daily menu » rate the banner | guess the city | one on oneforums map | privacy policy (aug.2, 2013) | DMCA policy | flipboard magazine

Go Back   SkyscraperCity > World Forums > Architecture

Architecture news and discussions on all buildings types and urban spaces
» classic architecture | european classic architecture and landscapes | public space | shopping architecture | design & lifestyle | urban renewal and redevelopment



Reply

 
Thread Tools
Old January 30th, 2008, 09:00 AM   #1
hkskyline
Hong Kong
 
hkskyline's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2002
Posts: 74,468
Likes (Received): 5538

The Statues of Paris

Paris is a land of architectural details. You see them everywhere on the streets. Here is a compilation of The Statues of Paris.

First stop : Musee d'Orsay :









Here are a few more outside a government building :





... and on public infrastructure :





... and in public spaces :





















... and obviously in the Louvre as well!












__________________
Hong Kong Photo Gallery - Click Here for the Hong Kong Galleries

World Photo Gallery - | St. Petersburg | Moscow | Istanbul | Dubai | Shanghai | Sydney | Hanoi | Bangkok | Prague

New York, London, Seoul, Taipei, Mumbai, Tokyo, Iceland, Rocky Mountains, Angkor Wat, and much more!
hkskyline no está en línea   Reply With Quote

Sponsored Links
 
Old February 2nd, 2008, 10:25 PM   #2
Amrafel
Higher, better
 
Amrafel's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2006
Location: Bratislava, Slovakia/Portsmouth, UK
Posts: 4,850
Likes (Received): 1107

great photos, but most beautiful statue of Louvre isnt here



__________________
VISIT BEAUTY ON DANUBE - BRATISLAVA!

projects & photos & history
Amrafel no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old February 26th, 2008, 04:00 AM   #3
hkskyline
Hong Kong
 
hkskyline's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2002
Posts: 74,468
Likes (Received): 5538

Don't touch the art? Louvre exhibit lets visitors break the rules
20 February 2008

PARIS (AP) - Signs throughout the Louvre ask visitors to keep their hands off the art. But one special sculpture gallery invites art lovers to indulge.

The Louvre's Tactile Gallery, targeted to the blind and visually impaired, is the only space in the Paris museum where visitors can touch the sculptures, with no guards or alarms to stop them. Its latest exhibit is a crowd pleaser: a menagerie of sculpted lions, snakes, horses and eagles.

The 15 bronze, plaster and terra cotta animals are reproductions of famous works found elsewhere in the Louvre. Called "Animals, Symbols of Power," the exhibit focuses on animals that were used by kings, emperors and pharaohs throughout history to symbolize the greatness of their reigns.

Though the gallery was conceived for the blind and visually impaired, children and other visitors also enjoy it. During guided tours on the weekends, children can explore the art with blindfolds on.

The Louvre opened the Tactile Gallery in 1995. Though other French cultural exhibits offer periodic events and programs for the blind, the Louvre says it is the only museum in France with a gallery specifically for the visually impaired. Elsewhere in Europe -- Ancona, Italy, and Athens, Greece -- also have entire tactile museums.

"There's really a way to learn how to touch, with habits to learn," said Cyrille Gouyette, the co-head of the Louvre's gallery. Some people run their hands over the works, he said, and some even knock on them to understand what material they're made of.

He said the exhibit on animals strives to "use the sense of touch to make people think."

The exhibit displays statues of Charlemagne and French King Louis XIV astride their horses -- a pose that raised the rulers up off the ground and made them look more imposing. It also features a reproduction of a Napoleonic eagle. Napoleon chose the eagle as an insignia because he was inspired by ancient Rome's use of the bird as a sign of its military might.

The exhibit, which opened in December, is scheduled to run for about three years. First-time visitor Didier Roule, who was accompanied by his seeing-eye dog, said the visually impaired "are certainly more attentive to some details ... and we can feel things through the materials."

Roule, a sculptor himself, said he plans to return. "The exhibit gives me ideas," he said.
__________________
Hong Kong Photo Gallery - Click Here for the Hong Kong Galleries

World Photo Gallery - | St. Petersburg | Moscow | Istanbul | Dubai | Shanghai | Sydney | Hanoi | Bangkok | Prague

New York, London, Seoul, Taipei, Mumbai, Tokyo, Iceland, Rocky Mountains, Angkor Wat, and much more!
hkskyline no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old March 13th, 2008, 01:36 AM   #4
rover3
BANNED
 
Join Date: Feb 2008
Posts: 562
Likes (Received): 2

Am looking for those 5 black-bronze statues of 5 seated female figures representing the continents, located just outside the entrance of the d'Orsay.

