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Old May 24th, 2016, 10:08 PM   #1381
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The oldest continually used paved road in Hungary was a Roman road at Érd:


The road got a new asphalt overlay some years ago and the only remains is this short section...
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Old May 25th, 2016, 01:13 AM   #1382
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Originally Posted by italystf View Post
That road looks like the same today. Are they the same concrete slabs from the 1930s?
Yes, they're still the same concrete slabs. The road was officially finished in 1938, but most of it was opened already in 1937, and the first part(s) maybe even in 1936. In 1940 it was extended to Naklo and they built Radovljica bypass (~5 km). The road led to Bled to boost tourism.
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Old May 25th, 2016, 01:31 AM   #1383
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Yes, they're still the same concrete slabs. The road was officially finished in 1938, but most of it was opened already in 1937, and the first part(s) maybe even in 1936. In 1940 it was extended to Naklo and they built Radovljica bypass (~5 km). The road led to Bled to boost tourism.
So this is one of the rare pre-war concrete slabs roads still left in Europe.
That kind of pavement was also used on German Reichautobahnnen and early Italian 1+1 autostrade in the interbellum period.
Of course most of them don't exist anymore. I can only think of the Polish road 18/E36 and of the Russian road E28 in the Kaliningrad oblast, both parts of the Reichautobahn system.
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Old May 25th, 2016, 01:59 AM   #1384
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Originally Posted by elbong View Post
The oldest continually used paved road in Hungary was a Roman road at Érd:


The road got a new asphalt overlay some years ago and the only remains is this short section...
I kind of like this solution
It is bad to cover what is ancient, but if it is still being used, it needs to be usable... this way at least some of the history is preserved
Here's Via Appia in Rome

https://www.google.ca/maps/@41.87126...7i13312!8i6656
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Old May 25th, 2016, 02:59 AM   #1385
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Quote:
Originally Posted by italystf View Post
So this is one of the rare pre-war concrete slabs roads still left in Europe.
That kind of pavement was also used on German Reichautobahnnen and early Italian 1+1 autostrade in the interbellum period.
Of course most of them don't exist anymore. I can only think of the Polish road 18/E36 and of the Russian road E28 in the Kaliningrad oblast, both parts of the Reichautobahn system.
There is also this short section left by Logatec (~2 km), but they don't wanna repave it because of Napoleon's linden trees along it. It's pretty shaky; speed limit is 90 km/h, but it's better to drive half that speed.
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Old May 25th, 2016, 11:45 AM   #1386
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Originally Posted by Verso View Post
There is also this short section left by Logatec (~2 km), but they don't wanna repave it because of Napoleon's linden trees along it.
I think this road was contructed after war. Repavement is planned for this year (source). Repavement of the road is officially allowed as it cannot hurt trees. Also black ice did most of the damage 2 years ago so most of the trees were replaced recently.
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Old May 25th, 2016, 12:12 PM   #1387
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MALAYSIA

Kuala Lumpur-Karak Highway

Picture at 7.1.1978 taken from blog http://kitamanusiakelana.blogspot.my...pembinaan.html











Now this highway become 6 lane full controlled access highway with code E8/FT2 extension from Karak at state of Pahang to East Coast of Peninsular Malaysia and called East-Coast Expressway (Lebuhraya Pantai Timur) with 4 phase. Current phase is LPT 1 from Kuala Lumpur to Jabur at state of Terengganu. It will continue until phase 4 to Malaysia-Thailand border.

Here is current picture of the highway.









