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Old November 4th, 2013, 12:53 PM   #861
beto_chaves
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Quote:
Originally Posted by darko06 View Post
Thank you for these pictures. I am impressed with quality of International Style architecture in Angola before 1975. How can be possible that so called "dictatorship" in its "colony" had built better architecture than the "comrades" in the former Deutsche Demokratische Republik?
I am a great admirer of Portuguese architecture and infrastructure (let's say Ponte da Arrabida in Porto) and it seems that the history of so called Portuguese Colonial International Style should be written or rewritten from the scratch.
You´re welcome darko06!

Indeed very interesting architecture style. 60's and 70's had really nice architecture in Portugal (in the mainland and in Africa). In the cases of Angola and Mozambique, all the cities were developed from the scratch, that's why they seem so well planned. On the other hand, if you look to 'old' Portugal in Europe, even during the same dates, this nice architecture style is not so evident!
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Old November 4th, 2013, 03:33 PM   #862
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Let's say that Portuguese mainland and colonial architecture in 60s and 70s is aesthetically far better than the Yugoslav architecture from the same period (Slovenian architecture included).
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Old November 4th, 2013, 03:40 PM   #863
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So why the heck did they do some stupid commie revolution?

For example, the so-noticed Chinese protestors in the news are actually a really marginal group among the people: people doesn't care wether there is some democracy or not, because things are continuously getting better in what comes to living standards, now also in the countryside.
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Old November 4th, 2013, 03:52 PM   #864
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So why the heck did they do some stupid commie revolution?

For example, the so-noticed Chinese protestors in the news are actually a really marginal group among the people: people doesn't care wether there is some democracy or not, because things are continuously getting better in what comes to living standards, now also in the countryside.
The Carnation Revolution was not stupid. Firstly, Portugal would never win the war and the government would not end it. Secondly, just because they built nice buildings, doesn't mean that people were well educated (if you finished primary school you were lucky), the infant mortality rate was shocking, there was no free healthcare, women had to get permission to travel, illegitimate children had their 'status' on all their documents.
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Old November 4th, 2013, 04:01 PM   #865
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Why are we talking about communism again?
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Old November 4th, 2013, 04:10 PM   #866
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The Carnation Revolution was not stupid. Firstly, Portugal would never win the war and the government would not end it. Secondly, just because they built nice buildings, doesn't mean that people were well educated (if you finished primary school you were lucky), the infant mortality rate was shocking, there was no free healthcare, women had to get permission to travel, illegitimate children had their 'status' on all their documents.
I ment the Angola and Mozambique ones - any progress hasn't happened since 1975, things have got much worse. The leaders of these revolutions just took the wealth of the portuguese.

Portugal luckily didn't at last become an eastern block state in the west, but a western democracy.
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Old November 28th, 2013, 05:32 PM   #867
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Highways damaged by the 1989 San Francisco earthquake



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Old December 12th, 2013, 11:53 PM   #868
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Border between Austria and Slovenia/Yugoslavia in 1964 on the Wurzenpass/Korensko sedlo:




http://www.technischesmuseum.at/moto...articleid/2395


http://www.delcampe.net/page/item/id...anguage,E.html
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Old December 13th, 2013, 08:12 PM   #869
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Roads in 1930ies Latvia

Just a regular road in the countryside - the Skaista-Dagda road. BTW "Skaista" translates to "Beautiful".

Road down leading down to the Gauja river the bridge over which you can see in the background.

A roadsign at the intersection of the now A2/E77 and P27 roads. The sign features carved ornaments which look like our traditional signs, but I can't find an exact match so it seems to be simply for looks. Nowadays it's a two level interchange; still in the middle of a forest.

A different kind of roadsigns. This one is near the border with Estonia since only one of the locations on the sign is in Latvia.

The border crossing of Latvia with Estonia. The barriers are in the colors of the flags so the one in the foreground is maroon and white while the one in the background is blue, black and white.

