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Old April 15th, 2015, 08:56 PM   #31241
Verso
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There's a small unclaimed land between Slovenia and Croatia as well, and there's even a house on it. Whoever lives there, is his/her own boss.
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Old April 16th, 2015, 12:35 AM   #31242
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Verso View Post
There's a small unclaimed land between Slovenia and Croatia as well, and there's even a house on it. Whoever lives there, is his/her own boss.
Map? Articles in English?
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In real life, electronic toll collection was first introduced in Bergen, Norway in 1986, and well into the 21th century many countries still struggle to implement it.
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Old April 16th, 2015, 01:07 AM   #31243
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Quote:
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Map? Articles in English?
http://geosite.jankrogh.com/brezovica.htm (5th picture, and this is the same link as in the border crossings thread)
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Old April 16th, 2015, 01:13 AM   #31244
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http://geosite.jankrogh.com/brezovica.htm (5th picture, and this is the same link as in the border crossings thread)
What's the origin of this very weird border? Does it follow some medieval border like Baarle Hertog\Nassau?
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“The transponder’s personalised signal would be picked up when the car passed through an intersection, and then relayed to a central computer which would calculate the charge according to the intersection and the time of day and add it to the car’s bill” - Nobel Economics Prize winner William Vickrey, proposing a system of electronic tolling for the Washington metropolitan area, 1959
In real life, electronic toll collection was first introduced in Bergen, Norway in 1986, and well into the 21th century many countries still struggle to implement it.
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Old April 16th, 2015, 01:25 AM   #31245
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It was the border between the Holy Roman Empire and Hungary.
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Old April 16th, 2015, 03:55 PM   #31246
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Watch your speed today. There is a speed check marathon in 22 European countries today.

I don't know how the perception is in other countries, but in the Netherlands speeding fines are just seen as a revenue generator that has nothing to do with improving traffic safety. The far, far majority of speeding fines are issued for minor offenses up to 10 km/h too fast, typically on the safest type of road (motorways and four-lane expressways). It only degrades the public perception of law enforcement.
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Old April 16th, 2015, 04:29 PM   #31247
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Originally Posted by ChrisZwolle View Post
Watch your speed today. There is a speed check marathon in 22 European countries today.

I don't know how the perception is in other countries, but in the Netherlands speeding fines are just seen as a revenue generator that has nothing to do with improving traffic safety. The far, far majority of speeding fines are issued for minor offenses up to 10 km/h too fast, typically on the safest type of road (motorways and four-lane expressways). It only degrades the public perception of law enforcement.
In Hungary the police sometimes puts a speed limit sign 40 to a straight road. Then of course no one drives 40 (neither do I although I'm infamous of respecting speed limits strictly), and everyone can be fined.
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Old April 16th, 2015, 06:16 PM   #31248
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There's a 40 km/h speed limit in the last 2 km of road 43 in Hungary, right before the border (on both ways). I've never see anyone respecting that. People are driving with about 70 km/h, but that just because the asphalt surface is quite bad.
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Old April 16th, 2015, 06:26 PM   #31249
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ChrisZwolle View Post
Watch your speed today. There is a speed check marathon in 22 European countries today.

I don't know how the perception is in other countries, but in the Netherlands speeding fines are just seen as a revenue generator that has nothing to do with improving traffic safety. The far, far majority of speeding fines are issued for minor offenses up to 10 km/h too fast, typically on the safest type of road (motorways and four-lane expressways). It only degrades the public perception of law enforcement.
Just 2 examples on how police nearby my home town of Arad is doing their job:

A1 motorway, Arad bypass. Usual speed limit 100 km/h. There was a interchange u/c where was signed 80 km/h. After 90% of it was completed, the company building it went bankrupt and works were stopped for about 1.5 years. During this period, the 80 km/h speed limit remained in place, although there were no works on the motorway directly and traffic could go without any interruption. Police speed controls were there, of course. Exact location (they moved the temporary crash barrier to park the police car there).

A1 motorway, Pecica-Nadlac section: 100 km/h speed limit signed because the motorway is not yet "completed" (some landscaping works are not completed nearby the motorway, but all the asphalt works, road markings, shiny crash barriers etc. are ready since long time ago). Monday after Easter, when nobody was working on the site, the police was checking the speed of the drivers.

