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Old March 4th, 2008, 04:04 PM   #21
ddes
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First railways, then metro, then monorail, now maglev?
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Old March 4th, 2008, 05:10 PM   #22
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Why would anyone want to use a Maglev as a suburban train? Surely a speed of 500km/h is not needed in Mumbai's suburbs? The track length will be only between 20 and 50 km, and there will be many stations considering it are suburban lines! Just upgrade your suburban heavy rail and invest in a metro, no need for a Maglev!
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Old March 4th, 2008, 07:52 PM   #23
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Joop20 View Post
Why would anyone want to use a Maglev as a suburban train? Surely a speed of 500km/h is not needed in Mumbai's suburbs? The track length will be only between 20 and 50 km, and there will be many stations considering it are suburban lines! Just upgrade your suburban heavy rail and invest in a metro, no need for a Maglev!
Is Mumbai going to invest in the high-speed Shanghai maglev or will it be the Japanese linimo? Because linimo makes more sense but it is still tragically expensive and economically inefficient. Yeah Mumbai should stay away from maglevs for its own good.

On the other hand, if it wants to flaunt the fact that it is capable of constructing a maglev metro, then that should be interesting. In fact it would be really cool.
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Old March 14th, 2010, 12:57 AM   #24
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Is the Maglev project between Delhi & Bombay still on ?
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Old March 18th, 2011, 06:09 PM   #25
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was it ever on
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Old March 18th, 2011, 06:34 PM   #26
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Earlier this year, I spent nearly one month "living" in India's trains. Honestly speaking, India's trains are too slow, too old, and lacks of maintenance. India's trains running at 35 km/h pitched and rolled even worse than a Chinese train running at 350 km/h. China spent 10 years (1997–2007) on upgrading existing rail infrastructure before introducing a real bullet train. Today's India's rail system is not much better than China's in 1997. I think, if India indeed wants to do something on its railway system, it should do it by upgrading existing railway infrastructures first. Retire those rail cars without a door or with self-service doors. Keep those monkeys, dogs, sheep and cows off trunk railways and main railway stations. Do not even think about bullet trains before these works are done.

By the way, India has a great online ticketing system.

Last edited by yaohua2000; March 18th, 2011 at 06:41 PM.
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Old March 18th, 2011, 06:46 PM   #27
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India has a train network of epic proportions. and the people that travel on them are countless. There have been improvements but they really dont seem to reflect as its a giant behemoth. Plus theres red tape involved which is notoriously slow.

On a different note the trains may not be fast or swanky but the value for money they provide (especially AC 3 tier and above) is incredible. And apart from that the train journeys are never boring . You can loaf around the stations, have some hot fritters, tea etc. Of course if you get stomach crunches you probably are screwed :P
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Old March 19th, 2011, 02:07 PM   #28
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Quote:
Originally Posted by yaohua2000 View Post
Earlier this year, I spent nearly one month "living" in India's trains. Honestly speaking, India's trains are too slow, too old, and lacks of maintenance. India's trains running at 35 km/h pitched and rolled even worse than a Chinese train running at 350 km/h. China spent 10 years (1997–2007) on upgrading existing rail infrastructure before introducing a real bullet train. Today's India's rail system is not much better than China's in 1997. I think, if India indeed wants to do something on its railway system, it should do it by upgrading existing railway infrastructures first. Retire those rail cars without a door or with self-service doors. Keep those monkeys, dogs, sheep and cows off trunk railways and main railway stations. Do not even think about bullet trains before these works are done.
Why complete retiring these rail cars?

China started upgrading old railways back in 1991 with speed up improvement of old Guangzhou-Shenzhen railway two tracks and adding third track. Just 150 km out of the network. So in December 1994, 160 km/h traffic started.

And in 1998, Guangshen railway was electrified - and, with X2000 trains, sped to 200 km/h.

With the six speed up campaigns, by April 2007, China had lines as fast as 250 km/h (Qinhuangdao-Shenyang) and something like 14 000 km at 160 km/h of 160 km/h or faster - but still just 22 000 km lines for 120 km/h or faster. Most railways of China still could not have even 120 km/h.

