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Old October 23rd, 2012, 02:43 AM   #1501
nyarch21
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Originally Posted by 1Filipe1

i disagree, i think downtown's skyline with the completed wtc will be amazing, yes midtown will be amazing as well, but for me i always liked downtown more, i think downtown would look kinda of bad with other buildings taller then the wtc unless it had a really good design that would fit in with it all.
I agree. The World Trade Center towers IMO complement downtown so perfectly, that any other building in downtown has to do the same in order to keep downtown great. Midtown I love, but I feel like there are a whole lot more eyesores.
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Old October 23rd, 2012, 03:11 AM   #1502
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Thos article in today's WSJ states that L'Oreal has agreed to lease 400k sf for its US HQ in the Coach Tower, and SAP will else 100k sf. If true, 1.25m of the CoachTower's 1.8m sf will be leased.

http://professional.wsj.com/article/...&mg=reno64-wsj



U.S. NEWSUpdated October 22, 2012, 8:11 p.m. ET Manhattan Megaproject Set to Rise .

By ELIOT BROWN

NEW YORK—Construction is set to begin on the first stage of a $15 billion city-within-a-city that aims to reshape Manhattan's desolate far West Side, kicking off the largest privately funded office development in the U.S. since the economic downturn.

New York developer Related Cos. has assembled a new group of financial backers and said it plans to break ground in November on the initial 46-story office tower of the 26-acre Hudson Yards project, a sign that the dormant market for U.S. commercial development is showing early signs of life.

"This will be the Rockefeller Center—the heart of the city—for the 21st century," said Stephen Ross, Related's chairman. "We are going to build a truly world-class site."


Visualhouse/Related Companies

An artist's rendering of the project. Construction on the first stage of the long-planned development will begin next month.
Commercial construction has been slowed by a lack of financing but that market gradually is returning. McGraw-Hill Construction, which analyzes construction data, estimates that building will commence on 272 million square feet of office, retail, hotel and warehouse space in the U.S. this year, more than in any year since 2008. Still, new construction remains slow by historic standards and tends to be limited to a few major cities.

Lenders including Bank of America Corp. BAC +1.17%have tentatively committed to finance a construction loan of roughly $400 million for the initial 1.7-million-square-foot tower at the Hudson Yards site, according to real-estate executives briefed on the plans.

In addition, a Middle Eastern sovereign-wealth fund agreed to invest with Related and its Canadian pension plan-backed partner, Oxford Properties Group, on the $1.2 billion building, the executives said.

Hudson Yards, which has been on the boards of planners since at least the 1980s, would create a business and residential district a mile from Midtown Manhattan, on the city's far West Side. The area now is home to rail yards for commuter trains serving Long Island. After the initial office tower, the Hudson Yards plan calls for constructing two giant platforms over the yards, each at a cost of roughly $800 million,, on top of which the buildings would be erected, because space in Manhattan is at such a premium.

Related won the rights to develop on the rail yards from the state-run Metropolitan Transportation Authority in 2008, only to be stalled by the economic downturn.

The project became a signature initiative of New York Mayor Michael Bloomberg, who once envisioned the site as the center of New York's bid for the 2012 Olympics. Progress has been spurred in part by the extension of a subway to the area at a cost of more than $2 billion, set to open to riders in mid-2014.



Related is trying to finalize deals with its partners by year-end. The talks are far enough advanced, according to Related and others involved in the project, that the company feels comfortable starting on the first building, which it hopes to finish by 2015.

For future phases, the costs grow and the schedule may again be thrown off by the economy. Related needs to build an $800 million platform over half the rail yards for the second phase, and another platform for the third phase. Related would start the second phase if it secures a large tenant. Mr. Ross said the company is "far along" in talks with such companies. Last year, the developer struck a deal with handbag maker Coach Inc. COH -3.27%to take office space in more than one-third of the first tower. Still, it was unclear at the time whether Related would be able to start work as planned, given that since the downturn, construction lending has been slow for all building except rental apartments.

Since then, Related and its advisers at CBRE Group Inc. CBG +1.62%have attracted more tenants. This month, the chairman of cosmetics company L'Oréal OR.FR -1.64%l SA gave his blessing to a plan to move the company's Manhattan offices to the tower, said executives familiar with the decision. L'Oréal is negotiating with Related for a lease for more than 400,000 square feet. German software giant SAP AG SAP.XE -2.22%is in talks to take more than 100,000 square feet, those executives said. Representatives of both companies declined to comment.