A bridge in the capital city of Rīga. An interesting fact is that there was sort of a floating swimming pool attached to the bridge where the people could go and take a swim and not have to travel to the beach. Nowadays the pool is gone but there is a new beach just a kilometer upstream. The sight is quite surreal. (Photo by mieramika)

One of the few traffic lights that we had.
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Old December 18th, 2013, 12:18 AM   #870
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Starý most (literally "Old bridge"), first bridge over Danube in Bratislava finished its life on 2nd December 2013. The bridge is being taken apart right now.

The bridge was originally build in 1889 - 1890, named after Franz Joseph (Franz Joseph Bridge) and after the break up of Austria-Hungary renamed after M.R. Stefanik (Famous Slovak politician). One side of bridge was designated for trams, second one for train. The bridge was partially destroyed in 1945 by retreating German army. Shortly in 1918 - 1919 and 1938 - 1945, the bridge served as border crossing between Czechoslovakia and Hungary or Third Reich respectively.








The restoration of destroyed bridge started immediately by Soviet army and was finished in 1946 as the simple provisional solution (thus to be restored in full shape within ten years later in post-war times). Therefore, some architectural features was not taken into account (e.g. the vault on the segment in between).

Unfortunately, the provisional solution along with the fact that bridge was not well cared of caused that in 1961 the tram track ought to have been removed from the bridge (reducing the tram network in Bratislava solely to left river bank). Twenty years after, remaining railway track through the city centre was replaced by new one bypassing the city through the new railway bridge and therefore, Old bridge remained designated only for cars (although the railway side of bridge stayed untouched with railway track with dead ends up to now).


In 1968 - Warsaw pact intervention in Czechoslovakia. Note the tram track was still present, thought it was not already in operation.


In 70s without tram track already.


In early 2000s


Redundant of railway side of bridge


Abandoned railway side on the left, road traffic side (here in operation yet) on the right.




In 2009, due to state of emergency, the bridge was closed for road traffic (except public transport buses) , in 2010 for public transport as well.



Just after the closure of old bridge due to state of emergency caused by unfavourable statics (in 2010) guarded by police.



Inhabitants of Bratislava saying "goodbye" to bridge at last evening (1st December of 2013)





Disassembling of the bridge. It will have been completely taken apart in March 2014.



Visualization of "New" Old bridge. Trams are planned to expand back to the right river bank after 50 year again. This is how we care about historical heritage :-(
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Old December 18th, 2013, 05:44 PM   #871
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I am intrigued! So much so that I want to write about a similar looking long gone bridge in the city of Rīga, Lativa.

Dzelzs tilts (Iron bridge) was, as the name implies, the first iron bridge over the river Daugava. Built between 1871 and 1872 was 737 meters long and made up of 8 spans with a swing section on the right bank.

The roadway was 9,75 meters wide and included railway tracks. There were pedestrian sidewalks on both sides of the bridge outside the metal trusses.

The railway usage was increasing. It turned out that this bridge wasn't wide enough for a double track railway line. So by 1914 a new double track railway-only bridge was built right next to this one. With that the old bridge was reclassified as a public transport and road traffic bridge.
In the picture below the new bridge is on the left, old bridge - right.

In 1917 both bridges were blown up by the Russian army which was boldly retreating. For the Iron bridge it was the 3 middle spans. The blown up Iron bridge pieces were replaced with wooden spans which were then damaged by Bermont's army in 1919 and burnt down completely in 1920. In the picture the Iron bridge is on the right.

During Latvia's independence years we slowly (from 1925 to 1938) rebuilt the bridge completely and renamed it Zemgales tilts. By now you probably understand that it is still the one on the right.

The new girders were wider than the old ones so now the roadway was 10,40 meters wide and included two tram tracks. And there were two 2,2 meter wide sidewalks on both sides. It was intended for the rebuilt bridge to be converted for railway usage when it would be needed since the railway bridge now had two tracks of different gauges - one in European width for Rīga-Berlin high speed train and the second in Russian gauge for domestic traffic.

