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Old February 6th, 2008, 12:03 AM   #1
krull
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NEW YORK | Domino Sugar Plant | 172m | 565ft | 53 fl | 170m | 560ft | 51 fl | Demo

New rendering from SHoP Architects 2013:


Two Trees


http://www.shoparc.com/node/2436


http://www.shoparc.com/node/2201/project-page


http://www.shoparc.com/node/2201/project-page

New site plan:


http://gwapp.org/2013/03/two-trees-d...-to-community/


http://gwapp.org/2013/03/two-trees-d...-to-community/



======================================================================================


Previously by Raphael Vinoly:

Domino Sugar Plant Developement (architect Rafael Viñoly): Thirteen New Residential Mixed-Use Buildings









--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Domino Sugar Refinery Could Be Largest Single Project on Brooklyn Waterfront
Thirteen New Residential Mixed-Use Buildings: Two Could be 300’ Tall, Two Could be 400’ Tall

Quote:
by Linda Collins
published online 07-06-2007

WILLIAMSBURG — It appears from a Department of City Planning (DCP) document that the Domino Sugar factory development could well be the largest single mixed-use project along the Williamsburg waterfront and the second largest — next to Atlantic Yards — proposed for Brooklyn.

First reported on the blogs curbed.com, gothamist.com and brownstoner.com on Tuesday, the DCP Scope of Work document was placed online in advance of a public scoping meeting on the rezoning of the site set for Tuesday, July 31.

Although the central refinery structure will remain — it is being considered for landmarking, as reported in the Brooklyn Eagle last week — it appears as though additional floors will be built on top of it.

On either side of it, nine new residential buildings are to be constructed on the waterfront portion of the property, between Grand Avenue and South 5th Street, and six new residential buildings will be constructed on property east of Kent Avenue, between South 3rd and South 4th streets.


Two of those along the waterfront could be as high as 300 feet, comparable to a 30-story building, and two could be as high as 400 feet, or a 40-story building, according to the DCP document.

East of Kent, the buildings would be 90 and 140 feet tall.

Also, according to the document, a waterfront esplanade will be constructed the full length of the site with access in at least six places between the new buildings; a floating pier for future water taxi service is planned; and, in addition to an estimated 2,400 apartments (with a portion designated as affordable), approximately 120,000 square feet of retail/commercial space, 100,000 square feet of community facility space, 1,450 parking spaces and additional open space are planned on the 11-acre site.

A spokesperson for the developers, Community Preservation Corporation Resources Inc. and The Katan Group, organized as The Refinery LLC, told the Eagle yesterday that details and architectural renderings of the proposed project would not be available until next week.

As previously reported, the developers have said they are in favor of the proposal by the Landmarks Preservation Commission to landmark the three buildings that comprise the actual refinery. The July 31 Public Scoping Meeting will take place from 2 to 5 p.m. and from 6 to 8:45 p.m. at DCP, 22 Reade St. in Manhattan.


© Brooklyn Daily Eagle 2007




http://www.archdaily.com/category/mixed-use/page/5/
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Old February 6th, 2008, 12:08 AM   #2
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Photos of the plant...




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Old February 6th, 2008, 12:08 AM   #3
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BREAKING: Scope Plan for 'The New Domino' Revealed!


Tuesday, July 3, 2007
by Lockhart




Just when you think it's safe to drift into the July 4th holiday, comes this: the first renderings of what the developers want to build on the site of the Domino Sugar Plant on the Williamsburg waterfront. In three letters, OMG. The images come our way via the draft scope document that's just been posted over at the Department of City Planning, and what it portends for this section of the East River waterfront—a site that developers The Refinery LLC are calling The New Domino—is, in essence, more of the same of what's happening up the coast from here: the construction of towering residential buildings, nine in total along the waterfront with two over 400 feet in height, and two over 300 feet in height. As a scope document, the renderings aren't anything more than placeholders for the (surely oh-so-glassy!) architecture to follow, but does give a view of how the developers would like to populate the site.

As for the Domino Refinery building itself, which is under consideration for Landmarks designation, it would undergo some sort of rehabilitation (assuming the landmarking is green-lighted) for some sort of as-yet uncertain residential/retail/community use, as it becomes enclosed by new residential towers. One crucial note: the developers hope to add floors to the main Refinery building, whether or not it gets landmarked. From what we can gather from the scope document, the iconic Domino Sugar sign—and its building that's always looked to us like a giant sugar box—would be demolished, as would all other structures on the site, several of which are also getting a Landmarks push from preservationists.



Above, courtesy of the Waterfront Preservation Alliance, a view of the Domino Sugar site as it sits now. The site has been unused since 2004, when the current developers acquired it. The scope document indicates that the developers plan to preserve the sizable central Processing House (which they'll likely be required to do by landmarking), but knock down the Adant House adjacent to the Williamsburg Bridge. The future of the small Power House, adjacent to the front of the Processing House, is uncertain.