Write to Eliot Brown at [email protected]


More good news for this area.



http://observer.com/2012/10/dan-doct...nnyside-yards/

Dan Doctoroff Still Has Big Plans―Like Moving the Javits to Sunnyside Yards
0 / 11
NEXT By Matt Chaban 10/22 5:38pm

It has been five years since Dan Doctoroff reported to City Hall for work, but the former deputy mayor and current CEO of Bloomberg LP still finds time to think up interesting, even outrageous visions for the city. Well, they would be crazy if they did not have a habit of getting built. After all, so many developments that came out of Mr. Doctoroff’s unsuccessful bid to draw the Olympics to the five boroughs have since been realized regardless, from Atlantic Yards to Hudson Yards to Hunters Point South, the No. 7 extension, water taxis—the list goes on and on.

These success suggest that even though Mr. Doctoroff is no longer in command, might it still be possible to see a gondola stretch across the East River between Lower Manhattan, Governors Island and Brooklyn? Or a light rail line running the entire length of the waterfront from Astoria in Queens to Brooklyn’s Red Hook? Or, most audacious of all, tearing down the Javits convention center and moving it to yet another decked-over rail yard, this time in Sunnyside, where it would be surrounded by apartment and hotel towers and a sizable retail complex?

These were among the proposals Mr. Doctoroff put forward on Friday during a speech at the Municipal Art Society’s MAS Summit 2012. They were meant as examples for the next mayor to latch onto in order to “extend the achievements of the Bloomberg Administration by knitting new connections among emerging communities, amenities and institutions.”

Among the 90 speakers—including quite a few probable mayoral candidates—at last week’s cities conference, Mr. Doctoroff was asked to address what New York would need to do in order to succeed in the coming century. He decided to build his speech around the importance of the mayor and the priorities he believes any mayor (but especially those looking to succeed his boss) should have.

“I decided to frame it in terms of leadership because I have watched Mike Bloomberg over the past 11 years be a great leader and I do believe that mayors (for better and worse) truly make the biggest difference in the fate of the city,” Mr. Doctoroff wrote in a follow-up email. “I also believe that we can lose what we have gained quite quickly, as we saw in the 1970s.”

Mr. Doctoroff said he had three central questions that New Yorkers should ask of their would be mayors:
•“Does he or she truly understand what makes New York unique in an increasingly competitive world?”
•“Does he or she fervently believe in what I call the ‘virtuous cycle of the successful city?’”
•“Does he or she have the vision to fuel the imagination of this stunning city and then the courage and decisiveness to get things done?”

Of course Mr. Doctoroff himself had an answer, often lengthy, to each of these questions. To the first one, of uniqueness and global competition, he stressed that the city should not pine for the past, for legacy industries like manufacturing, for outdated ways of thinking, building and taxing. “If we begin to send signals, any signals, that we are not going to remain the most open city in the world, we will surely lose our edge,” Mr. Doctoroff said.

Mr. Doctoroff explained his “virtuous cycle” thusly: “We are a remarkably compassionate city. We believe that we need to help those in need, that we have to make the city more affordable, that we have to provide the tools for people to capitalize on opportunity. All of that requires money. That’s why our leaders have to have to truly get―and then they have to effectively manage―the virtuous cycle.”

He then, only half in jest, copped what sounded like a line from Gordon Gecko. “It starts with the core belief that growth―growth―is good,” Mr. Doctoroff said. “That the additional resident, business, or visitor generates net new revenues, which, if invested wisely, enhances the quality of life, which, in turn, helps to attract more residents, businesses and visitors, thereby perpetuating the cycle.”

Over the past 10 years, we have rebuilt, rezoned, and refashioned huge swaths of the city,” he declared proudly. “Rail yards are becoming New York’s next great neighborhoods. A rail line has become New York’s newest great park. A military base will become New York’s next great park. We have reclaimed our formerly decrepit waterfront for housing and recreation. Roosevelt Island will become the intellectual center of a burgeoning tech industry. We are not a city that plays small ball.”

In his email, Mr. Doctoroff explained the ideas, some new, some old, some variations on the old, were all designed to connect the progress that had come before. The gondolas would provide more reliable access to Governors Island, allowing it to become a 24/7 community, one that Mr. Doctoroff suggested would become “a hub for another emerging industry, like global health.” As for the light rail line, it would run along Kent Avenue and Vernon Boulevard, among other generally quiet waterfront thoroughfares. “Brooklyn is hot,” Mr. Doctoroff intoned. “It is Queens’ turn next.”

But the clincher was Sunnyside, demonstrating the kind of big-picture, nothing-is-impossible thinking that characterized Mr. Doctoroff’s tenure at City Hall. He called it “a huge swath or rail yards,” repeating the phrase three times, to laughter from audience, before pointing out that it “forms a scar through the middle of Queens.” Indeed, this project, bigger than Hudson, Atlantic and the Hoboken PATH yards combined, reminded people all too well of the Doctoroff days.

