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Old January 19th, 2008, 06:25 PM   #1
Trae
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HOUSTON | Ritz Carlton | 66 fl | Canceled

First look at the proposed Ritz Carlton for BLVD Place





More at: http://swamplot.com/a-first-look-at-the-ri...1-16/#more-1011

This will be built in Uptown Houston. It is being built in a new development called "BLVD Place". Some renderings for that here (please note that those three glass buildings are not the actual design. The Ritz would be the one in the middle):
















The strip center in front of the development (across the street) will be the next to go.

Last edited by desertpunk; July 30th, 2012 at 11:01 AM.
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Old January 19th, 2008, 07:35 PM   #2
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Site demolition:











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Old January 19th, 2008, 07:59 PM   #3
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If Dallas has a Ritz, Houston has to have one...or try, haha.
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Old January 19th, 2008, 08:19 PM   #4
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Dallasbrink View Post
If Dallas has a Ritz, Houston has to have one...or try, haha.

You did know Houston had a Ritz before it was changed to St. Regis, right?
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Old January 19th, 2008, 09:54 PM   #5
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Dallasbrink View Post
If Dallas has a Ritz, Houston has to have one...or try, haha.
Houston had a Ritz before Dallas, but bad management had them leave and it was changed to a St. Regis (basically the same). Houston's location wasn't along in the closing. Many Ritz across the nation changed into other hotel brands.

By the way, Houston's RITZ will be larger than both of Dallas' RITZ stacked on top of each other.

Last edited by Trae; January 19th, 2008 at 10:00 PM.
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Old January 20th, 2008, 02:39 PM   #6
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Quote:
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This is the saddest picture of a city I have ever seen. How can any city with this amount of open space even survive?
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Old January 20th, 2008, 04:49 PM   #7
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How can it not survive? There is nothing wrong with that picture. That's not even Downtown Houston. The Inner Loop of Houston has 600,000 (and growing fast) in about 95 square miles. Outside the loop are the suburbs.

Those strip centers are all being redeveloped. It just takes time. This new development is just one of them. METRO is building a light rail line down the street (half will be in a subway), so it is looking good.
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Old January 20th, 2008, 05:11 PM   #8
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If you really think there is nothing wrong with that picture, I cannot help you. Take a look at any other city and you will find that it's not normal nor attractive to have such open spaces surrounded by towers. Towers need to be in urban areas surrounded by midrises in my opinion. Why don't they develop some lowrise houses in these areas?

Also, I never suggested this was downtown. I know (and like) downtown from the pictures I've seen, beautiful public spaces as well. However, it's a known fact that US cities like Houston (there are others) have way too much open space.


I cannot think of any city in The Netherlands that has such huge parking lots just outside the city. But I guess our struggle for space is something you don't have
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Old January 20th, 2008, 05:53 PM   #9
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That is probably why . The Netherlands is a small little country, so space is a big issue. Many American cities have a lot of space to build on. Houston is no different. Those parking lots are being redeveloped though (with transit coming in, etc.), so it won't be too bad.

Dense:
image hosted on flickr


Spread Out:

Last edited by Trae; January 20th, 2008 at 06:08 PM.
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Old January 20th, 2008, 06:52 PM   #10
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Quote:
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Dense:
image hosted on flickr


[/img]

Tragedy....
In comparison , picture from London Broadgate tower thread.This is how the city should look like.
image hosted on flickr

Last edited by Martineq; January 20th, 2008 at 11:32 PM.
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Old January 20th, 2008, 08:39 PM   #11
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Quote:
Originally Posted by SkyBridge View Post
This is the saddest picture of a city I have ever seen. How can any city with this amount of open space even survive?
well, to be fair...it's survival is a lot more meager than many other cities that are planned more efficiently...so you pay for what you build. it seems that many americans are brainwashed to not mind living in low-density, high-consumption neighbourhoods, so of course this stuff will happen. it will probably take a few generations to undo the 20th-century influences on lifestyle, but it will happen eventually, we all hope.
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Old January 21st, 2008, 12:45 AM   #12
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Trae View Post
Houston had a Ritz before Dallas, but bad management had them leave and it was changed to a St. Regis (basically the same). Houston's location wasn't along in the closing. Many Ritz across the nation changed into other hotel brands.

