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Old July 2nd, 2015, 09:43 PM   #32141
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Gorgeous country, with many renovated buildings, not falling apart like in Ceaușescu times. They also visited the Bran Castle, of course. They watched Bram Stoker's Dracula on the way there. They said they could've been a little longer in Bucharest though (just from 6 pm to 1 pm next day). They also visited Arad, but sadly not Timișoara. They liked both, cities and nature. They just complained about roads a bit.
Lots of my friends and colleagues visit Romania regularly. They go there just to feel kind of steadily missing part of Poland's identity such as - I don't know how to actually say that - maybe in this way: home made cream and butter, barrel smoked sausages and visiting neighbour without phone made appointment. I've been to Romania too and even thought to move there, I liked it so much there. Only problem I actually noticed were drivers; no discipline at all. They are even worse than Poles in the nighties were (which is just about impossible, I thought).
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Old July 3rd, 2015, 01:20 AM   #32142
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I'm holding 1 Romanian leu. Looks plastic.
Yes those banknotes looks ugly compared to European or US ones. Canada has also plastic banknotes, but they are a bit more "colorfull" than romanians one... but not as good as the good ols paper banknotes!

But one good thing about romanians banknotes is that I don't get my pocket full of unnecessarily heavy coins like with Euro. Compared to Euro, the smallest romanian banknote worth 20 times less (5€ vs. 1 leu (~0,25€)), and it's great!
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Old July 3rd, 2015, 01:26 AM   #32143
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I think they can overtake Greece and Romania can overtake Bulgaria.
But Greece might get knocked out of EU thereby putting Romania and Bulgaria back in the dumps, despite the fantastic Struma motorway And Turkei aint happening that's for sure
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Old July 3rd, 2015, 01:37 AM   #32144
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Lots of my friends and colleagues visit Romania regularly. They go there just to feel kind of steadily missing part of Poland's identity such as - I don't know how to actually say that - maybe in this way: home made cream and butter, barrel smoked sausages and visiting neighbour without phone made appointment. I've been to Romania too and even thought to move there, I liked it so much there. Only problem I actually noticed were drivers; no discipline at all. They are even worse than Poles in the nighties were (which is just about impossible, I thought).
Absolutly true about romanian drivers, most of them are driving like kids with absolutly no notion of danger, and/or they could not care less about driving rules as many are using their phones (around 50% of drivers in cities I would say), for example I already saw many time some "extreme" drivers who were driving in the middle of the city with no hand on the steering wheel (one hand holding the phone and the other holding the cigarette... ), there's also a lot of peoples who are still driving without safety belt... and they don't care about prohibitions like for example using a no entry road...

And the answer to that from romanian politicians is only to increase fines, so you could be sure that they will never apply them and to promote corruption as cops will be more tempted to close their eyes and accept cash...

And almost every week you can see some tragic accidents (and I'm only talking about Arad...) with 'at the best' serious injuries, and most of the time many deaths...

(Also about this, romanians blogs/local news websites have no ethics when they show you proudly on their websites the "great" photos they made of inanimate bodies in those kind of tragic accidents... )
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Old July 3rd, 2015, 01:42 AM   #32145
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Yes those banknotes looks ugly compared to European or US ones. Canada has also plastic banknotes, but they are a bit more "colorfull" than romanians one... but not as good as the good ols paper banknotes!
What? I like the 1 RON banknote. But I agree that paper banknotes look more traditional, that's probably why we still have them. I like both anyway.
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Old July 3rd, 2015, 01:48 AM   #32146
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What? I like the 1 RON banknote. But I agree that paper banknotes look more traditional, that's probably why we still have them. I like both anyway.
I completly don't like the touching of the plastic in my hands, seems so cheap... The surface is completly smooth, there no relief like on the Euro banknotes...
Also the colour looks sad for me (green for most of it on the 1 Leu banknote)... but in that point it's still better than US dollars...
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Old July 3rd, 2015, 01:57 AM   #32147
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I remember French francs. They were huge and thin.
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Old July 3rd, 2015, 02:38 AM   #32148
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But Greece might get knocked out of EU thereby putting Romania and Bulgaria back in the dumps, despite the fantastic Struma motorway And Turkei aint happening that's for sure
No, no, no the Struma motorway will solve the Euro-crisis.
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Old July 3rd, 2015, 02:43 AM   #32149
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I feel I'm in the tropics tonight.
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Old July 3rd, 2015, 03:37 AM   #32150
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I remember French francs. They were huge and thin.
True!
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Old July 3rd, 2015, 10:22 AM   #32151
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Romanian currency was introduced quite recently. I don't see why they introduced such low-values notes, while the majority of countries use coins for such denominations. They could have made coins up to 5 or 10 RON (1,25€ and 2,50€) and notes for larger denominations.
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In real life, electronic toll collection was first introduced in Bergen, Norway in 1986, and well into the 21th century many countries still struggle to implement it.
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Old July 3rd, 2015, 12:15 PM   #32152
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Talking about low value banknotes, Serbia has 10, 20, 50 and 100 dinar banknotes which are less then 1 EUR (1 EUR=120 RSD). Coins are 1, 2, 5, 10 and 20, but last two are rarely seen, since there are more printed 10 and 20 banknotes than minted coins (national bank says it's cheaper to print than to mint)...
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Old July 3rd, 2015, 01:12 PM   #32153
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Romanian currency was introduced quite recently. I don't see why they introduced such low-values notes, while the majority of countries use coins for such denominations. They could have made coins up to 5 or 10 RON (1,25€ and 2,50€) and notes for larger denominations.