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Old May 25th, 2016, 12:36 PM   #1388
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I think this road was contructed after war. Repavement is planned for this year (source). Repavement of the road is officially allowed as it cannot hurt trees. Also black ice did most of the damage 2 years ago so most of the trees were replaced recently.
I would say that this part is constructed before the Second World War as part of paved road from Ljubljana to former Yugoslav-Italian border near Rakek-Postojna/Postumia. In 1930es, in Kingdom of Yugoslavia there was started a moderate road refurbishment or new construction program.
In Slovenian part (Drava Banate) were built roads from Ljubljana to Naklo, and from Kropa near Radovljica to Bled. Missing part from Naklo to Kropa (and Ljubelj/Loibl) was built in early sixties as first Yugoslav Swiss-like half-motorway with narrow hard shoulders, except on bridges and in tunnels. Second road was from Ljubljana to Italian border.
In Croatian part (Sava and Litoral Banate, later the Banate of Croatia) were built concrete paved roads from Zagreb to Bregana (Slovenian border) in Ljubljana direction, from Zagreb to Božjakovina in Belgrade direction, and concrete (?) road from Trogir to Split (today old Kaštelanska road), further were started works from Zagreb to Sušak (Rijeka was part of Kingdom of Italy), particularly from Zagreb to Lučko/Stupnik and from Karlovac to Duga Resa, finally an asphalt-paved road from Sušak to Novi Vinodolski.
It is fair to say that the Italians asphalted all main roads from Rijeka/Fiume and Istria to Friuli in the same time, i.e. Rijeka-Postojna, Rijeka-Rupa-Kozina-Trieste, Rijeka-Pula-Koper-Trieste, Plomin-Pazin-Poreč etc. etc.
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Old May 25th, 2016, 02:53 PM   #1389
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Originally Posted by darko06 View Post
I would say that this part is constructed before the Second World War as part of paved road from Ljubljana to former Yugoslav-Italian border near Rakek-Postojna/Postumia. In 1930es, in Kingdom of Yugoslavia there was started a moderate road refurbishment or new construction program.
In Slovenian part (Drava Banate) were built roads from Ljubljana to Naklo, and from Kropa near Radovljica to Bled. Missing part from Naklo to Kropa (and Ljubelj/Loibl) was built in early sixties as first Yugoslav Swiss-like half-motorway with narrow hard shoulders, except on bridges and in tunnels. Second road was from Ljubljana to Italian border.
In Croatian part (Sava and Litoral Banate, later the Banate of Croatia) were built concrete paved roads from Zagreb to Bregana (Slovenian border) in Ljubljana direction, from Zagreb to Božjakovina in Belgrade direction, and concrete (?) road from Trogir to Split (today old Kaštelanska road), further were started works from Zagreb to Sušak (Rijeka was part of Kingdom of Italy), particularly from Zagreb to Lučko/Stupnik and from Karlovac to Duga Resa, finally an asphalt-paved road from Sušak to Novi Vinodolski.
It is fair to say that the Italians asphalted all main roads from Rijeka/Fiume and Istria to Friuli in the same time, i.e. Rijeka-Postojna, Rijeka-Rupa-Kozina-Trieste, Rijeka-Pula-Koper-Trieste, Plomin-Pazin-Poreč etc. etc.
It's difficult to find data about when Italian roads had been paved for the first time. I've read on Wikipedia that SS9 between Milan and Rimini was paved with asphalt in 1929, but that's all.
What is available are the Italian SS-numbers that were once assigned to roads in territories that we lost to Yugoslavia after WWII.
Even areas of Slovenia, Dalmatia and Montenegro briefly occupied (and formally annexed as Italian provinces of Lubiana, Zara, Spalato and Cattaro) in 1941-43, had some SS numbers.
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In real life, electronic toll collection was first introduced in Bergen, Norway in 1986, and well into the 21th century many countries still struggle to implement it.

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Old May 25th, 2016, 03:28 PM   #1390
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Originally Posted by darko06 View Post
I would say that this part is constructed before the Second World War as part of paved road from Ljubljana to former Yugoslav-Italian border near Rakek-Postojna/Postumia. .
Road Ljubljana-Vrhnika was built in 1947 and continuation to Planina (close to previous YU-I border) was finished in 1954.

I looked to Google and found my own post about that
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Old May 25th, 2016, 03:54 PM   #1391
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Originally Posted by darko06 View Post
Missing part from Naklo to Kropa (and Ljubelj/Loibl) was built in early sixties as first Yugoslav Swiss-like half-motorway with narrow hard shoulders
Expressway Naklo-Ljubelj was opened in 1964, and Podtabor-Črnivec in 1966. But hard shoulders don't look narrow to me, if you look in the distance, and I doubt they added them later (on the photo from 1960s is viaduct Peračica):


http://dar-radovljica.si/g4)%20Viadu...r%20Ljubno.pdf
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Old May 25th, 2016, 06:31 PM   #1392
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Originally Posted by keber View Post
Road Ljubljana-Vrhnika was built in 1947 and continuation to Planina (close to previous YU-I border) was finished in 1954.

I looked to Google and found my own post about that
I don't know how the central committee of communist party approved that (Joke.) I mean, to build the connection with Italy instead of first 20 kilometers of Brotherhood and Unity highway from Škofljica to Ivančna Gorica (Another joke.)
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Old May 25th, 2016, 07:18 PM   #1393
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Autoput (highway) Ljubljana - Zagreb 1964.

