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Old January 4th, 2017, 05:50 PM   #1601
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Corvinus View Post
"Petrol station - 500m" sign at a German autobahn, filmed in Summer 1937. Unfortunately, no location given.
From: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1qIq2oN0j70
So, they're obviusly driving from Cologne to Dusseldorf. I find it quite interesting because I live nerby that area.
There are two motorways between Cologne and Dusseldorf, A59 did not exist back then. The section of A3 near to Opladen was opened in 1933, as the third motorway in Germany (after the AVUS and the Cologne - Bonn motorway, current A555). It was a very short section, actually an Opladen bypass. Most probably that's why it was filmed twice (the overpass at 5:26 is obviously the same as the one at 5:46).
Both ends of that short motorway were at the current crossings of B8 so that the way on to Dusseldorf was B8 northbound.
However, that 17 km distance is very interesting. Along B8 17 km is somewhere in Benrath and Holthausen. Both Benrath and Holthausen became part of Dusseldorf in 1929 so measuring distance up to that makes no sense.
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Old January 5th, 2017, 12:50 PM   #1602
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Something interesting:

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Originally Posted by vinterriket View Post
Efectul autostrazilor urbane: Cincinnati, USA

Although we (users of SSC) are very pro-new motorways, I do not find this very 'healthy' for a city.
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Old January 5th, 2017, 11:31 PM   #1603
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I don't know what about the other SSC sections, but in the Polish section we are absolutely against motorways, big roads and increasing car traffic in city centres.

New highways - yes, but as bypass roads and roads connecting cities.
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Old January 6th, 2017, 04:43 AM   #1604
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Yea American cities were destroyed by the interstate. A whole lot of other issues along with interstates led to the decline of American city cores.. but it contributed. The crazy thing is that image of cleveland isn't unusual, it is the standard for almost every American city. The few that were largely missed are the few cities today that are revered and actually still contain a significant amount of historic urban fabric (NYC, Boston, San Fransisco).. The US is "older" than most people realize, its just that a ton of that history was demolished to put up freeway interchanges
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Old January 6th, 2017, 11:17 PM   #1605
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Google Earth published now satellite images from Central Europe starting in 1984 It is in very bad resolution but it is understandable according to the geopolitical situation. Anyway you can e.g. track changes on Hungarian M1 motorway ;-)
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Old January 7th, 2017, 12:47 AM   #1606
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M6 motorway in Chelshire, UK in 1969



3 lanes + hard shoulders for each direction weren't standard in most countries in the 1960s.
If it was not for the vintage vehicles and for the lack of crashbarriers, this photo would looks like from today.
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In real life, electronic toll collection was first introduced in Bergen, Norway in 1986, and well into the 21th century many countries still struggle to implement it.

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Old January 9th, 2017, 05:16 PM   #1607
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Quote:
Originally Posted by italystf View Post
M6 motorway in Chelshire, UK in 1969
[...]
Today (or 2012 due to trucks blocking the current street view):
https://goo.gl/maps/JbpW73UzouL2
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Old January 11th, 2017, 01:11 AM   #1608
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Originally Posted by volodaaaa View Post
Google Earth published now satellite images from Central Europe starting in 1984 It is in very bad resolution but it is understandable according to the geopolitical situation. Anyway you can e.g. track changes on Hungarian M1 motorway ;-)
The Balkans are covered also, every capital for sure I have checked already. But the resolution is very very bad, you could barely see anything.
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Old January 11th, 2017, 10:45 AM   #1609
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The entire world has such imagery dating back to 1984.
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Old January 12th, 2017, 03:30 PM   #1610
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i didn't said it does not. What I said is that the Balkans are covered also. And I knew this a few years ago.
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Old January 21st, 2017, 07:43 PM   #1611
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Poland: construction of the East-West Route in Lublin (around 1970):

Quote:
Originally Posted by Strzala View Post
Budowa trasy W-Z w Lublinie:
Quote:




Na potrzeby budowy trasy W-Z z ulicy Lubartowskiej zniknęły dwie kamienice:


Foto: Marian Budzyński były pracownik Miejskiego Zarządu Dróg Mostów i Zieleni przy Prezydium Miejskiej Rady Narodowej w Lublinie.

http://www.dziennikwschodni.pl/lubli...000193102.html
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Old January 21st, 2017, 08:33 PM   #1612
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interesting photos

"30 lecie PRL"
It is somewhat interesting that one doesn't seem to see much celebration of PRL-era on road names today. I guess they were all renamed after AK or Jana Pawel II shortly after 1989

I imagine the damaged buildings are also showing their "30th anniversary" in the image...
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Old January 22nd, 2017, 01:55 AM   #1613
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Yes, they were renamed, often by events or people talking about was forbidden in the PRL times. Or just the names from before the WW2 were restored.

