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Old April 20th, 2016, 08:23 PM   #33861
NordikNerd
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Interesting that Germany has so many different names in other languages and those names are not even remotely similar.

It's Germany, Allemagne, Nemecko, Tyskland, Deutschland.

Some languages choose to use the word similar to the french Allemagne like the turkish Almanya and others prefer a word similar to Germany like the italian and russian Germania.

Some slavic languages use the word Nemecko for Germany. Hungarians name Germany as the somewhat similar Németorszag. The german language in russian is "nemetskij" which reminds a little of the czech Nemecko word for Germany


France is a country that has similar name in all countries, it starts with Fran-something.
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Old April 20th, 2016, 08:57 PM   #33862
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Quote:
Originally Posted by NordikNerd View Post
France is a country that has similar name in all countries, it starts with Fran-something.
We call it "Francija", but "France" is also a Slovenian name.
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Old April 20th, 2016, 09:49 PM   #33863
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Heck, I have a €2 coin with both France and Slovenija written in it (Slovenian regular coin AFAIK). I got it in Italy back in 2010.
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Old April 20th, 2016, 09:54 PM   #33864
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Quote:
Originally Posted by NordikNerd View Post
Interesting that Germany has so many different names in other languages and those names are not even remotely similar.

It's Germany, Allemagne, Nemecko, Tyskland, Deutschland.

Some languages choose to use the word similar to the french Allemagne like the turkish Almanya and others prefer a word similar to Germany like the italian and russian Germania.

Some slavic languages use the word Nemecko for Germany. Hungarians name Germany as the somewhat similar Németorszag. The german language in russian is "nemetskij" which reminds a little of the czech Nemecko word for Germany


France is a country that has similar name in all countries, it starts with Fran-something.
Slavic languages use the word Německo etc because of its meaning. It is actually quite logical and mostly follows some meaning, sometimes that meaning is quite lost on us after so many years.

English word Germany etc stems from Latin word germanus and stems from the meaning "of the same parents" = of the same birth, tribe, brothers.

German word Deutsch stems from Germanic word diutisc for "similar" or "of the same people"

French word Allemagne comes from the name of the Alemanni tribe.

Czech word Německo , and other Slavic variants, comes from the Protoslavic němьcь which means mute. In Czech němý means mute and Německo is Germany, but the meaning is lost for the most people. The Slavic people differentiated the people on those that they could understand - thus Slavs, e.g. in Czech "Slované" stems from Old Church Slavonic slověnin which means someone who understands. E.g. in Czech slovo means word and Slované are Slavs.

Although this theory gets not so much support as of lately it seems to me quite logical. Those that could be understood were speaking the same word - slovo - Slované, and those that could not speak those words, i.e. their languages, were considered mute - němý - Němci.
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Old April 20th, 2016, 11:25 PM   #33865
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Quote:
Originally Posted by CNGL View Post
Heck, I have a €2 coin with both France and Slovenija written in it (Slovenian regular coin AFAIK). I got it in Italy back in 2010.
[IMG]http://eurocollezione.***************/_JPG_/_SLOVENIA_/2euro2007n.jpg[/IMG]
France it's not related to the country, but it's the first name of France Prešeren.
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In real life, electronic toll collection was first introduced in Bergen, Norway in 1986, and well into the 21th century many countries still struggle to implement it.
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Old April 20th, 2016, 11:33 PM   #33866
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A funny story: years ago I started collecting eurocoins from different countries, so I asked friends and relatives to keep the different ones. I got a text: "Hey, I found 5 cent from Slovenia." It was this one:
[IMG]http://eurocollezione.***************/_JPG_/_SLOVACCHIA_/1_5cent.jpg[/IMG]

I still have to find a coin from Latvia or Lithuania.
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“The transponder’s personalised signal would be picked up when the car passed through an intersection, and then relayed to a central computer which would calculate the charge according to the intersection and the time of day and add it to the car’s bill” - Nobel Economics Prize winner William Vickrey, proposing a system of electronic tolling for the Washington metropolitan area, 1959
In real life, electronic toll collection was first introduced in Bergen, Norway in 1986, and well into the 21th century many countries still struggle to implement it.

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Old April 20th, 2016, 11:41 PM   #33867
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Quote:
Originally Posted by NordikNerd View Post
Interesting that Germany has so many different names in other languages and those names are not even remotely similar.
There's a good video about it:
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Old April 20th, 2016, 11:46 PM   #33868
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Quote:
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Slavic languages use the word Německo etc because of its meaning. It is actually quite logical and mostly follows some meaning, sometimes that meaning is quite lost on us after so many years.
Russian, Bulgarian, Byelorussian, Makedonian are slavic languages that use the word Germania (in cyrillic) although all slavic languages call the german language nemetskij or somewhat similar.(except in makedonian-where they say germanskij)

Interesting that in slavic languages, mute ням-niemy also means dumb. Maybe they didnt like the germans ?

Also italians call german "tedesco" why not germano or alemano ?
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Old April 20th, 2016, 11:58 PM   #33869
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Quote:
Originally Posted by NordikNerd View Post
Interesting that in slavic languages, mute ням-niemy also means dumb. Maybe they didnt like the germans ?
You liked the post with the video above but I feel like you didn't watch it.
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Old April 21st, 2016, 12:09 AM   #33870
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Quote:
Originally Posted by NordikNerd View Post
Interesting that Germany has so many different names in other languages and those names are not even remotely similar.

