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Old November 14th, 2017, 09:23 PM   #37481
Kpc21
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Kanadzie View Post
I'm always amused when traffic is stopped for some few cm of snow, it's so hilarious
is it just crazy people or complete lack of salt? I think not even...
The countries where snow is a rare phenomenon (e.g. once a few years, or even on single days in a year) do not prepare for winter because this - maintaining all the snow removing equipment, buying and storing sand and salt, would be more costly then the loses because of the transportation problems on those rare days when the snow appears.

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Originally Posted by Penn's Woods View Post
Colloquially, English-speaking people pretty much use the 12-hour clock exclusively: that 0012 would be 12:12 a.m.
Poland uses both systems. The 24-hour clock seems to be getting more popular nowadays, when there are digital clocks everywhere.

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Originally Posted by MichiH View Post
Translating the German "1998" back to English, it's "nineteen hundred eight and ninety" though
Still it's not as crazy as in French, where e.g. 92 is spelled and pronounced as "eighty twelve", as they have no single word for ninety.

Luckily, in Polish it's as simple as in English.

But sometimes people make errors while reading dates. Say, today is 14.11.2017 (in the notation used in Poland, also in Germany and some other European countries - in Poland we write it in such a way, or as 14 XI 2017, but now, in the era of computers, the notation with Roman numerals is losing its popularity). In English it's read as "the fourteenth of November 2017", and in the same way, in Polish we say "czternasty października 2017", where this ending -a indicates the genitive case, equivalent to the English "of ...". But some people say it incorrectly as "czternasty październik", which literally would actually mean something like "the fourteenth November".

Last edited by Kpc21; November 14th, 2017 at 09:31 PM.
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Old November 14th, 2017, 09:33 PM   #37482
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Still it's not as crazy as in French, where e.g. 92 is spelled and pronounced as "eighty twelve", as they have no single word for ninety.
Nonante in Belgium and Switzerland. But it is not used in France and Canada. They say quatre-vingt-dix (4x20+10).
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Old November 14th, 2017, 09:59 PM   #37483
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Yesterday I watched again the 12th stage of the 2017 Giro d'Italia, which was partly routed along the "abandoned" stretch of the A1 through the Valico Apenninico. I had missed that part when the stage was originally broadcast. If you like Italian mountain motorways and have the chance to watch it (Eurosport player or similar), I highly recommend it.
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Old November 14th, 2017, 10:54 PM   #37484
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Polish van making circus driving under ban on strong wind at A7. must see if you don't think that wind is dangerous thing.

(only facebook video unfortunately)

https://www.facebook.com/danijel.dra...7906209243088/
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Old November 14th, 2017, 11:01 PM   #37485
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ATMs are in steep decline in the Netherlands. Some 800 have been removed over the past 5 years and some other 2000 will disappear as well. By 2020, all ATMs are bank-neutral. Already for a long time you can get cash at any ATM with any bank card in the Netherlands, free of charge.

ATMs are removed for safety in a lot of areas. They have long been targets of explosive robbery, and the robbers often use extremely powerful explosives that blow out the entire facade of the building the ATM is mounted in, which is a considerable danger for local residents and passerby's.

Also, the Netherlands is increasingly cashless. You can use a debit card at virtually all shops, at parking meters, vending machines, cafeterias, even on the market it is common. Payment terminals are now cheaper to operate for shop owners than cash.

The only problem for foreigners: credit cards are not commonly accepted in all shops, especially outside of the main tourists destinations. Due to the early introduction of debit cards, much Dutch don't use their credit card in the Netherlands.

Here's the decline of ATMs of the 4 largest banks in the Netherlands:
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Old November 14th, 2017, 11:44 PM   #37486
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Polish van making circus driving under ban on strong wind at A7. must see if you don't think that wind is dangerous thing.

(only facebook video unfortunately)

https://www.facebook.com/danijel.dra...7906209243088/
Maybe overloaded, or the goods inside are placed in such a way that the vehicle is not weighed correctly.

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Originally Posted by ChrisZwolle View Post
ATMs are in steep decline in the Netherlands. Some 800 have been removed over the past 5 years and some other 2000 will disappear as well. By 2020, all ATMs are bank-neutral. Already for a long time you can get cash at any ATM with any bank card in the Netherlands, free of charge.
Well. It was crazy in Germany that I could withdraw money from my Polish account (the currency of which is euro!) free of charge from any ATM in this country, but when I opened a German account, I had to select only the ATMs of the bank I have an account in (or a few banks which are in an association for sharing their ATMs free of charge - but the biggest one - Sparkasse/Volksbank - is not in this association), and the fees for withdrawing in a "fremd" ATM were extremely high.