Maybe someone could post that? I just adore those 5 figures.
rover3 no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old March 15th, 2008, 05:29 PM   #5
ParisianStyle
Registered User
 
ParisianStyle's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2007
Location: Paris, Marseille, Rotterdam
Posts: 459
Likes (Received): 6

__________________
I Love Paris
ParisianStyle no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old July 23rd, 2008, 07:37 AM   #6
hkskyline
Hong Kong
 
hkskyline's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2002
Posts: 74,468
Likes (Received): 5538

French pair raising money for Princess Diana statue in Paris
28 August 2007

PARIS (AP) - A golden statue of a flickering flame is where Princess Diana's fans pay her homage in Paris, leaving behind poems and prayers even now, 10 years after she died nearby. A French child's collage proclaims her "unforgettable." An Italian fan scrawls, "I still love you."

But contrary to popular belief, the statue wasn't built for Diana, it was merely appropriated by her fans. With the 10th anniversary of her death coming up Friday, a few fans say it's time she had a Paris monument in her honor -- something permanent, unlike the memorabilia swept away regularly by trash collectors -- and they have begun a fundraising drive.

Dominique de Fontenay says he thinks about Diana's death every day as he passes through the Pont d'Alma traffic tunnel where she died, and he is always struck by the lack of a Diana monument.

"That seems shocking and flagrant given Diana's notoriety and the love that most people all over the world felt for her," said de Fontenay, a 34-year-old event planner who conceived the project.

De Fontenay teamed up with a jeweler and sculptor, Xavier de Fraissinette, who sketched out ideas for a bronze statue of a suit-clad Diana reaching out to a small child holding a bouquet.

"The hardest thing will be getting her expression, her smile, her face right," said de Fraissinette, who designed a sculpture for the Lyon, France, meeting of the Group of Seven industrialized nations in 1996. "It must not be a mortuary monument, she must be natural."

After a few mentions in the local press, about 150 people have donated a total of euro7,000 (US$9,500), the two said. Building the statue will require euro150,000 (US$240,000), said de Fontenay, a Diana fan who remembers joining up with crowds to mourn the princess after the Aug. 31, 1997, crash that killed her, her boyfriend Dodi Fayed and their chauffeur, Henri Paul.

"I think everyone on the planet who had a heart was depressed that day, or at least filled with a great sadness," said de Fontenay, who named his cat "Princess" in Diana's honor.

De Fontenay and de Fraissinette are in the early stages and do not have approval from Paris City Hall, where the press office said officials were not aware of their campaign. The process could be long, and they will need approval from the city council.

For now, the torch statue near the traffic tunnel remains the de facto memorial. A replica of the Statue of Liberty's torch, it was donated in 1987 by the International Herald Tribune newspaper as a symbol of French-American friendship.

Ten years later, mourners turned the torch into a Diana shrine, which seemed fitting because Elton John sang "Candle in the Wind" at her funeral in London's Westminster Abbey.

On any given afternoon, dozens of tourists crowd around the torch, snapping pictures and leaving behind cellophane-wrapped roses. After posing for a snapshot, 29-year-old Londoner Arijit Ray said he wished de Fontenay and de Fraissinette luck. "There should be a statue," he said.

De Fontenay already has a spot picked out -- a grassy garden right above the tunnel where the crash took place.

"It's all ready. There are flowers. All that's missing is Diana," he said.
__________________
Hong Kong Photo Gallery - Click Here for the Hong Kong Galleries

World Photo Gallery - | St. Petersburg | Moscow | Istanbul | Dubai | Shanghai | Sydney | Hanoi | Bangkok | Prague

New York, London, Seoul, Taipei, Mumbai, Tokyo, Iceland, Rocky Mountains, Angkor Wat, and much more!
hkskyline no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old August 22nd, 2008, 03:17 AM   #7
rockin'.baltimorean
Registered User
 
rockin'.baltimorean's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2008
Location: Owings Mills, Md. / Baltimore, Md.
Posts: 5,658
Likes (Received): 336