By the way, Houston's RITZ will be larger than both of Dallas' RITZ stacked on top of each other.
i know. We couldn't make ours that tall due to FAA regulations on the
Dallas Sky line do to Love Fields flight path being right over Down Town Dallas.
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Old January 21st, 2008, 01:33 AM   #13
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Quote:
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Tragedy....
In comparison , picture from London Broadgate tower thread.This is how the city should look like.
No it isn't. Not many cities in America look like that. That is your opinion on what a "city" should look like. I hope you realize how much older London is compared to Houston. Houston was founded in 1836, with less than 200 people, or so.
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Old January 21st, 2008, 01:50 AM   #14
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^ Has more to do with city planning than with history IMO. Luckily ideas on this are turning around, and we're seeing more and more cities becoming healthy.
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Old January 21st, 2008, 02:05 AM   #15
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Planning was good for Houston until oil was discovered not too far from it. Then, oil companies came in and ripped up all of the streetcar lines (that were heavily used). There was even a commuter rail line pre-1950, that went from Houston to Galveston. Houston is gaining it all back, and pretty quickly, too.
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Old January 21st, 2008, 02:21 AM   #16
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Quote:
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^ Has more to do with city planning than with history IMO.
City planning and history go hand in hand.
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Old January 21st, 2008, 02:21 AM   #17
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Quote:
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City planning and history go hand in hand.
True statement.
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Old January 21st, 2008, 03:31 AM   #18
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Martineq View Post

Tragedy....
In comparison , picture from London Broadgate tower thread.This is how the city should look like.
image hosted on flickr
You have done a comparison between two pictures that are not compatible. apart from the fact that I find much more attractive a city like huston (looking at the pictures, where the highth of buildings varies rather than the tipical boring all-the-same-highth buildings . just in the last decade has london started to actually build skyscrapers (that are the most space-efficent buildings), "only" a century after United States.

And, living all my life in Rome, I can defenetly state that city planning and history do go hand in hand, and the terrible city outskirts that are rising in most of european cities really explains how "capable" we are of planning a city in the 21st century. Embarrassing.

And if a country has so much space, why should it spend more money in taller buildings if it can expand. Europe can't do that anymore, its time has passed, but that doesn't mean that other city-tipes are wrong. And you don't see it only in the US. Look at Canada, Australia, Cina (the modern cities) south africa and many south american cities.

As a last note, I prefer living in a city full of trees like huston than in one like Rome (that for european standards has a lot of trees) where the parks can be counted on the fingers of one hand.
And there are still people that wonder about pollution.

Just try to open your vision and you might see there are other possibilities other than our old, polluted continent, and discover there is something more in a country more than what you read on news papers or see on television.
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Old January 21st, 2008, 05:46 AM   #19
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I cannot disagree more The entire concept of a 'city' is clustering residences, offices and leisure in an area as small as possible. The most succeful and liveable cities in the world are not Houston, Los Angeles and Dallas but the most dense ones - Amsterdam, New York, London, Paris, Tokyo, Hong Kong, etc.

Also, pollution has NOTHING to do with density. Spreading out cities with suburbs only increases traffic - this is a proven fact.
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Old January 21st, 2008, 05:59 AM   #20
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Quote:
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I cannot disagree more The entire concept of a 'city' is clustering residences, offices and leisure in an area as small as possible. The most succeful and liveable cities in the world are not Houston, Los Angeles and Dallas but the most dense ones - Amsterdam, New York, London, Paris, Tokyo, Hong Kong, etc.

Also, pollution has NOTHING to do with density. Spreading out cities with suburbs only increases traffic - this is a proven fact.
Yeah right. Houston, Dallas, and Los Angeles are all examples of successful cities. Just because all of them aren't built like NYC, doesn't mean they aren't liveable/successful.
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