It's Germany, Allemagne, Nemecko, Tyskland, Deutschland
It is Saksa in Finnish. We have a proverb translating as: "The beloved child has many names". Perhaps it is applicable here.

Quote:
France is a country that has similar name in all countries, it starts with Fran-something.
Well... It is Ranska in Finnish. Of course, also this name is derived from the name France. The history has dropped the letter F and changed the C to S, because F and C are not included in the Finnish alphabet.
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Old April 21st, 2016, 12:18 AM   #33871
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Quote:
Originally Posted by keokiracer View Post
You liked the post with the video above but I feel like you didn't watch it.
Well my friend I actually watched it, but the clip was posted while I wrote my message so I noticed it first after I had posted that message. (which often happends on internet forums)
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Old April 21st, 2016, 01:26 AM   #33872
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Quote:
Originally Posted by NordikNerd View Post
Russian, Bulgarian, Byelorussian, Makedonian are slavic languages that use the word Germania (in cyrillic) although all slavic languages call the german language nemetskij or somewhat similar.(except in makedonian-where they say germanskij)

Interesting that in slavic languages, mute ням-niemy also means dumb. Maybe they didnt like the germans ?

Also italians call german "tedesco" why not germano or alemano ?
They went with Germania versions in the time. But also in Russian you can find Неметчина.

Undoubtedly they were considered also dumb as they did not speak the same language . Btw, dumb and mute in English also share a meaning.
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Old April 21st, 2016, 01:37 AM   #33873
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I'm really always amused at the etymology of Niemcy and the similar names
"those incomprehensible barbarians"
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Old April 21st, 2016, 03:51 AM   #33874
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Quote:
Originally Posted by italystf View Post
[IMG]http://eurocollezione.***************/_JPG_/_SLOVENIA_/2euro2007n.jpg[/IMG]
Could be mistaken for a French coin if looked at briefly.

Quote:
Originally Posted by MattiG View Post
Well... It is Ranska in Finnish. Of course, also this name is derived from the name France. The history has dropped the letter F and changed the C to S, because F and C are not included in the Finnish alphabet.
So it should be "Francka"? Another (obsolete) Slovenian name.
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Old April 21st, 2016, 09:26 AM   #33875
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Quote:
Originally Posted by NordikNerd View Post
Russian, Bulgarian, Byelorussian, Makedonian are slavic languages that use the word Germania (in cyrillic) although all slavic languages call the german language nemetskij or somewhat similar.(except in makedonian-where they say germanskij)

Interesting that in slavic languages, mute ням-niemy also means dumb. Maybe they didnt like the germans ?

Also italians call german "tedesco" why not germano or alemano ?
I don't know why, it just happened. The ancient local name of the German language was theodiscus, meaning "people language", as opposed to Latin which was the language of the learned. From theodiscus came tedesco and also deutsch.
Germano in Italian retains the meaning "brother", but is rarely used because it is seen as an old word. Sometimes we use "germanico", never for the language, though.
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Old April 21st, 2016, 07:22 PM   #33876
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Something off-topic:
My incoming roadtrip to Russia
Visa is still in progress hopefully it arrives tomorrow or we'll have some problems ...
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Old April 21st, 2016, 07:33 PM   #33877
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That's a huge trip Carefully avoiding the tolls of Belarus...
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Old April 21st, 2016, 08:08 PM   #33878
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Not Belarus tolls, but additional bureaucracies involving transiting Belarus border and therefore avoiding need for going twice to Vienna embassy to get Belarus transit visa. First plan was going through Romania, Moldavia and Ukraine to make the trip even more "colorful". However we decided not to risk possible complications when crossing the Ukraine-Russia border because of difficult political situation as our entry into Russia could be denied for no reason at all (which could still happen).
Getting Russian visa for automobile tourism (official name for roadtrip tourism) is pretty complicated thing, which involves getting a letter of guarantee and this involves booking and paying for all the hotels on the way for every single day staying in Russia and then waiting for vouchers.
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Old April 21st, 2016, 10:45 PM   #33879
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7,000km... How many days?
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Which new motorways are currently under construction?
Which new motorways will be opened next?

See 'New motorway projects' thread

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Old April 21st, 2016, 11:44 PM   #33880
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Quote:
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Getting Russian visa for automobile tourism (official name for roadtrip tourism) is pretty complicated thing, which involves getting a letter of guarantee and this involves booking and paying for all the hotels on the way for every single day staying in Russia and then waiting for vouchers.
I wonder how it's possible for overland expedition (such Europe to Mongolia, Europe to China, Europe to Vladivostok), to cope with such regulations. When one plans to drive 10,000km in three weeks, it isn't easy to plan where he will sleep each day.

It was the same in communist Romania and maybe in other communist countries. In 1977, my father and two mates of him travelled by car all the way from Italy to the Black Sea coast, via Ljubljana, Zagreb, Belgrade, Iron Gates, Timisoara, and Bucharest. At the border between Yugoslavia and Romania, border guards asked for a detailed plan of their tour and inspected everything in the car. Actually, during their trip, nobody bothered where they went, but if one were to be found, for example, in Constanta, while he declared he only was going to Timisoara, he may have gotten into troubles.
They had to ask for the visa well in advance, and the visa also included info about the vehicle, not just the identity of occupants.
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In real life, electronic toll collection was first introduced in Bergen, Norway in 1986, and well into the 21th century many countries still struggle to implement it.
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