But this is awesome and a very great idea!

Now I'm used to have my pocket ultra lightweight, and I'm sad when I come back in Euro-aera and that I have to fill my pockets with those heavy unecessary coins...

I love the small banknotes, for me we should have done like the US, having smaller banknotes like 2 or 1€
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Old July 3rd, 2015, 01:15 PM   #32154
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Talking about low value banknotes, Serbia has 10, 20, 50 and 100 dinar banknotes which are less then 1 EUR (1 EUR=120 RSD). Coins are 1, 2, 5, 10 and 20, but last two are rarely seen, since there are more printed 10 and 20 banknotes than minted coins (national bank says it's cheaper to print than to mint)...
And personally I find this great. Also the Serbians Dinars looks good (I already have to use them when I went to Belgrad)
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Old July 3rd, 2015, 01:27 PM   #32155
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But this is awesome and a very great idea!

Now I'm used to have my pocket ultra lightweight, and I'm sad when I come back in Euro-aera and that I have to fill my pockets with those heavy unecessary coins...

I love the small banknotes, for me we should have done like the US, having smaller banknotes like 2 or 1€
When they were working for the adoption of the euro, back in the late 90s, Italian government proposed 1€ and 2€ notes instead of coins. In Italy the biggest coin was worth 0,52€ (1000 ITL).
However, most developed countries today use high-value coins: 2€, 2£ in UK, 2$ in Canada, 500 Yen in Japan, 5 CHF in Switzerland. The USA is an exception, as they like to keep the 1$ bill, but they have the 1$ coin too.
The economic advantage of coins is that they last pratically forever (until the country changes currency or type of coins), while notes need to be replaced when they are worn (and vending machines won't read them).
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“The transponder’s personalised signal would be picked up when the car passed through an intersection, and then relayed to a central computer which would calculate the charge according to the intersection and the time of day and add it to the car’s bill” - Nobel Economics Prize winner William Vickrey, proposing a system of electronic tolling for the Washington metropolitan area, 1959
In real life, electronic toll collection was first introduced in Bergen, Norway in 1986, and well into the 21th century many countries still struggle to implement it.
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Old July 3rd, 2015, 01:44 PM   #32156
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The part about vending machines is especially true. Before the Euro (pre 2011) there were practically no vending machines in Estonia since the largest coin in general use was 1 EEK (€ 0.06). Nowadays vending machines are very common.

It took some time to get used to the fact that Euro coins actually have some value and that you can use them to buy things I even think that 1 and 2 Euro cents should be eliminated.
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Old July 3rd, 2015, 02:22 PM   #32157
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I still have a coin for 0.10 SIT (Slovenian tolar), which is 0.0004 EUR.

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Old July 3rd, 2015, 02:26 PM   #32158
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Wow, that's even less valued than the 50 peseta cents coin I have somewhere (nominally €0.003, but since Spain got rid of peseta cents by the 80s, I think its value today would be close to that).

Our largest coin pre-euro was even larger than our current one: 500 pesetas, which was worth €3.01. However, our largest note was way less valued than today's (and it was more sensible): 10000 pesetas, worth €60.10.

I also think we should get rid of the €0.01 and €0.02 coins, I don't use them anymore.
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Old July 3rd, 2015, 02:28 PM   #32159
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Originally Posted by italystf View Post
When they were working for the adoption of the euro, back in the late 90s, Italian government proposed 1€ and 2€ notes instead of coins. In Italy the biggest coin was worth 0,52€ (1000 ITL).
However, most developed countries today use high-value coins: 2€, 2£ in UK, 2$ in Canada, 500 Yen in Japan, 5 CHF in Switzerland. The USA is an exception, as they like to keep the 1$ bill, but they have the 1$ coin too.
The economic advantage of coins is that they last pratically forever (until the country changes currency or type of coins), while notes need to be replaced when they are worn (and vending machines won't read them).
I'm not sure about the cost, coins aren't free, and they should have considered plastic notes like Canada or Romania who are probably lasting longer for these small notes...

And I don't think it's true, in the US I already used some notes in very bad condition and they were working fine on a vending machine !
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Old July 3rd, 2015, 03:52 PM   #32160
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The part about vending machines is especially true. Before the Euro (pre 2011) there were practically no vending machines in Estonia since the largest coin in general use was 1 EEK (€ 0.06). Nowadays vending machines are very common.

It took some time to get used to the fact that Euro coins actually have some value and that you can use them to buy things I even think that 1 and 2 Euro cents should be eliminated.
No vending machines before 2011? Vending machines can be equipped to take notes, but worn notes often are refused by machines, so the central bank has to replace the old ones with new ones.
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In real life, electronic toll collection was first introduced in Bergen, Norway in 1986, and well into the 21th century many countries still struggle to implement it.
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