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Old September 3rd, 2011, 08:40 PM   #101
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A city of smokestacks, toxins and, for many, home
Updated: 2011-09-02 07:58
By Wu Wencong (China Daily)

The taxi is running on a two-lane road at 9 pm in Ganjingzi, the "poorest district in Dalian," the drivers said. On one side of the road stands the China National Petroleum Corp (CNPC) Dalian plant. Opposite the plant gate is the residential area for workers and their families.

It is so quiet, even peaceful, that to an outsider it seems as if the fire that broke out a few hours ago in a 5,000-cubic-meter oil tank did not happen at all.

That was the fifth major incident at the plant in 14 months. After all the fires, explosion and leakage, I am expecting a city filled with anger and dissatisfaction.

But the first resident I speak to, the taxi driver, didn't even know about that day's fire. And the first comment I get about it is, "It's really not a big deal," from a truck driver who lives close to the plant.

Some residents mention a peculiar smell at night every now and then, but they try to comfort me when I worry about their safety. "Take it easy! Nothing big is going to happen here."

'No big deal'

Driving along the road outside the plant about 10 the next morning, our taxi reaches a small bay called Crab Gulf. A few people are swimming in water that appears dark yellow near the shore. Dozens of meters inland stand a few oil tanks and smokestacks, and many more tall facilities owned by the plant.

A man who has just gotten out of the water tells me he comes here to swim five months a year. Mr. Hao is 48 years old. His wife works at the CNPC Dalian plant, as her parents did some 20 years ago.

He says he has seen more than 100 people swimming in the gulf at one time.

"The water is surely polluted, but it's close to us, and I won't drink it anyway," he says, drying himself with a towel. "Actually, the water is pretty clear in good weather, with the right wind direction, of course."

Having lived near the plant for 20 years, he talks about the hidden danger as if it doesn't matter. "It's just a couple of fires and no big deal. The PX (paraxylene) project in the open economic zone is the dangerous one, because of its toxicity."

He also says moving away is not an option. "It's not a matter of money. We are used to living here."

'You can't ask'

Dalian's Jinzhou open economic zone lies northeast of the CNPC plant. Along the 30-km coastline road that links the two large-scale petrochemical areas are all kinds of high-end communities, in tall buildings or villas, and even a golf course.

As our car passes the greenbelts and the paved path along the shore, I have an illusion that I am in another city. Smart villas and large industrial chimneys just don't go together.

At the end of the road is the Dagushan petrochemical industrial park, where the PX chemical plant and Dalian Xingang port oil depot are situated.

The scale of the depot is not public information, but from the road, more than 100 oil tanks are visible, with capacities of 50,000 or 100,000 cubic meters. The highest serial number I see on a tank is 403.

A few kilometers away is the PX chemical plant, which the local government demanded be closed about two weeks ago.

Seen from the plant gate, it is hard to tell whether production is stopped. Two coaches that carry employees to work are standing outside the fence, and workers in blue uniforms are walking inside the plant.

I ask the gatekeeper whether production has been halted. But all I get is, "I'm sorry, you can't ask that," and a steady, scanning gaze.
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Old November 4th, 2011, 03:50 PM   #102
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Rescuers are seen at a construction site where a cave-in occurred in Lushun, a district of Dalian, northeast China's Liaoning Province, Oct. 8, 2011. The cave-in took place at about 1:59 p.m., when several workers were constructing an underground parking lot here.By far, at least nine people have been confirmed dead in the accident. (Xinhua/Cai Yongjun)
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Old November 17th, 2011, 07:10 PM   #103
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Aedas designs new retail complex next to Dalian's Olympic Square

The Olympia 66 retail development is located at Wusi Lu in the Xigang District, one of the most prominent commercial avenues in Dalian. It occupies a site of 63,400 sq m with a total gross floor area of 221,900 sq m. The site is adjacent to the Olympic Square, which is one of a sequence of squares located on the main avenue of Zhongshan Lu. To the east is People's Square the home of the municipal government, and to the west is Xinghai Square.

The project brief calls for a response that is iconic in defining a city destination. The architects' vision was to create a contemporary statement with an oriental overtone. The concept references the twin carp, a typical symbol in Chinese New Year paintings, synonymous with wealth and abundance.

The interplay of two carps swimming inspired forms containing a dynamic loop circulation flowing through a continuous chain of retail and atrium activities and creating an exciting and diverse lifestyle experience.

The form enhances urban connectivity and integration through multiple entrances. Olympia 66 is totally permeable on the ground floor. Main entrances are prominently defined and open into generous event spaces, allowing a pause before joining the vortex of circulation. The sequenced nodes and spaces along the retail route provide opportunities to rest at a cafe or take in an exhibition. The sequence culminates with leisure and activities at the upper floors that lead to landscaped terraces. The terraces wrap around the building where users can either enjoy a coffee overlooking Olympic Square or walk up to the central roof garden.