Proposals for such a project have been in the works for four decades, but Mr. Doctoroff brought some new innovations to the table. For starters, he believes the time is finally right to justify the massive investment such a project would entail. The starting point would be dividing the plan up into parcels, so the entire yards would not have to be decked at once but could instead be done progressively. And the timing for that first parcel could not be better, Mr. Doctoroff suggested.

“Let’s borrow an idea from Governor Cuomo and move Javits to Queens, this time, though, to a location that is one or two subway stops from Midtown,” Mr. Doctoroff explained. “You could pay for a big part of it by selling Javits’ land on the West Side, which is more valuable today because of the No. 7 extension, and we could draw a wider array of conventions to less expensive hotels in Long Island City are built.”

He pointed out that while some might complain that the location is not Manhattan, it is close enough and has its clear advantages, including space and affordablility, an approach that Mr. Doctoroff said he witnessed this summer at the London Olympics, where a new convention center had been built in a formerly industrial part of the East End.

The final slide of the presentation, a joke, Mr. Doctoroff later insisted, was the one missing piece from his legacy realized at Sunnyside Yards. “You know, it could even be the site for a temporary Olympic Stadium,” he said, to more laughs, “but I leave that to future visionaries.”

The whole affair left us feeling dizzy. Many in the city, particularly in the business class, have been hungering for a candidate who could be the successor to Mike Bloomberg. Could this be the one? The rhetoric was certainly there, as Mr. Doctoroff’s final words on stage made clear.

“Big visions like this are what have defined New York,” he said. “But they don’t happen by accident. They take guts and imagination. They require an intuitive understanding of what are New York’s unique advantages in a competitive world. They demand the skill to generate the revenues so we can afford to be the kind of city we aspire to be.”

Now who could have those qualities? Perhaps Dan Doctoroff?

“Just to be clear, I have zero interest in running for Mayor, so, if the premise of the story is that I am somehow putting myself out there, then I don’t want to engage,” Mr. Doctoroff said in response to the first email The Observer sent him asking him as much. “If it is about what I said on Friday, then I am happy to talk.”

In a follow-up email, he explained that he gave the speech because he was asked, though he also admitted to constantly be thinking up new and far-out plans for the city.

“I visit all of the leading cities of the world on a regular basis, so it is hard to avoid what they are doing and I have always been fascinated with cities anyway,” Mr. Doctoroff explained. “That said, I am quite focused on Bloomberg, so it is probably best to characterize my thoughts as musings.”

For better or worse, bigger or badder, the city could use more of these kinds of musings.

This growth, this net new revenue, naturally leads to the visions Mr. Doctoroff was so famous for cooking up, and where he outlined the plans previously mentioned.

Last edited by RobertWalpole; October 23rd, 2012 at 05:46 AM.
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Old October 23rd, 2012, 03:27 PM   #1503
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Am I the only one who thinks mega talls would look out of place in NYC?
New York is probably one of the few places on earth where a megatall actually wouldn't look out of place. The sheer mass of skyscrapers in NY is just overwhelming. And with the current boom, NY is likely going to have 15 - 20 supertalls by 2020, 5 of them exceeding 400m (1WTC, 2WTC, HY North, 432 Park and 225 W 57th St)! So yeah, a megatall would be quite perfect.
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Old October 23rd, 2012, 03:57 PM   #1504
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Originally Posted by hunser View Post
New York is probably one of the few places on earth where a megatall actually wouldn't look out of place. The sheer mass of skyscrapers in NY is just overwhelming. And with the current boom, NY is likely going to have 15 - 20 supertalls by 2020, 5 of them exceeding 400m (1WTC, 2WTC, HY North, 432 Park and 225 W 57th St)! So yeah, a megatall would be quite perfect.
I agree, it's a matter of time before we see 500m/600m real proposals. I really think once the above mentioned have been completed we will already be hearing about the next biggest. No longer is NYC stuck in the 300 and less range as we are seeing with the changes in midtown and the HY's
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Old October 23rd, 2012, 04:07 PM   #1505
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Am I the only one who thinks mega talls would look out of place in NYC?
Nope, i agree with you.
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Old October 23rd, 2012, 04:08 PM   #1506
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A megatall would fit fantastic in a Midtown with several 300m+ and 400m+ towers build before.
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Old October 23rd, 2012, 04:08 PM   #1507
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Look at all that space.. I really can't wait for this to rise. 6m per floor is a lot by the way, waste of space?
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Old October 23rd, 2012, 05:50 PM   #1508
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Look at all that space.. I really can't wait for this to rise. 6m per floor is a lot by the way, waste of space?
of course habitable floors do not occupy the entire height of the building.
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Old October 23rd, 2012, 06:04 PM   #1509
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Buildings permits have been filed for the Coach Tower.
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Old October 23rd, 2012, 06:34 PM   #1510
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Related Seeks Lease Changes At Hudson Yards: MTA

Quote:
As Related’s Hudson Yards project closes in on a second major office lease for its planned first tower, MTA chairman Joseph Lhota told the New York Post that the developer is attempting to amend its unsigned 99-year-lease.