But the plans, the bridge, our independence and everything else ended with WWII. In just 6 years Zemgales tilts went from grand opening to being completely destroyed. Firstly, in 1941 the Red army destroyed some spans of the bridge.

And in 1944 the Germans destroyed it completely. You can't even tell which parts are from which bridge.

Zemgales tilts never did get rebuilt while the Railway bridge did. All that is left from Zemgales tilts are the remains of the abutments. The one in the picture below now looks much better - there is a new promenade and the top of the pier is now a beautiful flower garden - but I can't find a new picture.

There are plans of rebuilding the bridge but it certainly won't be done with the city's money so until there is a private project, nothing will be built. I'll end with two areal shots of both bridges in 1924 and 2010s and a contemporary picture of the Railway bridge.

image hosted on flickr


image hosted on flickr

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Old December 18th, 2013, 10:41 PM   #872
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Talking about old bridges, I have decided to show you some strange level crossings in Bratislava due to track running through the city up to 1981 (red on map).

Here is the map


"Railway bypass" (purple on map) was completed in 1981, but some redundant part of former railway are still present (e.g track on the aforementioned Old bridge).



Click to see it now



Click to see it now



Click to see it now



Railway station replaced by business centres

Remained and abandoned railway station with dead end on the bottom (south)
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Old December 18th, 2013, 11:38 PM   #873
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Novi Sad in Serbia had interesting history of railway. It came from Subotica in 1883, when new railway bridge was built:



It was blown up twice during World War II, in 1941 and 1944.



Since then, we have this:



From 1945 to 1962, railway used rebuilt road bridge:













This was just temporary solution (it caused traffic problems and smoke in houses by which train passed ). New railway and road bridge (destroyed in 1999 during NATO bombing) together with new railway station was built on the other location:











Old railway station (demolished):



My sketch:

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Old December 18th, 2013, 11:42 PM   #874
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the eighth photo - woow
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Old December 18th, 2013, 11:51 PM   #875
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Close the windows!

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Old December 18th, 2013, 11:57 PM   #876
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Close the windows!

Apparently, respective people took it easy
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Old December 28th, 2013, 05:22 PM   #877
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50 pictures of the construction of the AP-6 Villalba-Villacastín in Spain (1971): https://plus.google.com/photos/10162...537?banner=pwa

Source: http://www.apratizando.com/2012/12/f...de-guadarrama/

Thanks to miliar
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Os dejo el enlace a una interesante colección de fotografías aéreas tomadas en 1971 durante la construcción de la autopista A-6 Villalba-Villacastín (actual AP-6).

Fotografías aéreas de la construcción del segundo túnel de Guadarrama


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Old January 23rd, 2014, 10:07 PM   #878
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Bridge over Jiu river in during the protest of Romanian miners in January 1999. The miners are crossing the bridge in this way because the state authorities blocked the bridge with large rocks to prevent them from crossing.



More pictures from the protests on mediafax.ro.
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Old March 30th, 2014, 03:09 AM   #879
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Italian motorway police in the 1970s, using an Alfa Romeo Giulia 1600


Building the "autostrada" Turin - Milan (1931)


Autostrada Naples - Pompei, opened in 1929


Paying toll on the "autostrada" Genova - Serravalle, 1958


Automatic toll payiment in the 1970s. 50 ITL is less than 0,03€ with the 1999 exchange rate.


Autostrada Napoli - Pompei with the Vesuvio in the background, 1930s


Bergamo terminus of the autostrada Milan - Bergamo in 1928


Digging of Servola tunnel, SS202 Trieste, 1985


A4-A13 junction in Padova, 1980s or early 1990s


RA17 (now A34) near Villesse exit in 2006 (not that old but it has changed a lot since then)
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In real life, electronic toll collection was first introduced in Bergen, Norway in 1986, and well into the 21th century many countries still struggle to implement it.

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Old March 30th, 2014, 11:27 AM   #880
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when did Italy change yellow side lines to white? were yellow present at national roads too, or only motorways?
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