Quote:
Originally Posted by hkskyline View Post
[size=3]
don't care for this one too much....
__________________
B'more Birds' Nest..........Go Orioles!!!! Go Ravens!!!!
rockin'.baltimorean no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old August 25th, 2008, 02:02 AM   #8
Rapid
Skybar Posts: 24,564
 
Rapid's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2004
Location: Toronto
Posts: 996
Likes (Received): 2

man, that one is awesome!
Rapid no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old December 19th, 2008, 07:43 AM   #9
hkskyline
Hong Kong
 
hkskyline's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2002
Posts: 74,468
Likes (Received): 5538

Easter Island statue on a pilgrimage to Paris
16 December 2008
The Independent

An unusually large tourist will visit Paris in 2010. One of the vast statues of elongated human heads and torsos from Easter Island in the Pacific has "expressed the wish" to visit the French capital to preach - silently - against Western materialism.

The statue has let it be known to the island's leaders that it wanted to make the pilgrimage, the French newspaper Le Figaro reported yesterday. Two islanders, including the governor's nephew, have made a preparatory visit and concluded that one of the statues or moais, which range up to 30ft high and 90 tons in weight, should stand in the middle of the Tuileries gardens, halfway between the Louvre and the Place de la Concorde.

"Everyone on the island knows that a moai is going to Paris," Edgard Hedreveri, the Easter Island tourism director, told Le Figaro. "It is going to find a platform in Paris to spread spiritual energy which will change the conscience of humanity. It is going to transform the materialistic conscience of the world into something more humane."

The nearly 10,000-mile journey to Paris from Easter Island in the Pacific Ocean, the world's most isolated inhabited island, will be organised by an Italian foundation. The cost of the anti-materialist pilgrimage will be covered - somewhat inappropriately - by the French luxury goods company Louis Vuitton Moët Hennessy (LVMH). There are almost 900 Easter Island statues, carved from compressed volcanic ash between 400 AD and the early 1700s. Although other statues have been stolen or removed to museums, this will be the first time one has been sent on a spiritual journey by the island's government.

Mr Hereveri said the disappearance of the original Easter Island culture, possibly as a result of a man-made ecological calamity, had universal lessons for the planet. "A moai is not just a lump of stone," he said. "It's a connection [with the past]. We will show the world that, by destroying nature, mankind destroys itself. The history of Easter Island is the history of humanity."

He and another island delegate, Pedro Edmonds Paoa, nephew of the governor, toured Paris this year. "With the help of our ancestors, we were searching for the right place for the moai," M. Hereveri said. "In the Tuileries, I knew this was the spot where it [the statue] wanted to stand. A strong current of energy passes through that place."

The particular moai has not yet been chosen by the island's 4,900 inhabitants. It will make the journey to France by sea, then, probably, up the river Seine by barge. Mystery still surrounds the Easter Island statues and the reasons for the disappearance of the elaborate culture which produced them. One theory is that the island's forests were destroyed to create wooden sledges to haul the statues more than 10 miles from volcanic hills to the shore. The resulting ecological calamity produced a revolt and many of the statues were pushed over or destroyed.

Research at an exhibition in Paris (open until March) presents a different story. The Easter Islanders were a "great people" who fell victim to a drought in the southern hemisphere halfway through the 17th century, say the French archaeologists Michel and Catherine Orliac.
__________________
Hong Kong Photo Gallery - Click Here for the Hong Kong Galleries

World Photo Gallery - | St. Petersburg | Moscow | Istanbul | Dubai | Shanghai | Sydney | Hanoi | Bangkok | Prague

New York, London, Seoul, Taipei, Mumbai, Tokyo, Iceland, Rocky Mountains, Angkor Wat, and much more!
hkskyline no está en línea   Reply With Quote


Reply

Thread Tools

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off



All times are GMT +2. The time now is 05:55 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 1
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
Feedback Buttons provided by Advanced Post Thanks / Like v3.2.5 (Pro) - vBulletin Mods & Addons Copyright © 2014 DragonByte Technologies Ltd.

vBulletin Optimisation provided by vB Optimise (Pro) - vBulletin Mods & Addons Copyright © 2014 DragonByte Technologies Ltd.

SkyscraperCity ☆ In Urbanity We trust ☆ about us | privacy policy | DMCA policy

Hosted by Blacksun, dedicated to this site too!
Forum server management by DaiTengu