I can find other examples too. The worse thing is that they are not staying somewhere where they could prevent accidents, but only in places where the road is good and you could go a little bit faster as the speed limits are not reasonable compared to the road layout.
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Old April 17th, 2015, 09:11 AM   #31250
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ChrisZwolle View Post
Watch your speed today. There is a speed check marathon in 22 European countries today.

I don't know how the perception is in other countries, but in the Netherlands speeding fines are just seen as a revenue generator that has nothing to do with improving traffic safety. The far, far majority of speeding fines are issued for minor offenses up to 10 km/h too fast, typically on the safest type of road (motorways and four-lane expressways). It only degrades the public perception of law enforcement.
The approach is similar in Finland. About 80% of all fines are collected from traffic, and most of those from speeding. The police does not pay much attention to other types of offenses than speeding.

The higher fines (from 21 km/h) are income-related. Thus, they may turn astronomical in extreme cases.
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Old April 17th, 2015, 02:29 PM   #31251
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Very interesting video about the development, and the reasons of it, of the cycling in the Netherlands.

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Old April 17th, 2015, 03:14 PM   #31252
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The approach is similar in Finland. About 80% of all fines are collected from traffic, and most of those from speeding. The police does not pay much attention to other types of offenses than speeding.
Same in Italy, most fines here are for speeding and parking violations (and of course DUI, but that's a criminal offence). Fines for other violations, such mobile phone usage, are fairly rare.
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“The transponder’s personalised signal would be picked up when the car passed through an intersection, and then relayed to a central computer which would calculate the charge according to the intersection and the time of day and add it to the car’s bill” - Nobel Economics Prize winner William Vickrey, proposing a system of electronic tolling for the Washington metropolitan area, 1959
In real life, electronic toll collection was first introduced in Bergen, Norway in 1986, and well into the 21th century many countries still struggle to implement it.
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Old April 17th, 2015, 05:38 PM   #31253
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Beach please.

There has a been case in Slovakia when a new traffic lights were placed at intersection and turned on. Since only small number of drivers respected it, officers came over to check the situation. No fine was imposed, but police suggested to turn the traffic light off. There were literally tens of drivers passing on red light, even witnessed by police officers, and no fine was given.

Another case, as the ministry we force local governments to create bus dedicated lanes to ensure PT preference. Local governments are aware of importance of PT prioritisation, but traffic signs and signal plans must be approved by police eventually. There is a street in Bratislava, full of congestions, so the city proposed the dedicated lane (providing that cars turning to adjacent street can move onto that lane). The respective police body rejected it. Rationale? It would be extra unfavourable for public transport to use that lanes, because cars turning to adjacent streets would hold them up. Period. Perhaps, it is better for PT to share the congestions with cars in full range.
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Old April 17th, 2015, 06:43 PM   #31254
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Turin solved this problem:

https://www.google.it/maps/@45.06902...bMDw!2e0?hl=it

The yellow signs states: "Promiscuous bus lane. Give way to the bus".
Basically a bus lane open for all traffic.

Pure genius.
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Old April 17th, 2015, 07:16 PM   #31255
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btw. this sign means "Except PT"? Cause I can clearly see two buses full of passengers in the lane at the scene
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Old April 17th, 2015, 07:23 PM   #31256
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A bike lane in Timisoara, Romania, just 35 cm wide:

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Old April 17th, 2015, 07:26 PM   #31257
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Quote:
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btw. this sign means "Except PT"? Cause I can clearly see two buses full of passengers in the lane at the scene
yes, access forbidden except for public transportation vehicles
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Old April 17th, 2015, 08:40 PM   #31258
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Quote:
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btw. this sign means "Except PT"? Cause I can clearly see two buses full of passengers in the lane at the scene
Almost the same as in English: Eccetto trasporto pubblico - Except Transport Public. In English is it grammatically incorrect, but easy to understand :-)
Note however that taxi is public transport in Italy, so the white Seat takes that lane legally :-)

Last edited by Attus; April 17th, 2015 at 09:55 PM.
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Old April 17th, 2015, 09:40 PM   #31259
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Same here, but I don't see why taxis would be eligible to use bus lanes. You can't put any more people in a taxi cab than in any other personal car, and taxi drivers often drive around alone anyway.
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Old April 17th, 2015, 09:43 PM   #31260
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Because it's not HOV lane, but public transport lane, and taxis are public transport.
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