Has China continued speeding up and upgrading old railways after opening of new high speed lines in 2007? Now, as of 2011, how much railway lines does China have that cannot support as much as 120 km/h?

India has express trains as fast as 160 km/h for some time (Shatabdis, between Delhi and Agra). What could be the first rail line in India to be upgraded to 200 or 180 km/h?
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Old March 19th, 2011, 02:28 PM   #29
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Why would you say that ? India and China have problems such as overcrowding which are unique to us and only us. So if China finds a solution to one of its problems which happens to be similar to ours why wouldnt we use it if it helps ease us ?
Well for starters Maglev isn't the way to go as of now. If it is the Chinese would of poured billions of dollars into Magleving the entire country but they did not. They decided conventional highspeed rail was the way to go and today you see the path they chose. The Maglev extension from Shanghai to Hangzhou has yet to be finalized and they've been talking about that for over 6yrs. Chinese aren't known for stalling projects unless they face strong opposition and know that it doesn't really benefit the society as a whole.
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Old March 21st, 2011, 03:21 AM   #30
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From moroccan forum

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Inde, études de LGV

27/2/2009

Les études de préfaisabilité de la première LGV indienne ont été confiées à Systra. A la vitesse maximale de 350 km/h, le train devra relier Pune à Mumbai (93 km) en 25 minutes contre trois heures aujourd'hui, et Mumbai à Ahmedabad (440 km) en moins de deux heures contre sept heures. D'ici à six mois, Systra devra notamment étudier deux hypothèses : construction en viaduc ou en tunnel. Le contrat se monte à 150 millions de roupies (2,35 millions d'euros). Les chemins de fer indiens vont faire réaliser des études de préfaisabilité sur six corridors à grande vitesse : Pune - Mumbai - Ahmedabad, Delhi - Patna, Delhi - Chandigarh - Amritsar, Hyderabad - Dornakal - Vijayawada - Chennai, Chennai - Bangalore - Coimbatore - Ernakulam et Howrah - Haldia. Le coût de construction de LGV en viaduc est estimé à 500 millions de roupies (7,85 millions d'euros) du kilomètre.
http://bcprioult.free.fr/mondelignesencon/index.html

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India, studies of LGV

27/2/2009

The pre-feasibility studies of the first Indian HSR have been entrusted to Systra. A maximum speed of 350 km / h, the train will connect Pune to Mumbai (93 km) in 25 minutes against three hours now, and Mumbai to Ahmedabad (440 km) in less than two hours against seven. By six months, including Systra will consider two cases: building bridge or tunnel. The contract is worth 150 million rupees (2.35 million). The Indian Railways will make pre-feasibility studies on six high-speed corridors: Pune - Mumbai - Ahmedabad, Delhi - Patna, Delhi - Chandigarh - Amritsar, Hyderabad - Dornakal - Vijayawada - Chennai, Chennai - Bangalore - Coimbatore - Ernakulam and Howrah - Haldia. The construction cost of LGV in the viaduct is estimated at 500 million rupees (7.85 million) per kilometer
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Old March 21st, 2011, 03:46 AM   #31
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I took that Shatabdis train, and it was far, far from running at 160 kph. Cars were passing the train on little rural roads. Its about 200 Km between Delhi and Agra. At 160 kph, even allowing for some stops, it should take 90 minutes to 2 hours. It took over 4 hours between the two cities. India trains have a looooooong way to go, but I don't doubt that in 30 years India will have a great rail network.
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Old March 21st, 2011, 07:50 AM   #32
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who fooled you about Shatabdis running at 160 kmph?
they run at a highest speed of around 140 kmph but mostly the average is somewhere around 90-100. The train must have been running late that day. It normally takes 2 hours to cover the distance between New Delhi and Agra in Shatabdi. The distance between the two cities is 195 km.