Above, from the scope document, is the proposed rezone. The key detail here is that the proposed rezoning for much of the Domino site—R-8—matches most of the rest of the Williamsburg waterfront to the north.





These here are the East and West Elevations of the entire scope plan. To understand better what's going on here, let's go to the scope document:


PROPOSED DEVELOPMENT PROGRAM

If approved, the proposed actions would allow for the construction of up to 9 new residential structures along four of the waterfront blocks between Grand Avenue and South 5th Street and up to 6 new residential structures on the upland block east of Kent Avenue between South 3rd and South 4th Streets. The buildings along Kent Avenue would range in height from approximately 50 to 100 feet. Two of the buildings along the waterfront would reach heights of 300 feet and two would reach 400 feet. The buildings on the upland portion of the site east of Kent Avenue would rise to a maximum height of 90 feet along Kent Avenue and 140 feet elsewhere on the lot.

The three buildings which together comprise The Refinery and which are located on the central block of the development between South 2nd and South 3rd Streets, would be reused and converted to some combination of residential, retail/commercial, and community facility uses. As noted above, the program for the reuse of the Refinery building has not been finalized. The project sponsor anticipates adding floors to a portion of the roof of the Refinery building to assist in meeting the project’s goals and objectives as discussed below in “Project Goals and Objectives”. If the Refinery is designated by the LPC, the project sponsor would have to apply to the LPC for a Certificate of Appropriateness for any addition or modification to the exterior of the Refinery. Ground floor retail/commercial uses would be located along both sides of Kent Avenue. Publicly accessible open space, including an esplanade along the waterfront that would connect to Grand Ferry Park to the north of the site, would be constructed as part of the proposed project, as required by the Zoning Resolution.

Additional open space beyond what is required by zoning would be developed between the Refinery building and the waterfront.

It is anticipated that the development would be served by water taxi service. Shuttle bus service would also be provided to carry passengers from the proposed development to nearby subway stations.

The scope document is a long read, 44 pages in total, so if you've got some free time, download the PDF, give it a read, and post any salient details we've missed in the comment thread below. We'll follow up on any promising leads.

Domino Draft Scope of Work Document [nyc.gov]


Copyright © 2007 Curbed
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Old February 6th, 2008, 12:13 AM   #4
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Domino Building at Center of Development Clash


BY PETER KIEFER - Staff Reporter of the Sun
February 5, 2008

Preservationists are set to clash with the company redeveloping the Domino sugar refinery on the Williamsburg waterfront at a Landmarks Preservation Commission hearing today. As part of the second-largest development in Brooklyn, which will include five 40-story towers, the developer, Community Preservation Corporation Resources, is seeking to add a five-story glass structure onto the roof of the Domino building, which was given a landmark status in September.

The developers are aiming to create an 11-acre complex with 2,200 housing units, including 660 that will be dedicated to "affordable" housing. The plan also includes 120,000 square feet of retail space, 100,000 square feet of community facilities space, 1,500 indoor parking spaces, and several acres of open space. The nine residential towers, which will surround the refinery, are designed by architect Rafael Viñoly. Today's hearing will focus exclusively on the fate of the iconic refinery, a building that has come to symbolize New York's faded industrial legacy. Increasingly, northern Brooklyn's waterfront is lined with tall glass condominiums.

The director of advocacy and policy at the Municipal Art Society, Lisa Kersavage, applauded the developer for its support of landmarking the refinery but said she felt the proposed design, by the architectural firm Beyer Blinder Belle, was untenable.

"We need to see this as precious and be more careful how we treat this building, and this very large glass addition just plunked onto the top of it is just not appropriate," Ms. Kersavage said.

The president of CPCR, Michael Lappin, said the glass addition is appropriate and is required to make the project economically viable.

The developer bought the site for $56 million in 2004, and it did not oppose efforts to have part of the factory landmarked, which means that any significant changes to the building must be approved by the 11-member commission.

"There is an enormous cost to preserve the building. We are trying to create some economics that absorbs that cost. It is reasonable to spread some of that around," Mr. Lappin said.

The refinery was built by the Havemeyer family and had been in operation since the 1880s before finally shuttering in 2004. At its peak, it had the capacity to produce about 950 million pounds of sugar a year.

A major point of contention at today's hearing will be the fate of the Domino sign, which faces the New York City skyline, but the developers said no decision on its future has been made.

The landmarks commission can vote to reject the proposal, propose modifications, or approve it outright.


http://www.nysun.com/article/70711
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Old February 6th, 2008, 12:20 AM   #5
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That would look excellent, especially right there on the river. It would give the skyline even yet more fullness.
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Old February 6th, 2008, 03:21 AM   #6
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I like this plan, this would be a great addition to the East river waterfront, and afford great views of Manhatten, the only thing i'd change is the massing, but just a little, or borderline "haphazard".