The landscape is conceived as mounds and pools reflecting China's natural topography. The landscape mounds resemble a shoal of fish forming vistas to Olympia 66 with pocket parks, restaurants and a significant space for activities or festive celebration. The ‘fish' flow down from Zhongshan Lu across the park and through the building uniting the different sites and defining both exciting and usable spaces.

The offset curving arcs of internal circulation resemble the body of the dancing carp. The body is expressed as a series of simple shells with the tail flowing over the curving central spine. The shells on the roof are layered to create clear story glazing, allowing direct light and reflected light into the two atrium spaces. The largely solid insulated roof prevents heat loss in winter and solar gain in summer, creating a simple environmental solution that is responsive to the northern Chinese climate. The additional energy efficient building services plus the integration of photovoltaic panels will deliver a LEED gold rating for the development.





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Old February 6th, 2012, 02:04 PM   #104
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Fire at subway construction site in NE China, no casualties reported

DALIAN, Jan. 19 (Xinhua) -- Flames engulfed a prefabricated house at a subway construction site Thursday afternoon in Dalian, a port city in northeast China's Liaoning province, according to local authorities.

A preliminary investigation showed that a jar of liquefied petroleum gas exploded around 2 p.m., igniting the house, a spokesman with the city's fire department said.

Witnesses said the flames reached a height of at least 10 meters, destroying two-thirds of the house before firefighters could arrive at the scene.

The fire was put out by 5 p.m. with no initial reports of casualties.

The two-story house served as a dormitory for construction workers at a subway construction site on Xi'an Road in downtown Dalian.

The construction site is part of one of five subway lines set to open by the end of this year.
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Old February 12th, 2012, 01:51 PM   #105
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From www.archdaily.com

New Dalian Municipal Library

For more information, please click on link below:

http://www.archdaily.com/206711/dali...ary-10-design/













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I love Beijing TiananMen, Rising Sun upon it.
I love Beijing ChaoyangMen, Rising Skyscrapers beyond it!


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Old February 12th, 2012, 02:43 PM   #106
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China's first anchored suspension cross-sea bridge starts its offshore construction phase in Dalian, Liaoning province on Feb 8, 2012. The 5.3-kilometer long bridge is expected to be open to traffic at the end of 2013. [Photo / Xinhua]
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Old March 16th, 2012, 12:56 AM   #107
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Four interlocking rings offer dynamic vision for multi-use Aquatic Center









http://www.worldarchitecturenews.com...pload_id=19308
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Old March 16th, 2012, 10:59 AM   #108
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It looks a bit like the Danish pavillion at the Shanghai 2010 Expo.

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Old April 15th, 2012, 02:32 PM   #109
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Dalian International Conference Center by Austrian Architects Coop Himmelb(l)au

From www.archdaily.com










More Recent Photos from Flickr

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Dalian Convention Center (12 of 12).jpg by evan.chakroff, on Flickr

image hosted on flickr

Dalian Convention Center (11 of 12).jpg by evan.chakroff, on Flickr

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Dalian Convention Center (1 of 12).jpg by evan.chakroff, on Flickr
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我爱北京天安门,天安门上太阳升。
我爱北京朝阳门,朝阳门外高楼起!

I love Beijing TiananMen, Rising Sun upon it.
I love Beijing ChaoyangMen, Rising Skyscrapers beyond it!


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Old August 10th, 2012, 06:49 PM   #110
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Rendering posted on Xinhua's website :



No. 8 Dalian Green Space Center, China 1699.48 feet (about 517 meters) (Photo source: forum.home.news.cn)
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Old August 24th, 2012, 05:51 PM   #111
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A high-rise building under construction catches fire in the high-tech zone of Dalian City, northeast China's Liaoning Province, Aug. 23, 2012. A fire broke out at the high-rise building in Dalian on Thursday afternoon, with casualties not clear yet and the cause of the fire under investigation. (Xinhua)
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Old November 14th, 2012, 12:28 AM   #112
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NE China to set up two drone bases for marine surveillance

SHENYANG, Oct. 20 (Xinhua) -- Two drone bases will be established in northeast China's Liaoning Province for real time surveillance on coastal waters, local authorities said Saturday.

One of the bases will be built on a land reclamation lot in the coastal city of Yingkou to cover the Bohai Sea area. The other will be constructed in Dalian city to cover parts of the Yellow Sea within the province's jurisdiction, according to the oceanic and fishing department of the provincial government.

The drones will feature high-definition remote-sensing in marine surveillance, especially in quick response to emergency situations. They can also be used to identify illegal land reclamation activities and sand dredging, and monitor marine environments along the coast and on islets.

A previous report said China was planning to build 11 drone bases for marine surveillance along the country's coastline by 2015 and at least one drone would be stationed at each base.