While in Poland, it depends on the bank offer and the account you choose from it - but having free withdrawals from any ATMs (sometimes not only in Poland but even everywhere all over the world) is nothing uncommon. Sometimes you have free withdrawals from the ATMs of your bank and of one of the bank-neutral ATM networks, like Euronet.

But the ATMs are common and it's not difficult to find one. Most Biedronka discount stores have bank-neutral ATMs inside too.

In many places you can also find "deposit-o-mats" ("wpłatomat", ATM is called "bankomat" in Poland) which allow you not only withdraw the money from your account, but also deposit some money in form of cash on it, without going to a bank counter.

I haven't notice any decrease of their number. ATM robberies sometimes happen, and if so, they are usually quite spectacular, with the robbers blowing the ATM up or pulling it with a car But it's very rare.
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Old November 14th, 2017, 11:47 PM   #37487
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ChrisZwolle View Post
ATMs are in steep decline in the Netherlands. Some 800 have been removed over the past 5 years and some other 2000 will disappear as well. By 2020, all ATMs are bank-neutral. Already for a long time you can get cash at any ATM with any bank card in the Netherlands, free of charge.

ATMs are removed for safety in a lot of areas. They have long been targets of explosive robbery, and the robbers often use extremely powerful explosives that blow out the entire facade of the building the ATM is mounted in, which is a considerable danger for local residents and passerby's.

Also, the Netherlands is increasingly cashless. You can use a debit card at virtually all shops, at parking meters, vending machines, cafeterias, even on the market it is common. Payment terminals are now cheaper to operate for shop owners than cash.

The only problem for foreigners: credit cards are not commonly accepted in all shops, especially outside of the main tourists destinations. Due to the early introduction of debit cards, much Dutch don't use their credit card in the Netherlands.

Here's the decline of ATMs of the 4 largest banks in the Netherlands:


On my first day driving in Europe, in July 2015, I was unable to pay for parking in Groningen, because the machines would not accept any of my cards. Fortunately, I wasn’t ticketed (or if Hertz was, they never told me).

