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Old January 31st, 2008, 08:36 AM   #1
Manila-X
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WORLD | Freight Railway

One thing I noticed with North America especially The US, Canada and Mexico are their extensive freight rail networks. Its more common to see freight trains in the US compared to commuter ones especially in The West Coast and the Midwest.

Just wondering how bout in Europe, Asia, Oceana or South America? Are there any extensive freight networks? Any picture of freight trains used there?

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Old January 31st, 2008, 08:56 AM   #2
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Freight movement in East Asia is primarily export-oriented, which is heavily favoured to sea, which is why China has invested so much money on container ports in the Yangtze and Pearl River Deltas.
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Old January 31st, 2008, 11:28 AM   #3
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Railway density in EU

http://www.eurofound.europa.eu/areas...104&idDomain=9
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Old January 31st, 2008, 01:07 PM   #4
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In Europe freight trains have to share tracks with passengers, with very few exceptions.

Anyone know the traffic, in tonnes, on one of the principal railways in the USA? And especially on mountain lines?

For comparison, each railway crossing the Alps carry about 10 to 17 millions tonnes of goods a year (without counting the weight of waggons and engines), less than their parallel highways. For example, throught the Brenner (Germany-Austria-Italy) there are about 45 millions tonnes per year, 10 via railway and 35 via road.
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Old January 31st, 2008, 01:27 PM   #5
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Freight Rail in Africa

Transnet Freight Rail in South Africa accounts for 80% of freight by rail infrastructure in Africa... Here is a brief outline:

(formerly known as Spoornet) bases its core competency on the transportation of freight, containers and mainline passengers on rail.

Freight Rail is currently positioning itself to become a profitable and sustainable freight railway business, assisting in driving the competitiveness of the South African economy. It is made up of six businesses, namely:

- GFB Commercial
- COALlink
- Orex
- Luxrail
- Shosholoza Meyl
- Freight Rail International Joint Ventures

The company maintains an extensive rail network across South Africa that connects with other rail networks in the sub-Saharan region, with its rail infrastructure representing about 80% of Africa's total. The company is proud of its reputations for technological leadership beyond Africa as well as within Africa, where it is active in some 17 countries.
GFB Commercial

Known previously as General Freight Business, GFB Commercial is the largest of Freight Rail's business units, accounting for some 70% of its income and handling some 52% of its freight tonnage.

GFB Commercial manages the flow of material and information between suppliers and customers along sections of their supply chains. It strives to integrate the rail component of the supply chain with adjoining components in order to increase supply chain efficiency and reliability at the lowest-possible cost.
COALlink

Coal is a vital export commodity, generating billions of Rands in foreign exchange earnings for South Africa and rightfully deserving its pseudonym 'Black Gold'.

COALlink is a specialist business unit that provides world-class transport for South Africa's export coal from the Mpumalanga coalfields to the Richards Bay coal terminal. It is one of the world's most efficient bulk export logistic supply chains, and its steam-coal export tonnage is second only to Australia’s.
Orex

Orex is a Transnet Freight Rail specialist business unit dealing with the transport of iron ore over the 861km railway line from Sishen to Saldanha. Following the high demand for ore in the export markets, improvements to the line implemented since 1998 have resulted in the capacity of the Orex line being increased from 18 million tons a year to more than 22 million tons a year. A further expansion is now on the drawing board.

Rated in a recent benchmark study as 38% better than the next best-practice operator in its field, Orex is already achieving both its vision and its mission as an international leader in providing world-class, heavy-haul logistics solutions for a growing market.

Luxrail

Luxrail's primary focus is the operation of the world-famous Blue Train, which caters for a growing international tourist market. Some 250 000 travel agents, in 181 countries, voting for the World Travel Awards named the Blue Train the world's leading luxury train. Crossing South Africa's varied landscape along four routes, the train combines the comfort and luxury of a five-star hotel with unparalleled journeys. Luxrail also manages contracts with other luxury train operators using Freight Rail's infrastructure. These include Rovos Rail, which travels throughout Southern Africa and the Spier, which travels on the Western Cape wine routes.