See this Wikipedia site for the city of Łódź: https://pl.wikipedia.org/wiki/Zmiany...w_w_Łodzi

Especially at the two leftmost columns. The leftmost one - the current name, the next one - the PRL name. The third one is the Nazi name from the times of the Nazi Germany occupation of the city during the WW2.

It's not only about the streets named by anniversaries etc., but also by communist "heroes" who actually did more evil than good.

From more important streets in Łódź:
- aleja Armii Czerwonej (Red Army Avenue) renamed to Aleja Piłsudskiego (Piłsudski Avenue); he is the most important person thanks to which Poland was resurrected after the WW1, after 123 years of non-existence on the map
- ulica Fornalskiej (Fornalska Street - Małgorzata Fornalska was a communist activist) renamed to ulica Wileńska (Vilnius Street), which is the pre-WW2 name
- ulica Świerczewskiego (Świerczewski Street - Karol Świerczewski was a Polish general in the Soviet and Polish communist army) renamed to ulica Radwańska (Radwańska street), again the pre-WW2 name
- ulica Armii Ludowej (People's Army Street - which was a Polish army organized by the Soviets during the WW2) renamed to ulica Polskiej Organizacji Wojskowej (Polish Military Organization Street), it was a Polish military organization (as the name suggests) during the WW1, organized by Piłsudski, the members of which were oppressed, arrested and murdered in the USSR (since it fought against the USSR too) - I suppose it had to be a taboo topic in the PRL
- ulica 22 Lipca (22 July Street, 22 July 1945 was the official date of the "liberation" of Poland after the WW2 and this date was celebrated as a national holiday in the PRL times) renamed to ulica 6 Sierpnia (6 August street)
- ulica Gagarina (Gagarin Street - so named by the first man in the space) renamed to ulica Paderewskiego (Paderewski Street) - by a name of a Polish world class pianist and composer (and also politician) from the between-war times; in this case I don't really understand this change, we have streets named by foreign writers, so why not by a foreign astronaut? but maybe it's because astronauts are military people and we didn't want a main street named by a foreign soldier who didn't do anything good for us
- not mentioned there - a street named ulica Główna (Main Street) up to 1945, then renamed to ulica Stalina (Stalin Street), in 1956 renamed back to Główna (Main Street), in 1979 renamed to ulica Mickiewicza (Mickiewicz street - by the most prominent Polish poet, who lived in the 19th century) and a part of it renamed in 1990 to ulica Piłsudskiego (Piłsudski street) together with the Red Army Street, mentioned before

The current government wants to "decommunize" all the streets in Poland that still have "communist" names. Some people are having fun of it, saying that they will have to change the names of the "ulica Dworcowa" streets, which is quite a popular street name in Polish towns. It means "Railway Station Street", "Bahnhofstraße" (the German equivalent sounds better than the English one, which doesn't really seem to be used anywhere), but it can be also understood as "Dvortsov Street" and... there actually was a soviet writer whose name was Dvortsov.

By the way, an interesting thing is that the deadline for all the infrastructure investments in the PRL times was 22 July. So sometimes, when the deadline couldn't really be kept, something had to be improvised for the opening - or the construction was finished, but the quality was not such as it should be.

Currently, at least in Łódź, the local politicians still like to rename even fragments of existing streets by people they want to commemorate - even if there is not much reason for that. And often by dividing existing streets into fragments with different names. Fortunately, we don't have a Lech Kaczyński street in Łódź (it's the president of Poland who died tragically in the plane crash near Smolensk in 2010 - he, basically, didn't do anything special as a president) - although many cities already do.

But, for example, there was Sporna street in Łódź: https://goo.gl/maps/SQCiridPoGC2
A bit weird street, because at one point it ramified into two branches: one towards Palki street (I am not sure if it wasn't still Strykowska street in that time - it's another example of the same procedure) and one towards Źródłowa street. I understand that someone may have wanted to change its name, because it meant "Dispute Street", which is not really a nice name for a street. Even though the ulica Smutna, Sad Street, located not far away, doesn't have such problems... But maybe its name makes some sense, as there is a graveyard, a prison and a driving license examination centre in it (the last one known for one of the lowest passed exam rates in Poland).

Someone decided that the section of this street from Wojska Polskiego street to the south - but only the branch towards Palki street - will be renamed into ulica Pankiewicza (Pankiewicz Street), by a local priest killed by Germans in a concentration camp during the WW2 (again a street name given to someone only because of his tragic death...). So now we have two sections of Sporna street separated by Pankiewicza street.