According to the State Oceanic Administration, the use of pilotless aircraft in remote-sensing marine surveillance is relatively flexible, low-cost and efficient compared with the performance of satellite remote sensing, aerial remote sensing and field monitoring.
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Old January 26th, 2013, 09:05 AM   #113
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12.11.2012 18:01
En Route to the Bohai Tunnel
An idea to cut down on transport time along the Liaodong Peninsula in northeastern China is becoming a plan to build the world's longest undersea tunnel
By staff reporter Xu Chao
http://english.caixin.com/2012-12-11/100471310_1.html

(Beijing) -- While a long coastal drive can be counted as a leisurely pursuit for some, the 1,800 kilometers of roads around the bend of the Bohai Sea remains a hard slog for those in the business of land transport.

From the city of Penglai, Shandong Province, to Lushun, Liaoning Province, the shortest distance between the two cities is a mere 106 kilometers. But not taking the long way around won't be an option until an undersea tunnel is in place.

Inspired by the Eurotunnel linking Britain and France, Liu Xinhua, then a Yantai municipal government employee and currently vice president of Ludong University in Shandong, thought about how the Liaodong Peninsula could be connected to Shandong. In 1992, Liu and several other colleagues drafted a proposal to construct an undersea tunnel that would link Penglai and Lushun.

Were Liu's vision to become reality, the trip between the two places would be reduced from one day to one hour.

The project would be the largest infrastructure undertaking in China since the completion of the Three Gorges Dam, but many questions remain over whether such plans are feasible given costs and geological hazards.

Twenty years after Liu's initiative and long lasting debates, the construction of the Bohai Tunnel has been put back on the government agenda.

Wang Mengshu, head of the Bohai Strait Tunnel Strategic Planning and Research Team and an academic at the Chinese Academy of Engineering, said his team would submit a report to the State Council in 2013.

Pulling in to a Proposal

Transporting a cargo truck by ferry from Dalian to Yantai currently requires an overnight process. "Drive the truck to the ship, ferry over on the boat – drive over at night and arrive the next morning," said a worker at a freight company. The trip costs more than 5,000 yuan. Going over land following the coastline around the Bohai Sea reduces the cost but increases travel time.

Liu and his colleagues have lobbied for the Bohai Tunnel over the past two decades. A report they conducted argued that an underwater tunnel could reduce the driving distance from the northeast provinces to Shandong and the Yangtze River Delta by 1,000 to 400 kilometers. Connecting northeastern provinces down to the Yangtze River Delta and Pearl River Delta would provide a valuable economic and logistical link between China's comparatively less robust north, said the report.

In November 2006, the Yantai-Dalian railway ferry officially opened. This was China's first long distance railway ferry project, stretching over 100 kilometers. Many in the industry say that the train ferry represented an important link to the Bohai Tunnel infrastructure.

Since 2009, the National People's Congress representatives and Chinese People's Political Consultative Conference members from Liaoning and Shandong have submitted proposals for a Bohai Tunnel at the annual legislative meetings in Beijing.

In 2011, the State Council approved a Shandong Peninsula development plan. Under this plan, the Bohai Tunnel was first put on the government agenda.

Wang and other five scientists from the Chinese Academy of Engineering formed the Bohai Strait Tunnel Strategic Planning and Research Team this year to study the engineering feasibility of the project.

"The location for entrance and exit has been decided," said Wang, adding he is confident that the State Council will approve the undersea tunnel project.

Tunnel in the Sea

Policymakers have had to get past several construction proposals for the Bohai Tunnel. The debate began over whether the tunnel would be span the full length of the distance between the peninsulas, or comprise of a shorter tunnel connected to a bridge.

The shortened tunnel plan was put forward by Song Kezhi, the associate dean of the Ludong University School of Civil Engineering, in a 2011 paper which proposed the use of bridges between islands in the south and a tunnel for the northern leg of the journey.

In his paper, Song said construction costs would be lower if the plan were to include two types of structures: an undersea tunnel in deep water and bridges in shallow water.

But Wang said that in 2012, the full-length tunnel plan has garnered more support than the combination of a bridge and tunnel, and is expected to be adopted.

Behind the scuttling of Song's plan was resistance from local residents over building bridges on their islands. Song said people living on the islands in Changdao County worry that the building projects will damage the environment. Meanwhile, the small number of island inhabitants also reduced the efficiency of building bridges.

Wang explained that the full-length tunnel option would involve building a tunnel more than 100 meters under the sea between Lushun and Yantai. Railway tracks will be laid in the tunnel and vehicles can be transported by train through the tunnel.

If the full-length tunnel option is chosen, the future Bohai Tunnel will be twice as long as the Eurotunnel, making it the world's longest undersea tunnel.

A Possible Detour

Engineers working on the Bohai Tunnel say that in terms of difficulty and cost, the project may be second only to the Three Gorges Dam.

