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Old August 22nd, 2013, 10:24 AM   #21601
Blackraven
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Who do you think is the main culprit that caused this?

1) Mother nature?
or
2) Cheapshit, cost-cutting and shoddy/defective construction work?




SCTEX repair may take weeks
Report by Jorge Cariño, ABS-CBN News
Posted at 08/22/2013 1:19 AM | Updated as of 08/22/2013 1:19 AM




BCDA President Arnel Casanova stands over a fissure at Pasig-Potrero bridge in SCTEX. (Photo by Jorge Cariño, ABS-CBN News)


A worker tends a railing on the side of SCTEX. (Photo by Jorge Cariño, ABS-CBN News)

By the way, for those that don't know what "lahar" is, you can check it here:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lahar

Quote:
Originally Posted by Wikipedia
A lahar /ˈlɑːhɑr/ is a type of mudflow or debris flow composed of a slurry of pyroclastic material, rocky debris, and water. The material flows down from a volcano, typically along a river valley.[1] Lahars are extremely destructive: they can flow tens of meters per second, be 140 metres (460 ft) deep, and destroy any structures in their path.

And this also raises another question:
If there were vehicles and/or people in that area at that time, would any injury or damage result as part of "ACT OF GOD/FORCE MAJEURE"?

Or will the operator/builder of the expressway be liable to pay for damages and other form of compensation to injured or affected party? (especially if it was found that there are defects in construction)

P.S.
Has this even happened recently in first world/developed countries?

Or is this mainly a third world/developing country thing? (i.e. which can be related to cost-cutting and cheapening of construction budgets)
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Old August 22nd, 2013, 10:41 AM   #21602
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Blackraven View Post
Who do you think is the main culprit that caused this?

1) Mother nature?
or
2) Cheapshit, cost-cutting and shoddy/defective construction work?

P.S.
Has this even happened recently in first world/developed countries?

Or is this mainly a third world/developing country thing? (i.e. which can be related to cost-cutting and cheapening of construction budgets)
In Italy it happened, even recently:





Keep in mind that bridges are designed to withstand a certain level of stress, if the stress goes further, it may collapse.
(And lahar doesn't happen every day)
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Old August 22nd, 2013, 02:51 PM   #21603
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The bridge above (on the Po river, SS9 border Lombardy - Emilia Romagna) is 100 years old.

This bridge in Sicily also collapsed few years ago.










This bridge in Friuli collapsed during tests before its opening (2004)


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In real life, electronic toll collection was first introduced in Bergen, Norway in 1986, and well into the 21th century many countries still struggle to implement it.
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Old August 22nd, 2013, 02:52 PM   #21604
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Quote:
Originally Posted by italystf View Post
This bridge in Friuli collapsed during tests before its opening (2004)


This is interesting. Never heard before of a bridge colapsing during the final tests. Do you have more details?
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Old August 22nd, 2013, 03:57 PM   #21605
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bogdymol View Post
This is interesting. Never heard before of a bridge colapsing during the final tests. Do you have more details?
https://maps.google.it/maps?q=Tramon...44.41,,0,20.83
They built a new bridge (made of reinforced concrete) to replace the old single-lane medieval bridge made of stone. On 15th December 2004, after completation, they drove 3 trucks full of gravel over the bridge to test it. The bridge collapsed immediately but fortunately the 3 drivers survived. The bridge was later reconstructed and opened on 25th July 2009.
In 2011 4 men that were responsible for the project were sentenced from 8 to 16 months of prison.
The bridge is on the road SS552 that was under ANAS until 2008 and now it's regional (SR552).
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In real life, electronic toll collection was first introduced in Bergen, Norway in 1986, and well into the 21th century many countries still struggle to implement it.
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Old August 22nd, 2013, 04:13 PM   #21606
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informazioneveneta.blogspot.it/2008/04/perch-crollato-il-ponte-chiavalir.html
The number of screws used was 1\4 of those needed.
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“The transponder’s personalised signal would be picked up when the car passed through an intersection, and then relayed to a central computer which would calculate the charge according to the intersection and the time of day and add it to the car’s bill” - Nobel Economics Prize winner William Vickrey, proposing a system of electronic tolling for the Washington metropolitan area, 1959
In real life, electronic toll collection was first introduced in Bergen, Norway in 1986, and well into the 21th century many countries still struggle to implement it.
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Old August 22nd, 2013, 04:34 PM   #21607
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Thank you for your answers
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Old August 22nd, 2013, 05:27 PM   #21608
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I always considered the testing of the bridges is rather tricky for the drivers of those trucks/tanks whatever.