Shosholoza Meyl

Previously known as Main Line Passenger Services, Shosholoza Meyl provides affordable inter-city passenger rail services to and from South African destinations including Johannesburg, Durban, Makhado, Polokwane, KomatiePoort, East London, Port Elizabeth, Bloemfontein, Kimberley and Cape Town.

Services also connect with other Southern African destinations in Zimbabwe, Mozambique and Swaziland.

Approximately four million passengers a year use Shosholoza Meyl services.
Freight Rail International Joint Ventures

Freight Rail plans to be a global leader in operations on the 1000 mm and 1067 mm (narrow gauge) rail networks of the world, especially in Africa.

Through its railway operations, Freight Rail hopes to become a significant global player in the provision of freight logistics solutions to its customers on the African continent and beyond. The International Joint Ventures (IJV) business is Freight Rail's vehicle for achieving this and other objectives outside the company's normal areas of activity. IJV is responsible for all Freight Rail activities outside South Africa as well as for all non-core activities and joint ventures within South Africa.
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Old January 31st, 2008, 01:33 PM   #6
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Freight Network in South Africa

This is by road,



This is by rail:

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Last edited by Caisson Boy; January 31st, 2008 at 01:47 PM.
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Old January 31st, 2008, 02:41 PM   #7
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As Coccodrillo said above Freight shares tracks normally with passenger traffic. There are quite a few sections of freight only, but these are normally just spurs to power station, factories and ports from the nearest shared traffic route.

Good place to start for info about the UK freight network is on the National Rail website: http://www.networkrail.co.uk/aspx/1530.aspx. You should be able to find maps as well - the uk is divided into various corridors regardless of type of traffic, so the RUS documents will show the volume of traffic and maps of the routes, you will need to decipher where the freight goes. Alternatively there's the individual freight operator's websites. EWS is the biggest at the moment.

UK freight tonnage was 43.7 billion gtkm (gross tonne kilometres) in 2003.
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Old January 31st, 2008, 05:10 PM   #8
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Australia.

Intermodal freight is moved between the major cites and ports, double stacked on some trains across the desert.

Coal is hauled to ports from parts of Queensland and New South of Wales. In Queensland this is often done with electric locomotives, but only with diesel in NSW.

The Pilbara region of Western Australia is the home to the heaviest trains in the world operated by BHP and Rio Tinto to bring iron ore from the mines to the coast.

Intermodal...
image hosted on flickr

- aupeter10000 on flickr.

BHP in the Pilbara...
image hosted on flickr

- 8888transportpix on flickr.
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Old January 31st, 2008, 08:36 PM   #9
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Some numbers:
Freight rail by billions of tonne-kilometers (2005)

Country Billion tonne-kilometres
United States 2717.51
China 2195.4
Russian Federation 1852.91
India 407.40
European Union 359.12
Canada 352.07
Ukraine 223.98
Brazil 221.60
Kazakhstan 171.86
South Africa 108.51
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Old January 31st, 2008, 09:32 PM   #10
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What happens in the EU? (+ CH&Norway) there's already an exceptional railway network, so why is most traffic diverted to the roads? or is it precisely because the EU also has an excellent highway network the reason for which there's not a higher percentage of goods moved on trains?
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Old February 2nd, 2008, 12:48 AM   #11
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^ I'm no expert, but I suppose it has something to do with the high population density in Europe, which I suppose results in relatively short freight distances, and I also suppose it has something to do with the abundance of major ports along the (long) European coast, which means that large shipments can be offloaded close to the final destination.
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Old February 2nd, 2008, 02:58 AM   #12
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Add the large amount of freight transported by barges along the major rivers as well.
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Old February 2nd, 2008, 04:41 AM   #13
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Here are some numbers for % modal split for freight transport (2005, maritime transport excluded, rounded):

entity rail/road/inland waterways/pipelines
EU 16.5/72.6/65.4/5.5
United States 65.6/51.2/11.1/23.3
Russia 56.4/5.9/2.6/35.1
Canada 61.6/17.9/5.5/22.5

shares for eu countries with the most of freight transport:
Germany 19.6/63.8/13.2/3.4
France 15.1/73.6/3.4/7.9
Spain 4.7/92.6/-/2.6
Poland 25.5/60.9/0.7/12.9
Italy 11.4/83.0/0.1/5.5
UK 11.4/82.9/0.1/5.6