And regarding the rail network well India already has a great network. what it does need is renovation and up-gradation.
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Old March 22nd, 2011, 07:47 PM   #33
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Quote:
Originally Posted by sidney_jec View Post
who fooled you about Shatabdis running at 160 kmph?
they run at a highest speed of around 140 kmph but mostly the average is somewhere around 90-100. The train must have been running late that day. It normally takes 2 hours to cover the distance between New Delhi and Agra in Shatabdi. The distance between the two cities is 195 km.
I was fooled by this:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bhopal_Shatabdi_Express

While Bhopal Shatabdi is said to reach maximum 160 km/h, the average is 93 km/h. All other Shatabdis are slower, both maximum and average speeds.
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Old March 23rd, 2011, 06:39 PM   #34
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Quote:
Originally Posted by chornedsnorkack View Post
I was fooled by this:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bhopal_Shatabdi_Express

While Bhopal Shatabdi is said to reach maximum 160 km/h, the average is 93 km/h. All other Shatabdis are slower, both maximum and average speeds.
Yes, speed of trains is somewhat low. I think it would be quite some time before high speed trains actually start to run in India since their cost is reasonably high and still there is a lot to be done in terms of general railway infrastructure.
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Old March 23rd, 2011, 10:47 PM   #35
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Quote:
Originally Posted by chornedsnorkack View Post
I was fooled by this:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bhopal_Shatabdi_Express

While Bhopal Shatabdi is said to reach maximum 160 km/h, the average is 93 km/h. All other Shatabdis are slower, both maximum and average speeds.


Speed profile of 12952 Mumbai Rajdhani from New Delhi to Mumbai Central
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Old March 23rd, 2011, 11:06 PM   #36
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Looking at a map, Mumbai-Surat-Ahmedabad looks like a great route to start a HSR network, it connects 3 of Indias 10 biggest cities and several other large cities in between, and the land is flat, making it easy to build the railway. Mumbai-Pune on the other hand might be better as a later addition, because it's through mountains and will require lots of tunnels and bridges, which is expensive and often leads to cost overruns.

Looking at wikipedia articles about Rail in India, Dehli-Kanpur might be a better idea, though, because it looks like there are much more trains running already on that route. Though I'm not quite certain if current train travellers would be the primary target group for HSR, and I've no idea about airtravel within India.
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Old March 25th, 2011, 09:58 AM   #37
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I see the scheduled time Mumbai-Delhi quoted as 15:50, for example
http://indiarailinfo.com/train/1351

1384 km. Delhi-Calcutta is a bit under or over 1500 km, depending on route, and has about 17 hour trip of Duronto.

The distances Delhi-Mumbai and Delhi-Calcutta look quite similar to the 1463 distance between Beijing and Shanghai on the old railway.

And both overnight and day CRH trains cover the distance in about 10 hours.

When was the best time Beijing-Shanghai in the range of 16...17 hours like Delhi-Mumbai and Delhi-Calcutta now?

And what was the first thing Chinese did to improve it?
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Old March 26th, 2011, 05:45 PM   #38
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Quote:
Originally Posted by yaohua2000 View Post
Earlier this year, I spent nearly one month "living" in India's trains. Honestly speaking, India's trains are too slow, too old, and lacks of maintenance. India's trains running at 35 km/h pitched and rolled even worse than a Chinese train running at 350 km/h. China spent 10 years (1997–2007) on upgrading existing rail infrastructure before introducing a real bullet train. Today's India's rail system is not much better than China's in 1997. I think, if India indeed wants to do something on its railway system, it should do it by upgrading existing railway infrastructures first. Retire those rail cars without a door or with self-service doors. Keep those monkeys, dogs, sheep and cows off trunk railways and main railway stations. Do not even think about bullet trains before these works are done.

By the way, India has a great online ticketing system.

I agree. The upgrading of existing railway infrastructure is a necessity before any scenario for HSR can be envisioned. To me it doesn't make sense to completely overhaul the system as that take much longer. Existing tracks can be upgraded to handle express trains and then we can have international bids for popular routes. Transfer of technology will enable us to produce own our trains. To me that will take at least 10 years, if work starts now. I don't see the political will right now though.
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Old March 28th, 2011, 10:10 PM   #39
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Since the majority of Indian's railway use broadgauge, it's not that difficult to upgrade to a higher speed limit. The only problem is that there are four different gauges used, so connection can be a problem, but that's not the most pressing concern anyway.
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Old March 28th, 2011, 11:16 PM   #40
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Not a problem with an automatic changing gauge system as the one using in Spain where there are 3 differents gauges but not recommended with full HSR.


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