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Old May 25th, 2016, 08:29 PM   #1394
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Notice how the Serbian word (autoput) was also used in SLO and HR instead of the current au/vtocesta.
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Old May 25th, 2016, 09:22 PM   #1395
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Quote:
Originally Posted by italystf View Post
So this is one of the rare pre-war concrete slabs roads still left in Europe.
That kind of pavement was also used on German Reichautobahnnen and early Italian 1+1 autostrade in the interbellum period.
Of course most of them don't exist anymore. I can only think of the Polish road 18/E36 and of the Russian road E28 in the Kaliningrad oblast, both parts of the Reichautobahn system.

DW142, part of the same corridor as mentioned E28 in Russia. There is also this road in Slovakia, which possibly has been constructed in the period, however I am not 100% sure. I remember a discussion related to that section, but can't remind its conclusion, I am afraid.
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Old May 25th, 2016, 10:27 PM   #1396
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DW142, part of the same corridor as mentioned E28 in Russia. There is also this road in Slovakia, which possibly has been constructed in the period, however I am not 100% sure. I remember a discussion related to that section, but can't remind its conclusion, I am afraid.
It was the Reichautobahn Berlin-Koenigsberg, that was supposed to connect Eastern Prussia with the rest of Germany, across the Polish corridor (Gdynia, Poland) and the (then independent) Free City of Danzig. The supposed necessity of having a territorial contiguity of Germany was one of the pretexts used by Hitler for the well-known tragic events that followed September 1st, 1939. Before the war, an extraterritorial motorway and railway corridor across Poland and Danzig was proposed by Nazi Germany.
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“The transponder’s personalised signal would be picked up when the car passed through an intersection, and then relayed to a central computer which would calculate the charge according to the intersection and the time of day and add it to the car’s bill” - Nobel Economics Prize winner William Vickrey, proposing a system of electronic tolling for the Washington metropolitan area, 1959
In real life, electronic toll collection was first introduced in Bergen, Norway in 1986, and well into the 21th century many countries still struggle to implement it.

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Old May 25th, 2016, 10:29 PM   #1397
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Quote:
Originally Posted by italystf View Post
So this is one of the rare pre-war concrete slabs roads still left in Europe.
That kind of pavement was also used on German Reichautobahnnen and early Italian 1+1 autostrade in the interbellum period.
Of course most of them don't exist anymore. I can only think of the Polish road 18/E36 and of the Russian road E28 in the Kaliningrad oblast, both parts of the Reichautobahn system.
There is only one short stretch in Germany which still has the original concrete slabs of the 3rd Reich era in place.
The former GDR didn't place emphasis on maintenance and so large parts of the FRG A11 were still original concrete slabs from that period of time.
Until 2007 there where many sections with a horrible road condition, although they replaced large parts from 1996 onwards.

E.g. taken from Wikipedia (Penkun, Dec 2006 before total replacement):


Today there are only 4km near the border which are still a original Reichsautobahn. So you might enjoy this short video.
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Old May 25th, 2016, 10:54 PM   #1398
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Originally Posted by italystf View Post
It was the Reichautobahn Berlin-Koenigsberg, that was supposed to connect Eastern Prussia with the rest of Germany, across the Polish corridor (Gdynia, Poland) and the (then independent) Free City of Danzig. The supposed necessity of having a territorial contiguity of Germany was one of the pretexts used by Hitler for the well-known tragic events that followed September 1st, 1939. Before the war, an extraterritorial motorway and railway corridor across Poland and Danzig was proposed by Nazi Germany.
Yes. We call it "Berlinka" now.
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Old May 25th, 2016, 11:17 PM   #1399
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Originally Posted by italystf View Post
Notice how the Serbian word (autoput) was also used in SLO and HR instead of the current au/vtocesta.
The autoput sign is in Croatia, in Slovenia you can see signs with autocesta and avtocesta.
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Old May 26th, 2016, 12:01 AM   #1400
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Quote:
Originally Posted by piotr71 View Post

DW142, part of the same corridor as mentioned E28 in Russia. There is also this road in Slovakia, which possibly has been constructed in the period, however I am not 100% sure. I remember a discussion related to that section, but can't remind its conclusion, I am afraid.
AFAIK concrete pavement road Ia/65 in Slovakia isn´t too old, it was build for heavy tanks, because the T-72s were made in ZŤS Martin (Závody Ťažkého Strojárstva - Heavy Machinery Factory), and that road was kind of polygon. For me it´s currently the worst and most dangerous road in Slovakia, locals call it Tankodrom. Especially rendezvous with full concrete slabs sticking out couple of inches out of the surface can be fatal.
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