But it's not everything. In the section of the street renamed to Pankiewicza there is a children hospital, commonly known in the city as the "hospital in the Sporna street". It has a name (it's named by Maria Konopnicka - a writer who wrote books and stories for children) but it's practically not known under it, but just by the street name. The hospital decided not to change its address and leave the Sporna street there - they claimed it's better to spend money on treatment of the children than on unnecessary administrative changes. So now we have two section of Sporna street separated by Pankiewicza street and a hospital having Sporna street in its popular name and in its address, located in the part of the street which was renamed.
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Old January 22nd, 2017, 02:36 AM   #1614
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Actually, "Station Street" or "Depot Street" or "Railway Street" are VERY common throughout the English-speaking world. The major cities tend to be exceptions, though. In their cases, the station is sometimes named after the street that its on, such as La Salle Street Station in Chicago.
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Old January 22nd, 2017, 02:07 PM   #1615
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So it's probably the same in any other country which has railways
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Old January 22nd, 2017, 03:10 PM   #1616
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Kpc21 View Post
Yes, they were renamed, often by events or people talking about was forbidden in the PRL times. Or just the names from before the WW2 were restored.
Same happened in Hungarian cities, of course, with all those street names after Hungarian and international communist "personalities".

Paper maps of Budapest from before 1989 are basically useless to find your way today (especially the street name index).
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Old January 22nd, 2017, 03:41 PM   #1617
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In Polish cities it's not that bad - although you may have difficulty using an old map.

And there are still some people, especially older ones, still using the old names.

Asking someone how to find the street you know by the old "communist" name will definitely help. Many people know them and there are still used by some elder people.

And some changes were done much later than in 1990. In Łódź, we have the Solidarity Roundabout - which got this name in 2005. Before, it was named Waryński Roundabout. Ludwik Waryński was a Polish socialist from the 19th century - so he had nothing to do with the Soviet Union and the PRL (and the capitalism in those times was so bad for the workers and so good for the owners of factories that the ideas of socialism and communism weren't considered bad). And he still has his street in the city.

Or part (more or less a half) of the Aleja Włókniarzy (Textile Workers Avenue) renamed to Aleja Jana Pawła II (John Paul II Avenue) in 2005. There are still many people who don't even know about the name change and know it as Aleja Włókniarzy - as it's a big street, but playing a role of a bypass of the city centre, without any major institutions. As opposed to Rondo Solidarności, being an important street intersection and public transport interchange stop.
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Old January 22nd, 2017, 09:29 PM   #1618
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Corvinus View Post
Same happened in Hungarian cities, of course, with all those street names after Hungarian and international communist "personalities".

Paper maps of Budapest from before 1989 are basically useless to find your way today (especially the street name index).
In Slovakia we, in turn, renamed original Hungarian cities and municipalities. Therefore the cities in mixed areas with Hungarian majority got names after most important Slovak intelligent representatives. Crazy.
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Old January 22nd, 2017, 09:48 PM   #1619
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Poland,

Gliwice Sośnica interchange area. History 2002-2016 (Google Earth) :


Year 2002



Year 2009



Year 2012



Year 2016



Location : https://www.google.pl/maps/@50.27002.../data=!3m1!1e3
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Old January 23rd, 2017, 01:06 AM   #1620
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In Slovakia we, in turn, renamed original Hungarian cities and municipalities. Therefore the cities in mixed areas with Hungarian majority got names after most important Slovak intelligent representatives. Crazy.
In Poland, after the WW2, the names of some formerly German towns were sometimes changed to newly invented ones. But there is very few of them.

In most cases the old Polish names were simply restored (they often had two names: a German one and a Polish one, sometimes similar in their meaning or how they sound, sometimes different) or the German names were polonized.

We have a touristic mountain town called Karpacz (the German name is Krummhübel - Leaning Mountain in old German; the Polish name was invented by one of the dwellers who was from the Carpathians and named it by that mountain range - Karpacz is in the Sudetes). One of its districts - formerly Brückenberg (Bridge Mountain in modern German) was named Bierutowice by the Polish president from that time. As he was a communist and what he was mainly doing was following Stalin's orders, this name should have already been changed already a long time ago. And there exists a new name, used by many - Karpacz Górny, the Upper Karpacz. But it's still unofficial. The local authorities are so inefficient with this that the name change takes so much time.

On the other hand, the city of Stargard, formerly Stargard Szczeciński, managed to change its name a year ago without any problems (although the change was initiated in 1999 and it was introduced with the beginning of 2015 - so it took much time anyway). They didn't want to be named by a near bigger city (Szczecin, Stettin in German), they preferred to be just Stargard and not Stargard Szczeciński.

Another interesting case is the city of Katowice, the name of which was Stalinogród between 1953 and 1956. Introduced after the death of Stalin, but quickly restored back to Katowice.

Or the city of Kaliningrad in Russia, which used to be German (Teutonic or Prussian) and Polish in different periods in the past. In German it was called Königsberg, in Polish Królewiec, both names meaning basically the same (King's Town). Russians named it by a soviet politician Mikhail Kalinin - and it is so until now.

But the Germans occupying Poland during the WW2 (I suppose it was the same in other countries) were most crazy with that. In big cities, they changed all the street names to their owns, meaning totally different things than the Polish ones. And also changed some city names (although often they just adjusted them to the German pronunciation) - Łódź became Litzmanstadt, by Karl Litzmann, a nazi politician.
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