Several experts said that preliminary engineering investment in the full-length tunnel option could require up to 200 billion yuan. Wang said that with State Council approval, the building of the tunnel, from geological surveys to construction completion, should take six to 10 years.

For the Eurotunnel, geologists conducted extensive work prior to tunnel construction, with geological drilling work taking place between 1958 and 1987. There were 94 major drill holes.

Building undersea tunnels typically requires lengthy exploration work. Tunnels must run through soil and rock layers with varying levels of hardness. Geologists must first identify rock formations suitable for drilling tunnels, and this is much more difficult in deep water. At the same time, higher requirements for water permeability also add challenges for underwater rock layers compared to land tunnels.

Finding an ideal rock layer is the first step. Two earthquake fault zones – the Tanlu fault zone and the Zhangjiakou Penglai fault zone – pose another challenge.

Historically, calm has never persisted for long in the Bohai. In 1969, a 7.4 magnitude earthquake occurred in the Bohai Sea. In 1975, a 7.3 magnitude earthquake hit Haicheng in southern Liaoning Province, northeast of the Bohai.

Li Sangzhong, a professor of maritime geology at the Ocean University of China, said that the solution to minimizing the impact of earthquakes is to heighten the level of seismic fortification to "withstand at least a magnitude eight earthquake." But construction costs will rise correspondingly.

But Song said, "It's hard to say whether the earthquake fault zones will be a disruptive factor. We can't form a conclusion now."

Wang said that if a project is registered with the State Council, geological exploration during the early study stage will ultimately determine the project's feasibility.

On October 17, a CPPCC research team held a meeting on the Bohai Tunnel project with officials from the National Development and Reform Commission, Ministry of Environmental Protection and Ministry of Railways.

A participant from the research team who asked not to be named said that the ministries were inclined toward the full-length tunnel option as it would have the smallest environmental impact, adding that the project will require massive funding.

He was not optimistic on the construction of the Bohai Tunnel. "We'll have to wait at least a decade or two," he said.
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Old February 17th, 2013, 04:16 PM   #114
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NE China's first nuclear power plant starts operation


Photo taken on July 12, 2012 shows the Hongyanhe nuclear power station near Wafangdian, northeast China's Liaoning Province. The Hongyanhe nuclear power station, the first nuclear power plant and largest energy project in northeast China, started operation on Sunday afternoon.

DALIAN, Feb. 17 (Xinhua) -- The Hongyanhe nuclear power station, the first nuclear power plant and largest energy project in northeast China, started operation on Sunday afternoon.

The plant's first unit went into operation at 3:09 p.m., said Yang Xiaofeng, general manager of Liaoning Hongyanhe Nuclear Power Co., Ltd.

Construction on the first phase of the project, which features four power generation units to be built at a cost of 50 billion yuan (7.96 billion U.S. dollars), began in 2007 and is expected to be completed by the end of 2015, said Yang.

The four units will generate 30 billion kilowatt-hours (kwh) of electricity annually by then, accounting for 16 percent of the total electricity consumption in 2012 in Liaoning Province, Yang said.

Construction on the second phase of the project, which features two power generation units to be built with an investment of 25 billion yuan, started in May 2010 and is expected to be completed by the end of 2016, he said.

The power plant will generate 45 billion kwh of electricity after it is fully completed in 2016, he said.

The plant's construction is highly localized, with more than 80 percent of the parts and components it features being produced locally, Yang said.

It is also the first Chinese nuclear power plant to use seawater desalination technology to provide cooling water, he said.

The plant is located near the county-level city of Wafangdian, which is 110 km away from Dalian Port.
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Old April 27th, 2013, 08:44 PM   #115
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Dalian North Station

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62bd3fcbjw1e3xkus469hj210f625qv6b by ANR2008, on Flickr
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Old July 31st, 2013, 06:48 AM   #116
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Dalian International Conference Center Updates

By Austrian Architects Coop Himmelb(l)au


from archdaily.com
Quote:

Architects: Coop Himmelb(l)au
Location: Dalian, China
Design Principal: Wolf D. Prix
Project Partner: Paul Kath (until 2010), Wolfgang Reicht
Project Architect: Wolfgang Reicht
Design Architect: Alexander Ott
Design Team: Quirin Krumbholz, Eva Wolf, Victoria Coaloa
Area: 117,650 sqm
Year: 2012
Photographs: Duccio Malagamba
3 D Visualization: Isochrom.com, Vienna; Jens Mehlan & Jörg Hugo, Vienna Local Partners: DADRI Dalian Institute of Architecture Design and Research Co. LTD; UD Studio; J&A Interior Design
Structural Engineering: B+G Ingenieure, Bollinger Grohmann Schneider ZT GmbH, Vienna, Austria DADRI Dalian Institute of Architecture Design and Research Co. LTD, Dalian, P.R China
Acoustics: Müller-BBM, Planegg, Germany: Dr. Eckard Mommerz Stage Design: BSEDI Beijing Special Engineering Design and Research Institute, Beijing, P.R. China
Lighting Design: a•g Licht, Wilfried Kramb, Bonn, Germany
Audio & Video: CRFTG Radio, Film and Television Design & Research Institute, Beijing, P.R. China
Climatic Design: Prof. Brian Cody, Berlin, Germany Hvac, Sprinkler: Reinhold A. Bacher, Vienna, Austria; DADRI Dalian Institute of Architecture Design and Research Co. LTD, Dalian, P.R. China
Façade: Meinhardt Facade Technology Ltd. Beijing Branch Office, Beijing, P.R. China
General Contractor: China Construction Eight Engineering Division, Dalian, P.R. China
Client: Dalian Municipal People’s Government, P.R. China
Project Team: Nico Boyer, Liisi Salumaa, Anja Sorger, Vanessa Castro Vélez, Lei Feng, Reinhard Hacker, Jan Brosch, Veronika Janovska, Manfred Yuen, Matthias Niemeyer, Matt Kirkham, Peter Rose, Markus Wings, Ariane Marx, Wendy Fok, Reinhard Platzl, Debora Creel, Hui-Cheng, Jessie Chen, Simon Diesendruck, Yue Chen, Thomas Hindelang, Pola Dietrich, Moritz Keitel, Ian Robertson, Keigo Fukugaki, Gaspar Gonzalez Melero, Giacomo Tinari, Alice Gong
Model Building: Nam La-Chi, Paul Hoszowski, Taylor Clayton, Matthias Bornhofer, Katsyua Arai, Zhu Juankang, Lukas Allner, Phillip Reiner, Moritz Heinrath, Olivia Wimmer, Silja Wiener, Katrin Ertle, Maria Zagallo, Logan Yuen, André Nakonz, Arihan Senocak, Rashmi Jois, Sachin Thorat, Marc Werner



From the architect. The building has both to reflect the promising modern future of Dalian and its tradition as an important port, trade, industry and tourism city. The formal language of the project combines and merges the rational structure and organization of its modern conference center typology with the floating spaces of modernist architecture.

Dalian is an important seaport, industrial, trade, and tourism center, located in the southernmost part of the Liaodong Peninsula in the Chinese Liaoning Province.

The city is currently undergoing a wave of transformation on coastal brownfield and reclaimed land which will entirely change the city’s face within the next decade.

The key developments are:
•Dislocation of container port away from the dense city area
•Establishment of international port for cruise ships
•New development of a „CBD – Central Business District“ on reclaimed land
•Bridge over the sea to connect with the special economic zone

The urban design task of the Dalian International Conference Center is to create an instantly recognizable landmark at the terminal point of the future extension of the main city axis. As its focal point the building will be anchored in the mental landscape of the population and the international community.

The footprint of the building on the site is therefore arranged in accordance with the orientation of the two major urban axis which merge in front of the building.

The cantilevering conference spaces that penetrate the facades create a spatially multifaceted building volume and differentiate the close surroundings.

The various theaters and conference spaces are covered by a cone-shaped roof screen. Through controlled daylight input good spatial orientation for the visitors and atmospheric variety is assured.

The project combines the following functions within one hybrid building with synergetic effects of functionality and spatial richness.
•Conference Center
•Theater and Opera House
•Exhibition Center
•Basement with Parking, Delivery and Disposal

A public zone at ground level allows for differentiating accessibility for the different groups of users. The actual performance and conference spaces are situated at +15,30 m above the entrance hall. The grand theater, with a capacity of 1.600 seats and a stage tower, and the directly adjacent flexible conference hall of 2.500 seats, are positioned at the core of the building.

With this arrangement the main stage can be used for the classical theater auditorium as well as for the flexible multipurpose hall. The main auditorium is additionally equipped with backstage areas like in traditional theaters and opera houses. This scheme is appropriate to broaden the range of options for the use of this space: from convention, musical, theater even up to classical opera, with very little additional investment.

The smaller conference spaces are arranged like pearls around this core, providing very short connections between the different areas, thus saving time while changing between the different units. Most conference rooms and the circulation areas have direct daylight from above.


Through this open and fluid arrangement the theater and conference spaces on the main level establish a kind of urban structure with “squares” and “street spaces”. These identifiable “addresses” facilitate user orientation within the building. Thus the informal meeting places, as well as chill-out and catering zones, and in between the halls, gardens with view connection to outside are provided as required for modern conference utilization.

The access to the basement parking garage, truck delivery and waste disposal is located at the southwest side of the site, thus freeing the front driveway to the entrances from transit traffic. The main entrance from the sea side corresponds to the future developments, including the connection to the future cruise terminal.

Technical, Climatic and Environmental Concept

The focus of the architectural design and project development lies on technology, construction and their interplay. The technical systems fulfil the tasks required for the spatial use of the building automatically, invisibly and silently.