US rail freight transport share is larger than any of EU country. For longer freight rail distances in Europe is a big problem with interoperability, different gauges, voltage systems, safety systems, clearance profiles, direction of running.. To get freight by rail from lisboa to moscow you need transfer good twice, change loco(s) at least 5 times, with weight and height restrictions as high as in weakest part of route. For same distance in US or Russia no transfers or engine changes needed, and that makes rail freight transport much more competitable with road freight transport.
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Old February 2nd, 2008, 04:50 AM   #14
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Japan's freight, at Hachinohe station:

image hosted on flickr
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Old February 2nd, 2008, 01:09 PM   #15
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jkjkjk View Post
US rail freight transport share is larger than any of EU country. For longer freight rail distances in Europe is a big problem with interoperability, different gauges, voltage systems, safety systems, clearance profiles, direction of running.. To get freight by rail from lisboa to moscow you need transfer good twice, change loco(s) at least 5 times, with weight and height restrictions as high as in weakest part of route. For same distance in US or Russia no transfers or engine changes needed, and that makes rail freight transport much more competitable with road freight transport.
Maybe it's time from the Comission to do something about this and start forcing the states to homogenize their networks
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Old February 4th, 2008, 02:36 PM   #16
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only few countries i EU have diffrent gauge Spain, Finland, Lithuania, Latvia, Estonia, but there are few diffrent power systems but you can use multi voltage locos and each country has own security systems but they are going to be unified, rail in EU has bright future.
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Old February 4th, 2008, 09:43 PM   #17
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In the Netherlands we are currently opening the new 158,5 km long dedicated freight line "Betuweroute" from the harbor of Rotterdam to the German border. It has lot's of starting problems, only from April on it should be used more and more. If it's in full service eventually it will be very good for railway freight in the Netherlands that has been growing rapidly over the last few years.

some pictures from freight trains in the Netherlands from Flickr:

from: coenormel
image hosted on flickr


from: arnold49
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image hosted on flickr


from: Dortwegt Leen
image hosted on flickr


image hosted on flickr


from: gewoonsanderrr
image hosted on flickr
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Old March 24th, 2008, 05:11 PM   #18
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In the Pilbara, Western Australia, up to 50 miilion tonnes are transported across each km of track per year: the longest train weighed 99,700 tonnes, and was 7.3 km long . It's eight locomotives ran for 275 km transporting 82,000 tonnes of ore under the control of a single driver.

My stats are a bit old here, but three of the six heaviestly trafficed railways are in Australia: BHPIO, Hammersley, & Robe River. BHPIO outperforms UP (Union Pacific) 10 to 1 on average freight density, and CN (Canadian National) 20 to 1.

Needless to say, we would not appreciate a train of this length crossing our level crossings here in the suburbs: 1500m crossing loops are being installed at regular intervals along our (generally single tracked) mainlines: and trains carrying containers from port(s) to cit(ies) are long enough to warrant these loops.
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Old March 24th, 2008, 05:56 PM   #19
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In India, there are no dedicated corridors for freight yet although there is a massive projec underway too have a dedicated freight corridor connecting all corners of the country and setting up large industrial bases around this corridor.
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Old March 24th, 2008, 06:08 PM   #20
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jkjkjk View Post
Here are some numbers for % modal split for freight transport (2005, maritime transport excluded, rounded):

entity rail/road/inland waterways/pipelines
EU 16.5/72.6/65.4/5.5
United States 65.6/51.2/11.1/23.3
Russia 56.4/5.9/2.6/35.1
Canada 61.6/17.9/5.5/22.5

shares for eu countries with the most of freight transport:
Germany 19.6/63.8/13.2/3.4
France 15.1/73.6/3.4/7.9
Spain 4.7/92.6/-/2.6
Poland 25.5/60.9/0.7/12.9
Italy 11.4/83.0/0.1/5.5
UK 11.4/82.9/0.1/5.6
If these are percentage modal split figures, they should add up to (roughly) 100, even rounded. Some do, but obviously the EU (Collective) & US figures don't. And the canadian total is way over 100% too.

Also, is this by tonnage, tonnage-distance or value?

Last edited by Yardmaster; March 24th, 2008 at 06:15 PM.
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