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Old February 8th, 2014, 02:17 AM   #24121
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some of them, mostly the ones who speak strong dialects near the border. I don't (curse).
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Old February 8th, 2014, 03:37 AM   #24122
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Is true that Slovenes (especially near Italy, @hofburg ) do use Italian cursing words while speaking in Slovenian??
Who in Slovenia doesn't live near Italy?
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Old February 8th, 2014, 07:35 AM   #24123
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With "****" and "shit," I'm sure it's the law, or regulations for broadcasters. (For broadcasters. No rules for print.) And beyond that, societal taboo. (I'd never, ever say them in the presence of my mother, for example.)
I remember one episode of a British programme within which Zach Braff was a guest and another guest said something or another, and Braff was surprised that they could get away with saying that.
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Old February 8th, 2014, 11:48 AM   #24124
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Do they use the English "****" while speaking in French?

Green Day concert in Italy. At the end Billie shouts a very obscene profanity in Italian. He does the same at every concert in Italy and every time it's a big scandal because those kind of cursing expressions are censored from Italian media.
The anagram of Codroipo!
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Old February 8th, 2014, 02:46 PM   #24125
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Some years ago in the Hungarian version of the Big Brother there was an Italo-Hungarian partecipant that said a blasphemy in Italian. However it wasn't censored because the Hungarian staff didn't know what he said.
In a German episode of The Simpson, the Italian cook Luigi reply with a blasfemy in Italian after Homer complained because he didn't like the food.
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In real life, electronic toll collection was first introduced in Bergen, Norway in 1986, and well into the 21th century many countries still struggle to implement it.

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Old February 8th, 2014, 02:58 PM   #24126
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Btw. the word "f*ck" is itself very unclear to me. Because there are many many possible translations of this word to my language. Depending on context, it might be translated as a funny innocent invective or as a very very offensive dirty word at the same time.

I really don't know how it is perceived by native speakers. Because we have vast field of invectives with different level of dirtiness and all are translated as "f**k" to english

With the Slovenian language, they have words "jedi i piće" which means "food and drinks". In my language it literally sounds like "Poisons and c*nts" Fairly opposite meaning according our common Slavic origin
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Old February 8th, 2014, 03:37 PM   #24127
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Yes, sometimes Brits use **** as an exclamation: "****, I lost my keys!" or "Where the hell is that ******* book?"
In those cases the word isn't connected with its original sexual connotation and isn't even an insult (like "**** you"). It can be replaced with more polite expressions, like "gosh" or "oh, no".
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“The transponder’s personalised signal would be picked up when the car passed through an intersection, and then relayed to a central computer which would calculate the charge according to the intersection and the time of day and add it to the car’s bill” - Nobel Economics Prize winner William Vickrey, proposing a system of electronic tolling for the Washington metropolitan area, 1959
In real life, electronic toll collection was first introduced in Bergen, Norway in 1986, and well into the 21th century many countries still struggle to implement it.

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Old February 8th, 2014, 04:15 PM   #24128
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Italians are often considered as nation who swears a lot (as all mediteranean nations). but i am extremely dissapointed that p... dio is the best they could invent. it is considered to be so rude probably because of its religious conotation, but I would expect something much more creative from Italians.
translated into Croatian for instance it would be very mild thing (except in front of religious people)
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Old February 8th, 2014, 05:10 PM   #24129
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Italians are often considered as nation who swears a lot (as all mediteranean nations). but i am extremely dissapointed that p... dio is the best they could invent. it is considered to be so rude probably because of its religious conotation, but I would expect something much more creative from Italians.
translated into Croatian for instance it would be very mild thing (except in front of religious people)
Also in Britain they use "oh, my ******* God" and this isn't nowhere as rude as Italian swearing expressions with God. It's probably because of the Catholic tradition that says "don't mention God's name without a reason", so if you aren't supposed to mention it with no reason, it's even worse to mention it next to an insult.
On the other hand, American and Brits find very rude the word "c*nt" (it's used not only for the female genitalia, but also as a strong insult), while the corrispondent Italian word (f1ga or f1ca) it's more mild and used also as synonimous of "hot girl" (only in very informal context, such with friends, however).
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“The transponder’s personalised signal would be picked up when the car passed through an intersection, and then relayed to a central computer which would calculate the charge according to the intersection and the time of day and add it to the car’s bill” - Nobel Economics Prize winner William Vickrey, proposing a system of electronic tolling for the Washington metropolitan area, 1959
In real life, electronic toll collection was first introduced in Bergen, Norway in 1986, and well into the 21th century many countries still struggle to implement it.
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Old February 8th, 2014, 05:12 PM   #24130
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Romanian swearing is not bad either, pretty inventive
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Old February 8th, 2014, 05:19 PM   #24131
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Romanian swearing explained in english: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Romanian_profanity
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Old February 8th, 2014, 05:20 PM   #24132
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Quote:
Originally Posted by volodaaaa View Post
(..)