With the Dalian International Dalian Conference Center, these systems work like a hybrid city within a building. For the technical infrastructure of the building this means, that we have to consider a huge amount of people circulating inside the building at the same time, who expect high standards in circulation and comfort as well as a state of the art building with respect to high flexibility, low energy consumption and low use of natural resources.

Technical areas in the basement supply infrastructure within a rectangular grid, mainly inside the vertical cores. In particularly the conference zone has to be provided with a sufficient amount of air in order to maintain a high level of thermal and acoustical comfort. Therefore the conditioned air will be silently injected into the rooms via an inflated double flooring underneath the seating. Air blowout units inside the stairs will ensure consistent air distribution. Due to the thermal uplift, the heat of the people ascends to the ceiling and is extracted by suction.


One of the major tasks of sustainable architecture is the minimisation of energy consumption. A fundamental contribution is to avoid considerable fluctuations in demands during the course of the day. Therefore it is essential to integrate the natural resources of the environment like:

•Use the thermal energy of seawater with heat pumps for cooling in summer and heating in winter
•General use of low temperature systems for heating in combination with activation of the concrete core as thermal mass in order to keep the building on constant temperature
•Natural ventilation of the huge air volumes within the building allows for minimization of the mechanical apparatus for ventilation heating and cooling. The atrium is conceived as a solar heated, naturally ventilated sub climatic area.
•In the large volume individual areas can be treated separately by additional measures such as displacement ventilation
•A high degree of daylight use is aspired both for its positive psychological effect and for minimizing the power consumption for artificial lighting
•Energy production with solar energy panels integrated into the shape of the building.

Structural Concept

The structural concept is based on a sandwich structure composed of 2 elements: the “table” and the roof.

Both elements are steel space frames with depths ranging between 5 and 8 meters.

The whole structure is elevated 7 meters above ground level and is supported by 14 vertical composite steel and concrete cores.

A doubly ruled façade structure connects the two layers of table and roof, creating a load-bearing shell structure.

The application of new design and simulation techniques, the knowledge of local shipbuilders to bend massive steel plates, and the consumption of more than 40,000 tons of steel enables breathtaking spans of over 85 meters and cantilevering of over 40 meters.








































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Old July 31st, 2013, 05:30 PM   #117
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More grand designs for China
20 July 2013
The Australian Financial Review

Shanghai China's love affair with grand engineering projects is showing no sign of ending, even as the economy slows and President Xi Jinping rails against flashy monuments and lavish public buildings.

The push to proceed with large infrastructure projects appears to be part of a broader strategy to support growth in the world's second biggest economy, which is struggling amid weak exports and poor consumer sentiment.

In recent weeks, China has unveiled two projects it claims will be the world's largest.

The most grand is a 123-kilometre undersea tunnel across the Bohai Bay in northern China.

The project, which has an estimated cost of 260 billion yuan ($43 billion), is to be submitted to China's cabinet for approval shortly and is expected to take six years to complete. The tunnel will link the port cities of Dalian and Yantai via a high-speed train and cut travel times by more than seven hours.

It should also ensure another entry for China in the Guinness Book of Records. Local media reports say the Bohai tunnel will surpass Japan's Seikan Tunnel and the Channel Tunnel that connects Britain and France.


Ambitious hydro-electric dam

China is set to break another world record when it completes an ambitious hydro-electric dam in Sichuan Province during the next decade. It will have the world's tallest dam wall, at 314 metres, surpassing the Nurek dam in Tajikistan in central Asia, and is estimated to cost about $4 billion.

These two projects appear to be part of the government's broader strategy to support growth via increased infrastructure spending.

Growth in the economy slowed to 7.5 per cent in the second quarter, but the contribution of fixed asset investment was the highest in two years.

The increase in infrastructure spending comes despite a pledge by the central government to rebalance the economy to be more reliant on consumer spending.

But this push to change the drivers of growth is being hampered by Mr Xi's austerity drive, as he tries to rehabilitate the Communist Party's well-founded reputation for waste and extravagance.

Last week the organising committee for China's 12th National Games made much of a decision to cut the event's budget by 78 per cent to $140 million. There will be no welcome banquets for overseas guests, the opening ceremony will be delivered in a "frugal manner" and "only" 10 new venues will be constructed.Statues frowned upon

Statues and grand public buildings are increasingly frowned upon. Before taking over the presidency, Mr Xi said "image projects" should be halted.

"These luxurious and superficial 'image projects' waste people's money and manpower," he wrote in Study Times, a magazine affiliated with the Central Party School Publishing House.

"The officials' obsession with image projects seriously hurts the credibility of the [Communist] Party and government and affects their work. There is an urgent need for this to be rectified."

This commandment from Beijing looks to have been behind the tearing down of a 24-metre high sculpture, which covered an area of 800 square metres, in Henan Province last month.