Part of the dynamic testing of Nuselský bridge in Prague in 1974 were done by using rocket engines. Are there any other possibilities that don't required manned operation (besides remotely controlled vehicles now a days)?

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Old August 22nd, 2013, 05:39 PM   #21609
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Now the most used method of testing is filling the bridge with trucks (or trains) fully loaded. With modern construction technology, bridge colapses should not appear even if the bridge is overloaded. The engineers are mostly measuring the bridge deformations and checking if this are in the limit or outside the limit.

Example: test loading of Vidin (BG) - Calafat (RO) bridge over Danube a few months ago:

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Old August 22nd, 2013, 06:04 PM   #21610
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Blackraven View Post
Who do you think is the main culprit that caused this?

1) Mother nature?
or
2) Cheapshit, cost-cutting and shoddy/defective construction work?
To choose between 1 or 2, you must consider the religious background of the country where the problem happened...
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Old August 22nd, 2013, 06:30 PM   #21611
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bogdymol View Post
Now the most used method of testing is filling the bridge with trucks (or trains) fully loaded. With modern construction technology, bridge colapses should not appear even if the bridge is overloaded. The engineers are mostly measuring the bridge deformations and checking if this are in the limit or outside the limit.
Yes, but 2004 is not that long ago, is it? I mean, is there any other way?
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Old August 22nd, 2013, 07:01 PM   #21612
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Indeed, 2004 is not so far away and we can call it "modern construction era".

Quote:
Originally Posted by italystf View Post
informazioneveneta.blogspot.it/2008/04/perch-crollato-il-ponte-chiavalir.html
The number of screws used was 1\4 of those needed.
This could happen because of 2 reasons:

1. The project designer had misscalculated or made an error in the design, so the number of screws was insufficient.
I doubt a little bit that this was the problem, because such projects are verified before construction starts by other engineers.

2. The company that built the bridge mounted just 1/4 of the screws from the project.
I also doubt this situation because on such a project there is always some engineer (that is not an employee of the constructions company) that checks every stage of the execution and who would make a report about any things done wrong. More, if it was a metalic bridge, the girdens and trusses come from the factory with the necessary screw holes (not too many, not too few, but the exact number of holes that need to have a screw inside).
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Old August 22nd, 2013, 07:07 PM   #21613
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They wanted to save money on screws and hoped they'd get away with it.
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Old August 22nd, 2013, 09:40 PM   #21614
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i don't remember road bridge collapses in Croatia, but there was a railroad bridge failure in 2009. that is freight railroad and it collapsed under heavy freight train, which miracleously succeeded to cross it. i wouldn't be at that engineer's situation feeling the bridge collapsing under his train.
the reason of the bridge failure is uncontrolled exploitation of gravel near the bridge.



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Old August 22nd, 2013, 09:43 PM   #21615
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This bridge in Serbia collapsed in 2005 under 69 tons crane:

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Old August 22nd, 2013, 10:32 PM   #21616
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The most famous bridge ever collapsed:


A similar, recent, oscillation episode in Russia, but they managed to repair it before collapse:


Bridge over Tagliamento river collapsed during a flooding on 4th November 1966 (half of Italy went underwater that day, including the terrible flooding in Florence).
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In real life, electronic toll collection was first introduced in Bergen, Norway in 1986, and well into the 21th century many countries still struggle to implement it.
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Old August 23rd, 2013, 02:51 AM   #21617
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A neat graph

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Old August 23rd, 2013, 09:50 AM   #21618
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Bucharest traffic:

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Old August 23rd, 2013, 09:57 AM   #21619
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So in Bucharest red lights never turn green?
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Old August 23rd, 2013, 04:58 PM   #21620
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Slovenian railway network. Gdynia, Paris, Ankara. Maribor, Udine and Verona are also a bit misplaced.

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