With the Slovenian language, they have words "jedi i piće" which means "food and drinks". In my language it literally sounds like "Poisons and c*nts" Fairly opposite meaning according our common Slavic origin
That's quite funny, however, with not even a shade of doubt, you probably know actual meaning of that Slovenian words without looking into dictionary, same as I do In Polish it would be "jedzenie i picie" (food and drinks) or "jadło i picie" and "jady i picze" (the other one) And word "picza" is rather softer version of "cipa", which would be proper "c" word.
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Old February 8th, 2014, 05:26 PM   #24133
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Nice video
http://vk.com/video-65948761_1676316...b4995bbbf7f427
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Old February 8th, 2014, 05:50 PM   #24134
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Originally Posted by bogdymol View Post
Romanian swearing explained in english: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Romanian_profanity
Wow, I didn't expected en.wikipedia being so exhaustive in these topics (and in so much languages)
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Categor...ty_by_language
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“The transponder’s personalised signal would be picked up when the car passed through an intersection, and then relayed to a central computer which would calculate the charge according to the intersection and the time of day and add it to the car’s bill” - Nobel Economics Prize winner William Vickrey, proposing a system of electronic tolling for the Washington metropolitan area, 1959
In real life, electronic toll collection was first introduced in Bergen, Norway in 1986, and well into the 21th century many countries still struggle to implement it.

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Old February 8th, 2014, 06:30 PM   #24135
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Originally Posted by piotr71 View Post
That's quite funny, however, with not even a shade of doubt, you probably know actual meaning of that Slovenian words without looking into dictionary, same as I do In Polish it would be "jedzenie i picie" (food and drinks) or "jadło i picie" and "jady i picze" (the other one) And word "picza" is rather softer version of "cipa", which would be proper "c" word.
Polish language has good word for "looking for" or "search" : szukać. Especially in Czech language it means modest synonym for copulating (šukat) But it is not considered as rude.
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Old February 8th, 2014, 06:35 PM   #24136
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Quote:
Originally Posted by italystf View Post
genitalia


Quote:
Originally Posted by volodaaaa View Post
With the Slovenian language, they have words "jedi i piće" which means "food and drinks". In my language it literally sounds like "Poisons and c*nts" Fairly opposite meaning according our common Slavic origin
It's "jedi in pijače" in Slovenian. In Serbo-Croatian it's "jela i pića" ("piće" is singular (drink)).
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Old February 8th, 2014, 07:19 PM   #24137
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Oh, I hadn't been reading this thread much in months, but just realized swearing-and-languages still dominates it
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Old February 8th, 2014, 08:15 PM   #24138
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It's "jedi in pijače" in Slovenian. In Serbo-Croatian it's "jela i pića" ("piće" is singular (drink)).
Well, I've accidentally mixed it up. But cold drinks in Serbo-Croatian (hladna pića) sounds to me like "hungry c*nt"
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Old February 8th, 2014, 09:42 PM   #24139
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Well, I've accidentally mixed it up. But cold drinks in Serbo-Croatian (hladna pića) sounds to me like "hungry c*nt"
That's because in Serbian and Croatian where there is "g" Czech and Slovak languages has "h" (grad-hrad, gladan-hladný).

False friends: "hladan" (cold in Serbian) - "zima" in Slovak, "zima" (winter in Serbian) - "zimné" in Slovak.
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Old February 8th, 2014, 09:44 PM   #24140
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Big news everyone
image hosted on flickr

Engagement ring by cinxxx, on Flickr

... and she said yes
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