Although officials at Related deny asking for any changes, Lhota said: “Yes, Related has approached the MTA to amend the existing deal. I am willing to entertain it so long as the MTA’s interests are fully protected. Any amendment would require approval by the MTA board.”

Lhota isn’t saying what kinds of changes Related is asking for at the 26-acre site, but, according to the Post, it’s is possible that the issue involves luxury bag maker Coach, which will set up its headquarters at 501 West 30th Street when the building is complete in 2015.

Rumors are circulating that Related founder Stephen Ross wants to “sever” construction of the Coach tower from Related’s other obligations at the railyards site. For instance, ending its obligation to pay rent on all 26 acres within three years of the Coach ground-breaking, according to the Post. However, neither party is willing to comment on the matter.

Ground was supposed to be broken on the initial tower in the coming weeks, but construction cannot start until the lease is officially signed and new negotiations with the MTA could delay development.
----


Hudson Yards Gets Financing



Quote:
Next month will begin a new era of construction in Manhattan. Related Companies plans to break ground on the first tower of Hudson Yards, having secured a group of financial backers. The Journal reports that Bank of America "tentatively committed" to financing a $400 million loan for the 46-story building, and "a Middle East wealth fund" is also investing with Related. The loan is just a drop in the bucket for the $6 billion first phase, but Related's talks with partners are "far enough advanced," and should be finalized by year's end, that the developer feels comfortable starting construction. This may be a clear sign that the U.S. commercial development market is coming back to life, as Hudson Yards is the largest privately funded office project in the nation since the 2008 downturn.
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Old October 23rd, 2012, 10:15 PM   #1511
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the interesting thing about these towers is that they will look different from any angle



Quote:
The towers’ skyline presence is dynamic, offering varying experiences depending on the viewing location and creating a dynamic presence on the New York cityscape.


renderings from Kohn Pedersen Fox Associates (KPF)
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Old October 25th, 2012, 01:16 AM   #1512
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Simply amazing.
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Old October 25th, 2012, 02:27 AM   #1513
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the interesting thing about these towers is that they will look different from any angle
I can see that the south tower looks dwarfed here
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Old October 25th, 2012, 03:01 AM   #1514
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I wonder what this is. It doesn't appear to be the north or south tower.

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Old October 25th, 2012, 03:11 AM   #1515
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Related has revised its online brochure for the Hudson Yards. As per the brochure, the Coach Tower will be 46 stories and 876 feet tall. The North Tower will be 67 floors and 1,337 feet tall. What's not clear is whether the height figures reflect the highest point on the roof or the highest occupied floor. The diagrams on the brochure depict at least another hundred feet for each tower above floors 46 and 67, respectively. We'll see.

As per the latest renderings, the boomerang observatory is gone, but the North Tower still has an indoor observatory near the top of the tower.

Last edited by RobertWalpole; October 25th, 2012 at 03:45 AM.
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Old October 25th, 2012, 04:04 AM   #1516
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It's the Coach Tower

[IMG]http://oi45.************/2ut17q9.jpg[/IMG]
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Old October 25th, 2012, 04:14 AM   #1517
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from the brochure http://www.related.com/HudsonYards/i...20Brochure.pdf

[IMG]http://oi50.************/2ng6gd2.jpg[/IMG]

[IMG]http://oi45.************/23qyu5h.jpg[/IMG]

[IMG]http://oi49.************/2e2nf2a.jpg[/IMG]

[IMG]http://oi46.************/m8fubm.jpg[/IMG]


the bottom pics are clearly older renderings, but going by this, the mixed use tower is taller than the coach tower was before it's height reduction

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Old October 25th, 2012, 04:41 AM   #1518
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Awesome!!
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Old October 25th, 2012, 04:58 AM   #1519
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great north tower 1337 feet tall
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Old October 25th, 2012, 05:17 AM   #1520
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from the brochure
Hudson, Can you copy the schematics in he brochure which depict the height and floors?

They're on pages 8 and 9. I can't copy them for some reason.

Last edited by desertpunk; October 25th, 2012 at 08:35 PM.
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