The demolition was despite a local charity having already spent nearly $22 million erecting the giant monument. The directive from Mr Xi also means China is unlikely to build any more public buildings such as the CCTV tower in Beijing or the nearby National Centre for Performing Arts, known as The Egg.
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Old March 29th, 2014, 08:06 PM   #118
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A Chinese City's Parisian Love Affair
In the port city of Dalian, luxury-home buyers are demanding apartments in buildings with romantic, 19th-century exteriors; ornate facades with balconies, 'hot kitchens' inside
14 March 2014
The Wall Street Journal

In Dalian, a northern Chinese port city on the Yellow Sea, the hottest architectural trend is straight out of 19th-century Paris.

Dalian is going through a period romance with Western architecture, driving a Beaux-Arts boom in new residential buildings. Over the past few months, several American architecture firms known for their neoclassical designs have started construction on a variety of projects: from luxury apartments in mixed-use developments to expansive single-family villas. Their wealthy Chinese clients want homes in authentic-looking Beaux-Arts style: 19th-century and early 20th-century Paris-influenced design that features ornate details on large facades. They also are demanding interior designs that are sensitive to their own traditions.



Dalian, a city with a population of about 5.9 million, has a culturally blended past. Originally under the Qing dynasty, China's last imperial rule, Dalian fell under British, Russian and Japanese rule at different times over the late 19th and early 20th centuries, resulting in a city comprised of a variety of buildings. Western classical architecture denotes sophistication for some Chinese home buyers, developers say.

Local developers have sought out American architects as a way to guarantee authenticity. "There's a lot of neoclassical in China, but it's done by architects who just take an image and design from that," says James Sun, vice president of Dalian Yifang Group, which is developing a villa community in Wolong Bay near Dalian. "It would be like asking an American or European to design a Chinese temple."

Robert A.M. Stern Architects of New York, known for luxury buildings such as Manhattan's 15 Central Park West, is designing Dalian AVIC International Square, a mixed-use development in neoclassical style. It will cover four city blocks with a total of 1,600 homes. The first phase, set to be completed this year, will include apartments with one, two and three bedrooms, from as small as 323 square feet to 1,830 square feet. Prices will range from 700,000 yuan, or $114,000, to 4 million yuan, or $652,000.

Peter Pennoyer, a New York City-based architect, is creating duplexes and townhouses for the Xiao Yao (pronounced She-ow yow) Bay residential community of 900 homes. The complex, which also will offer a clubhouse and other amenities, is about 30 minutes outside of Dalian. The first phase -- 60 homes -- will begin selling in May, with prices starting at about $782,000. Made of concrete with limestone and brick veneers, the three-level, 3,000-square-foot homes will include a garage, an entertainment room, maid's quarters, living rooms, two kitchens and three bedrooms.

On a smaller scale, San Francisco-based architect Andrew Skurman is designing two, 15,000-square-foot homes, one in the Georgian style and one French Classical, each with stone cladding, five to six bedrooms and bathrooms, a wine cellar, an exercise room and an indoor pool. The homes, which haven't been priced and will be sold upon completion, will be located in the St. America development of about a dozen custom homes that overlook Dalian's rocky coastline.

On the southwest edge of the city, Aric Lasher of HBRA Architects in Chicago, is designing a community called French 1710. The first phase will have 37 connected townhouses and four single-family homes, ranging from 4,800 square feet to 6,900 square feet. Two future phases are planned, for a total of 265 homes.

To make the designs more historically accurate, Mr. Lasher drew inspiration from historic 17th- and 18th-century French buildings, giving the homes for French 1710 carved stone details such as niches, balconies, and keystones, along with slate roofs. The first phase is set to be completed in 2015. Each will have an estimated sales price of $653,000 to $1.3 million.

Mr. Lasher says some early design sketches he saw from the client were "extremely unregulated and unintentionally eclectic" -- a problem that had to be addressed, as they lacked the proper composition and proportion for authentic style.

The luxury market in Dalian has been heating up, with growth of the local economy and urbanization driving demand. It now makes up about 30% of the residential market. On average, Dalian's residential home prices climbed 8% in 2013 to $176 per square foot, according to DTZ, an international property consultancy. That figure is nearly double what it was in 2009.

Also driving demand for high-end properties is the fact that about 30,400 of China's millionaires live in Liaoning province, in which Dalian is a major city, according to the Hurun Research Institute, which tracks China's wealthy individuals.

For luxury buyers, low-rise dwellings remind them of traditional neighborhoods where the modern middle class no longer wants to live. Beaux-Arts architecture is a good fit for larger buildings.

The local appetite for Beaux-Arts architecture "may be even exaggerated because they were starved of it" in the Cultural Revolution and to the end of the 20th century, says Paul Whalen, one of the architects of Robert A.M. Stern's project.

