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Old December 20th, 2016, 06:49 PM   #35061
ChrisZwolle
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Casey Neistat did it again. It looks like Finland.



This video gained almost half a million views in the first hour of release.

Neistat is one of the most famous Youtubers. He recently quit daily vlogging to concentrate on more complex videos like these. His vlogs were considered one of the best, with top of the line equipment and editing, without having a corporate, 'produced' feeling.
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Old December 20th, 2016, 09:30 PM   #35062
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True, he's amazing! But, if his vlogs where good (I watched them everyday), it was getting so boring, finally he was only showing boring stuff like when he was always eating the same brand of vegetable juices, always showing his family the same way, always the sames stuff in most of his last vlogs... It was not as funny as in the beginning and I even started to not like what he was doing, and those boring stuff showed his bad face, the face of a poor guy who was sometimes rude with other peoples.... And also when he publicly endorsed Clinton while before that he was telling everyone that he won't talk about politics because it always divide peoples, maybe at this moment he already knew what would happen to his company...

Hopefully he stopped to do more serious stuff like this one, that's great....... But its also half of the story, the true story is that his company (Beme), a "social media wannabe" but who failed has been purchased by CNN for 25 millions $ (a lot for an almost empty shell), and now he will do stuff for CNN, probably videos, even if he haven't already told what it would be...
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Old December 20th, 2016, 11:17 PM   #35063
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I started watching Casey's vlogs when he was at roughly 200,000 subscribers. Especially in 2016 his growth was quite spectacular. Now that he has such a large following he is pretty much guaranteed to get at least a couple million views in every video. This also means that companies like Samsung are quite happy to sponsor some of the content he produces.

And yes, that's Finland.
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Old December 20th, 2016, 11:27 PM   #35064
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Youtube has a higher penetration rate with certain demographics than television today, so big Youtubers are very interesting for advertisers, as well as the general platform that is Youtube.

Though I don't get why Pewdiepie is so popular (fifty million subscribers!). Crazy Russian Hacker is funny at times, though eventually it tends to be much of the same. I also like the Slow Mo Guys.

Daily vlogging is quite a challenge. You need to get interesting video out every single day, it's much harder than it looks. Many people try it, but only a small group is really successful. The club that consistently gets 100,000+ views on each video is fairly small.
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Old December 21st, 2016, 08:43 AM   #35065
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I have no interest whatsoever in vlogs and guys publishing videos. I must admit, I can't understand why someone should want to watch a random guy say random things in a video, unless it's a thematic channel (I watched some science related shows on YouTube).
I have troubles with videos: I thing written words convey much more information in less time.
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Old December 21st, 2016, 12:48 PM   #35066
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ChrisZwolle View Post
Casey Neistat did it again. It looks like Finland.
Yes. The place is the Levi ski resort about 150 km north of the Arctic Circle.
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Old December 21st, 2016, 03:47 PM   #35067
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I have a question for members from the Eastern EU (i.e. post-communist countries). The average monthly salaries are reported to be € 700 - 1100. That sounds low by Dutch standards, but of course the cost of living is lower.

But what do you generally pay for rent or mortgage? I've read that in some countries a considerable share of the population lives in a house with no outstanding mortgage or rent. In that case, the purchasing power of a € 1000/month salary may be more comparable to € 1500 - 1800 in western Europe.

In the Netherlands the general rental cost for social housing is between € 400 - 700 per month (excluding utilities). But in the unregulated market, rents over € 1000/month are more common.

It's interesting to get some better insight into the cost of living differences, some of which you may not experience as a brief visitor or tourist. Especially since housing is by far the largest component in the cost of living for most people, which you do not see as a tourist.
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Old December 21st, 2016, 03:47 PM   #35068
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Meanwhile in Dawlish, England......

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-england-devon-38384483
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Old December 21st, 2016, 05:12 PM   #35069
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ChrisZwolle View Post
I have a question for members from the Eastern EU (i.e. post-communist countries). The average monthly salaries are reported to be € 700 - 1100. That sounds low by Dutch standards, but of course the cost of living is lower.

But what do you generally pay for rent or mortgage? I've read that in some countries a considerable share of the population lives in a house with no outstanding mortgage or rent. In that case, the purchasing power of a € 1000/month salary may be more comparable to € 1500 - 1800 in western Europe.

In the Netherlands the general rental cost for social housing is between € 400 - 700 per month (excluding utilities). But in the unregulated market, rents over € 1000/month are more common.

It's interesting to get some better insight into the cost of living differences, some of which you may not experience as a brief visitor or tourist. Especially since housing is by far the largest component in the cost of living for most people, which you do not see as a tourist.
Most Romanians live in their own house/apartment. Affording one is not easy, but somehow everybody manages it. Either with help from parents, doing much of the construction/renovation work themselves or with friends/family members/black market.

There is also no shame in living with the parents. So living costs are not so high.

On the other hand if you buy food, clothes or electronics, they cost the same or even more than in WEurope. Some people don't afford new clothes, so they get second hand or "fake" things.

Labour is payed 3-4 times less than in Germany for example. I haven't seen a car washing place where workers actually wash your car in Germany, in Romania is the norm

But tbh I have no idea how some people manage, they are constantly in debt to several people. Somehow they do
Young people in WEurope send money home to help their family.
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Old December 21st, 2016, 06:23 PM   #35070
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I can confirm what cinxxx wrote above. I would add some more:

During communism all apartment blocks belonged to the state. After the communism fell in 1989 the state sold those apartments to the people living in them, and this turned to be very profitable for the people: they established a price (let's say 100.000 Romanian lei which was at that time worth 50.000 USD) which was divided into monthly payments over a few years (let's say 1.000 Romanian lei per month which was 500 USD per month). Next few years the inflation was very high and the Romanian leu was worth a lot less, so in the end they still had to pay the same 1.000 per month, but now that was worth 10 times lower. Therefore, most of the apartments were purchased at a very low price.

