one another.

I'm curious to know how many of you preferred the the older design ("the scissors") and how many of you prefers the new ("the pincers")?
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Old May 4th, 2013, 01:07 AM   #2511
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I got a little carried away drilling into the reasons behind this on the SSP North Tower thread, but I much preferred the older design with the tips pointed away from one another.

I'm curious to know how many of you preferred the the older design ("the scissors") and how many of you prefers the new ("the pincers")?
Definitely the scissors. Looked like they were exploding outward with focus on square in the center of the towers. The leaning effect was more pronounced and having the straight edges going all the way to the top made the towers look taller. I have no idea why they switched. Imagine 2wtc's roof slanting away from the center of the complex.
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Old May 4th, 2013, 01:13 AM   #2512
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I like the leaning better that way i don't have to go all the way to Italy and see the leaning towers of pisa.
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Old May 4th, 2013, 01:21 AM   #2513
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A new iconic place in NY is being born, so exciting!
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Old May 4th, 2013, 02:28 AM   #2514
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Definitely the scissors. Looked like they were exploding outward with focus on square in the center of the towers. The leaning effect was more pronounced and having the straight edges going all the way to the top made the towers look taller. I have no idea why they switched. Imagine 2wtc's roof slanting away from the center of the complex.
I agree with the scissor. But 2WTC is slanting away from the center right?
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Old May 4th, 2013, 03:07 AM   #2515
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I agree with the scissor. But 2WTC is slanting away from the center right?
No the lower part is near center drawing your eye to memorial. I really hope someone who knows something about design can explain why they thought slanting away would be better.
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Old May 4th, 2013, 05:24 AM   #2516
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I agree with the scissor. But 2WTC is slanting away from the center right?
No, it slopes directly down to the memorial.

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Old May 4th, 2013, 07:04 AM   #2517
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Only project I can think of off the top of my head that is comparable with this is Barangaroo in Sydney (Done a bit of research - thought of moving there. Just got back from visiting Sydney). I think that this project has convinced me to stay in NYC. Love it... Although Sydney is making a big move... New York is home, anyone know how much bigger this is than Londons canary wharf?
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Old May 4th, 2013, 07:36 AM   #2518
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Only project I can think of off the top of my head that is comparable with this is Barangaroo in Sydney (Done a bit of research - thought of moving there. Just got back from visiting Sydney). I think that this project has convinced me to stay in NYC. Love it... Although Sydney is making a big move... New York is home, anyone know how much bigger this is than Londons canary wharf?
Quoted from the NYC Dept of City planning - "There is one last frontier available in Manhattan - Hudson Yards, the underutilized area bounded roughly by West 42nd Street and West 30th Street, Eighth Avenue to the Hudson River. It is in these 360 acres that the City can meet its public responsibility to continue to provide job and housing opportunities for all New Yorkers."

Canary Wharf is 97 acres according to this article but they are expanding to double the size so it would eventually be aprox. 200 acres.
http://www.independent.co.uk/news/bu...f-2359403.html

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Old May 4th, 2013, 07:58 AM   #2519
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Good on London! They need the expansion of Canary Wharf, good on them. I love this Hudson Yards development. And I love the Barangaroo development in Sydney. Both are massive. While I was there it felt a lot like home, big city, busy, fast paced life. Although what I liked about it was when I found my way out of the big city, there were crystal beaches with surfers, cafes and vibrancy.. It's a lot like New York, just has beaches... I'm sure Tokyo has some big projects going up... It sounds like a nice battle to watch. Battle of the Global Cities - New York vs London vs Sydney vs Tokyo. Paris doesn't seem fast paced and Shanghai seems more like a place these cities use for money...
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Old May 4th, 2013, 07:59 AM   #2520
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360 acres?! Holy hell man, that's huge. New York hey.
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