The lack of land in Dalian, as in most of China, is also an issue. Even pricey homes are often in high-density areas, proving challenging for design.

Cultural differences add to the challenges. Many Chinese prefer living rooms and master bedrooms to face south because they are considered the most important rooms and should get the best sun during the winter. Bedroom windows have to be strategically placed, as Chinese buyers who adhere to the feng shui sense of balance don't like beds to either face or be placed against windows. Also, the end of each hallway must have a focal point for, say, a piece of artwork or a fountain.

All of the architects had to design two kitchens for each home: a Western kitchen with sleek countertops and stovetops for light cooking and entertaining, and a "hot" or Chinese kitchen, for deep-frying and butchering meat.

In most of the projects, local architects take over once the initial designs are completed because structural and mechanical building standards vary. Some plans can be misread or details can be literally lost in translation. "We work through an interpreter," Mr. Skurman of San Francisco says, "so I never have had a real conversation with the principal of the development company."

Still, the Dalian projects are an architect's dream: Budgets are malleable and developers want the best in materials. The local developers also are open to suggestions and see their projects as an investment in bringing the country into the 21st century. Their goals, Mr. Pennoyer says, go beyond "simply building and turning a profit."
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Old April 24th, 2014, 06:42 PM   #119
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Fire at Dalian block of flats raises concerns about building safety compliance
22 April 2014
South China Morning Post



A fire that broke out at a 34-storey block of flats in Dalian yesterday prompted renewed concerns over fire safety in high-rise buildings on the mainland.

State media reported that external insulating material caught fire, with the flames quickly spreading to the interior of the building. No deaths or injuries were reported.

"The smoke was so thick and black. It quickly covered the top of the building," said a sales assistant at an optometrist's shop located 300 metres away.

The Jiete Apartments building is a local landmark at Xinghai Square, one of the largest city squares in the country. The building was completed in November 2011 and comprises mostly studio-sized apartments.

The flats are priced at more than 15,000 yuan (HK$19,000) per square metre, about 1.5 times the average price in the city, according to local property agents. But even in premium priced properties, developers commonly use cheaper materials, experts say.

"Fire-retardant materials cost 50 per cent more than common materials that can easily catch fire," said the owner of a shop selling fire extinguishers, who did not want to be named. The rules and penalties for this type of construction fraud are weak Fire extinguisher salesman, Dalian

He explained that the true quality of many construction materials was difficult to gauge by eye. When construction quality inspections are compromised, developers can easily replace expensive fire-retardant materials with cheaper but flammable materials.

"Unfortunately, the rules and penalties for this type of construction fraud are too weak. It provides chances to opportunists," he said. "We continue to see fire accidents."

On November 15, 2010, a 30-storey apartment block in Shanghai undergoing renovation caught fire, killing 50 residents - mostly retired teachers - and injuring 70 others. The fire started after welders, in violation of safety regulations, worked near flammable materials such as nylon netting, wire and polyurethane foam. They were estimated to have caused more than 500 million yuan in damage.

Another costly high-rise fire occurred at the newly built, 34-storey China Central Television headquarters in February, 2009.

Xinhua reported that a fireworks company ignited powerful illegal fireworks which set the building on fire.

The blaze killed one firefighter and injured seven others. The damage from that fire was about 160 million yuan.
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Old March 8th, 2015, 05:44 PM   #120
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Li calls Bohai passage a 'must-have' for region
China Daily Excerpt
2015-03-07

Premier says cross-strait project would break Shandong-Liaoning transportation bottlenecks

Premier Li Keqiang firmly supports the idea to build a cross-Bohai Strait passage, equivalent to nearly two times the length of the UK's Channel Tunnel, a move to promote regional logistics and encourage investment.

Li, who is a deputy to the Shandong delegation of the National People's Congress, joined the panel discussion on Friday. He called the project - which would link Lushun, Liaoning province, on the Liaodong Peninsula in the north, with Penglai, on the Shandong Peninsula to the south - "a must-have move" to break transportation bottlenecks in the region.

If completed, the cross-strait passage would extend from China's traditional heavy industry hub in the northeast across Bohai Bay, the innermost gulf of the Yellow Sea, and reach East China's Shandong province. It would cut the current travel time between these provinces from more than six hours to about 40 minutes. The passage is designed to be 83 kilometers.

The Bohai Rim is one of China's most important economic areas, with more than 150 cities and a population of 300 million.

Wang Mengshu, a tunnel and railway expert at the Chinese Academy of Engineering, said the passage, together with existing rail lines, would make up an East China transport artery connecting 11 provincial areas of 5,700 kilometers and would have "great economic and strategic significance".

Among three cross-strait projects being researched - the cross-Bohai Strait passage project, a cross-Taiwan Straits project and a cross-Qiongzhou Strait project - the cross-Bohai Strait passage project would be the largest, with a planned investment of 300 billion yuan ($48 billion), Wang said.
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