While I lived in Romania, as almost all my young friends and relatives, I stayed together with my parents, so there were 0 costs for housing for me.

Depending a lot on city, location, size, furniture, recently renovated etc., I think the rent for a small decent apartment varies between 200 and 400 Euro per month, plus the utilities (add 70 to 150 Euro per month).

Regarding the prices, there are some differences, sometimes is more expensive in Western EU and sometimes in Romania.

However, in Romania there are always cheaper: internet, telephone, car related costs (insurance, tax, service etc.), restaurants, hotels.

If you look for gadgets (electronics like photo cameras, laptops etc.) you will almost always find them cheaper in Western EU.

Clothes for example are at a similar price in both locations, however when I have been in Spain I have noticed that a brand that is considered as premium in Romania was about 50% cheaper in Spain (without any special discount), and another brand that I could not even think about in Romania (because of very high prices) was extremely cheap in USA (this time with a season's sale).

Other items vary...
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Old December 21st, 2016, 06:53 PM   #35071
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In Budapest and basically everywhere in Hungary there are not flats to rent. Every one live in their own house or flat. Most people inherited it or built it themselves, many family houses were built in the 70's and 80's.
In cities all flats were owned by the state in the communist times and they were sold extreme cheap to people that lived in them after 1990.
Because it's very difficult to find a flat to rent (it is only possible in the black market but even so there are very few of them) and youg people usually have no money for buy an own flat, it is quite usual to live in parents's flat even with 30.
So yes, a vast majority of Hungarian people pay neither rent nor mortgage.
However, the mentioned 700-1,100€ is overestimated. A net salary of 700€ monthly is pretty good in Hungary, 550-600 is much more typical, and in Eastern and Southeastern Hungary 4-500 is OK.
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Old December 21st, 2016, 07:06 PM   #35072
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Just my experience for Bratislava, Slovakia - for purchasing price 123.000 € we got 3,5 rooms - 75m2 flat from 1984 (reconstructed of course). 30 yrs mortgage with 1,49% interest is on almost 400 €/month + utilities ca 180-220/month €, which are by far one of the highest utility expenses for post communist countries in the world. Good crowd source comparison can be found on www.numbeo.com

For solely living person total expenses 600 € for mortgage + utilities per month are unaffordable, but for pair with typical income for Bratislava 800 - 1000 € is reasonable.
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Old December 21st, 2016, 07:13 PM   #35073
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That's very different from the Netherlands, very few people live in a house that's paid off. Mortgages where you only pay the interest were very popular in the 1990s and early 2000s as housing prices appreciated very fast.

I could not live on € 700 per month. Rent, health insurance and utilities already exceed that, not to mention transportation, food, clothing, furniture, leisure, etc.

It is common for low income households to get rental allowance and health care allowance, which combined can be around € 300 a month if you make less than € 20,000 annually (gross income). So people earning the minimum wage (which is € 1550/month) pay no net income tax. It is basically understood that you cannot make a living on a minimum wage without government subsidies in the Netherlands.
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Old December 21st, 2016, 08:01 PM   #35074
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In Italy I pay 430 € /month as a rent for a 40/50 m^2 apartment in semi-central Turin, plus utilities (more or less 500-550 in total, depending on months).
I am paying 200k to buy an apartment in the outskirts of Brescia, 85 m^2, 2 bedrooms 2 bathrooms. But it is a kind of social housing, free market is almost 30% more.

I'm not sure there is a minimum salary in Italy (don't think so), but anyways mine is lower than the Dutch minimum, and it is not bad by Italian standards. Of course there are a lot of differences between cities and rural and between North and South. If you are a civil servant, like me, you also get meal vouchers, summing up to 140€/month, that you can spend tax free in restaurants and supermarkets.
All in all, after taxes and housing expenses, I live with 800 €/month, which isn't that bad but of course I do not swim in luxury.
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Old December 21st, 2016, 08:10 PM   #35075
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its cheap your rent in turino , here in Vitoria (E) the standard is about 800-900 euros
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Old December 21st, 2016, 08:35 PM   #35076
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Holy cow.... Surgut, Russia.

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Old December 21st, 2016, 08:43 PM   #35077
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The liquid in that thermometer is definitely not mercury, as that would have frozen at around -37ΊC.
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Old December 21st, 2016, 09:40 PM   #35078
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Quote:
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I'm not sure there is a minimum salary in Italy (don't think so)
In Hungary there is one, it's 127,500 forint in 2017 (approx. € 410). If completed secondary school is a must for the job, the minimum salary is 161,500 forint (approx. € 520). However in Hungary the minimum wage is not tax free, so if your gross salary is 161,500 and you have no children, you get a net of 107,400 forint (€ 350).
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Old December 21st, 2016, 09:44 PM   #35079
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Quote:
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Holy cow.... Surgut, Russia.
Ivan in Moscow saw in the TV that it's very cold in Omsk. He has a friend in Omsk so calls him by phone and asks:
- Hello, Sergei, is it really so cold in Omsk?
- Hello, yes, it's about -5 degrees.
- -5? Relly? No colder?
- No, -5, sometimes, erly morning, possibly -8.
- Hmmm, in TV News was said it was -35 there outside.
- O, Ivan, you mean outside?
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Old December 21st, 2016, 09:57 PM   #35080
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The boiling water trick. I wonder how much it cools off just by walking it outside for a moment.

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