I wonder what other buildings the preservationists are trying to save, the building with the "Domino Suger" sign looks like it could be rehabiliated nicely for retail and recreation, of course with the neon sign restored
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Old February 6th, 2008, 03:28 AM   #7
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This project looks like PUBLIC HOUSING! Put something worthy of this waterfront property. Much too visible for this piece of crap!
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Old February 6th, 2008, 04:34 AM   #8
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Quote:
Originally Posted by cheeps View Post
This project looks like PUBLIC HOUSING! Put something worthy of this waterfront property. Much too visible for this piece of crap!
The article stated that the renderings are placeholders for massing, and not the architectual final design.
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Old February 6th, 2008, 06:19 AM   #9
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Like them or not, those are not the placeholders, those are the actual renderings. That article is old.
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Old February 6th, 2008, 06:48 AM   #10
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SWEET!
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Old February 6th, 2008, 07:28 AM   #11
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Looks really different. I like it.
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Old February 6th, 2008, 07:50 AM   #12
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Quote:
Originally Posted by krull View Post
Like them or not, those are not the placeholders, those are the actual renderings. That article is old.
I stand corrected, still, i like the plan.
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Old February 6th, 2008, 09:05 AM   #13
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Nice colorful towers. They for a small skyline on their own.
I also like the idea that they will keep the main building from the plant end restore it.
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Old February 6th, 2008, 02:48 PM   #14
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Hum... It's trying to hard to look like London. Not everyone can have its own Tate; good initiative though.
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Old February 6th, 2008, 03:42 PM   #15
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i hate BROWN
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Old February 6th, 2008, 07:31 PM   #16
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I think it's amazing! Fits in skyline of New York
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Old February 6th, 2008, 07:38 PM   #17
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Quote:
Originally Posted by chjbolton View Post
Not everyone can have its own Tate; good initiative though.
Says who?
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Old February 6th, 2008, 08:17 PM   #18
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Quote:
Originally Posted by chjbolton View Post
Hum... It's trying to hard to look like London. Not everyone can have its own Tate; good initiative though.
I truly hope New York isn't trying to look like London...it would be a disaster (for the simple fact that new york is unique while London is the usual european city...).
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Old February 6th, 2008, 08:20 PM   #19
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Actually it might turn out to look more like the Tate (with probably one story addition), if critics have their way...


Plans for Domino Sugar Refinery Elicit Criticism


By MICHAEL WILSON
February 6, 2008

Plans for revisions and additions to the landmark Domino Sugar refinery on the Brooklyn waterfront, including five stories of glass apartments on top, drew criticism from preservationists at a hearing before the city’s Landmarks Preservation Commission on Tuesday.

The alterations to the building, which was designated a landmark in September, require the approval of the commission. No vote was taken on Tuesday, and no date was set for a vote.

The plans, presented in detail for the first time, call for five additional floors of apartments above the 12 floors to be designed within the old building, built in 1884. The first and fifth new floors would be set back six feet from the three floors in the middle, creating a bulging pill shape. Mechanical equipment used in operating the building would be built atop the fifth new floor.

The refinery’s large chimney, a fixture of the Williamsburg waterfront, would rise above the glass addition.

The alterations also include several new windows to be created in the old building.

In addition, the plans call for 2,200 apartments to be built on an 11.5-acre site surrounding the refinery, in buildings of 30 and 40 stories. Thirty percent of the apartments would be reserved for families with low or moderate incomes.

Michael D. Lappin, a partner in the development of the property, called the addition “striking” and said it was essential in offsetting the cost of building the low-income apartments and a waterfront park.

Fred Bland, an architect on the project, called the new apartments a “proud addition” to the building, not one to be hidden away, and likened it to changes made to the Tate Modern museum in London. “I’m not trying to create a little tiny addition to it, as a penthouse,” he said.

Opponents of the alterations spoke against the new floors.

“The proposed glass box addition, plunked on top of the landmark, is simply too large and lacks the compositional organization and the arrangement of details that would relate it to the landmark,” said Lisa Kersavage, with the Municipal Art Society.

Frampton Tolbert, deputy director of the Historic Districts Council, called the addition “architecturally incongruous.”

The alterations were praised by representatives of several church groups and community organizations, which have called for lower-income housing in the neighborhood.

The developers have not incorporated the familiar Domino Sugar sign into the project, but a member of the development team said they were looking for a way to use it. Some on the landmarks board, including the chairman, Robert B. Tierney, urged the developers to find a place for the sign.

“Look hard,” Mr. Tierney said.


http://www.nytimes.com/2008/02/06/ny...in&oref=slogin
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Old February 6th, 2008, 08:33 PM   #20
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Love it! looks like a big improvement on whats already there
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