More generally, it’s always hit-or-miss which card’s going to work where over there. And they’ve all got chips at this point. (And here, retailers are still getting up to speed; I’ve never had a card rejected, but sometimes the chip won’t be read and I have to swipe and sign.)
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Old November 15th, 2017, 01:41 AM   #37488
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Kpc21 View Post
The countries where snow is a rare phenomenon (e.g. once a few years, or even on single days in a year) do not prepare for winter because this - maintaining all the snow removing equipment, buying and storing sand and salt, would be more costly then the loses because of the transportation problems on those rare days when the snow appears.
But even for me in Canada, say, I drive through snow worse than seen in that picture every year at least a few times, and nobody has a real issue or even slows much down
The roads ministry hires a company to clear the snow, salt, etc, but when the snow starts falling quickly, the road is covered before they are there...
The only one I can think of was last year in the Montreal area, where Autoroute 13 became closed in heavy blizzard. But it was because two idiots in TIR tried to pass each other and couldn't make traction up an incline... but that, that was some snow!
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Old November 15th, 2017, 09:51 AM   #37489
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Kanadzie View Post
But even for me in Canada, say, I drive through snow worse than seen in that picture every year at least a few times, and nobody has a real issue or even slows much down
The roads ministry hires a company to clear the snow, salt, etc, but when the snow starts falling quickly, the road is covered before they are there...
You cannot recognize the logic? Often snow - much preparation. Sometimes snow - some preparation. Seldom snow - less or no preparation.
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Old November 15th, 2017, 02:06 PM   #37490
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The only problem for foreigners: credit cards are not commonly accepted in all shops, especially outside of the main tourists destinations. Due to the early introduction of debit cards, much Dutch don't use their credit card in the Netherlands.
But foreigners may have cash and pay by cash. As far as I know cash is accepted everywhere in the Netherlands (except for some parking meters or vending machines, but they usually accept credit cards). And all (continental) neighbors use the same currency.
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Old November 15th, 2017, 04:09 PM   #37491
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But foreigners may have cash and pay by cash. As far as I know cash is accepted everywhere in the Netherlands (except for some parking meters or vending machines, but they usually accept credit cards). And all (continental) neighbors use the same currency.
When travelling, usually it's not wise to carry large amounts of money. Nor it is practical to run to the ATM every other day...
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Old November 15th, 2017, 04:25 PM   #37492
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When I take trips through Europe I usually do not carry more than some € 60-70 in cash with me. Most of that ends up being spend in a bar, only in Germany I am prepared to pay the campsite in cash. A payment terminal is not a given on German campsites, despite the high frequency of € 100+ campsite bills. On the other hand in Sweden the guy came to my tent where I could pay by card - wireless. Two modern countries, yet so different.
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Old November 15th, 2017, 04:41 PM   #37493
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Still it's not as crazy as in French, where e.g. 92 is spelled and pronounced as "eighty twelve", as they have no single word for ninety.
Even worse: It's something like "four-twenties-twelve", as they don't have a word for eighty either .
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Old November 15th, 2017, 05:54 PM   #37494
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Even worse: It's something like "four-twenties-twelve", as they don't have a word for eighty either .
Gosh, the binary system is easier .��
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Old November 15th, 2017, 09:37 PM   #37495
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On trips I pay nearly everything in cash. I am not so friend of card payments. Only cash is True.
In the last years I had some situations where the card payment does not work and I was happy that I had cash with me.
Also at Albert Heijn a Dutch Supermarket they did not accept my credit or maestro card some years ago, because the cards are German.
That summer near Trieste to pay the toll to leave Italy direction to Slovenia. The machine did not want to read my visa card. I tryed it very much. All in all I paid at the machine in cash, so the problem was solve.
At that summer the toll in Italy was only paid with card, rest like fuel, hotel, food and so on in cash
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Old November 15th, 2017, 09:46 PM   #37496
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I had been living in Hungary up to 2012 when I was 38 years old. Then I moved to Germany and was surprised, how mush more people pay by cash, than in Hungary, although Hungary as well uses pretty much cash.
In the retail shop nearby it is now possible to pay by a contact less card. In Hungary it has been very common for 7-8 years.
I don't like cash and pay by card any time it's possible. Unfortunately, because of the lack of contact less cards* I must use more cash than in Hungary, especially by payments under ten euro.
I have a German EC card which is a special German thing and a Mastercard Gold and a Hungarian "normal" Mastercard. The EC card and the Hungarian card may be used contact less as well.

* Paying by a card, pushing it in the reader, typing PIN code, waiting, etc. is too complicated if you buy a newspaper and pay 4.90. Most retailers do not even have a terminal, or definitely forbid to pay by card under 10 euro.
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Old November 15th, 2017, 09:47 PM   #37497
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Meanwhile in Norway:

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I don't know. Thie first moment the driver could see the kid is this:

Two seconds and approx. 25 meters later he stopped:

It seems to be impossible for me.
OK, some people write that kind of truck has sensors and automatic brakes, so the driver's reaction time does not matter at all - he could have been sleeping, the truck had stopped any way. Even so, it's like a wonder.
Evidently this truck was not equipped with emergency brakes. It was the quick reaction of the truck driver alone which prevented the accident. It was a truck from a Latvian transportation company.

https://www.nrk.no/buskerud/rapport_...len-1.13779646
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Old November 16th, 2017, 10:46 AM   #37498
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Only cash is True.
And that's, my friends, why Germany is so fond of cash.
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Old November 16th, 2017, 12:09 PM   #37499
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Just a small tip (commercial, but I have no affiliation to it): for people who live in EU countries with more lackluster payment systems, you could easily open an account in one of the many "online-only" banks that are trading in the EU. They are app-based and don't offer things like mortgages or personal credit or insurance, just transactions and sometimes credit-cards with instant withdraw (meaning no rolling credit). Several offer NFC debit products as well.

They are, for all legal purposes, financial institutions regulated by national bank authorities and able to do business in other countries. They all have English interfaces and custome service even when based outside UK/Ireland. They will mostly use scan of documents and digital signature instead of sending docs by mail.

Examples:
BUNQ - https://www.bunq.com/
LEUPAY - https://www.leupay.eu/
N26 - https://next.n26.com/en-eu/

And there are some other new players. The idea is not exactly new, but in the past they were not banks, just transaction services with less protection and questionable customer service. That is no longer the case.
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Old November 16th, 2017, 02:45 PM   #37500
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Just a small tip (commercial, but I have no affiliation to it): for people who live in EU countries with more lackluster payment systems, you could easily open an account in one of the many "online-only" banks that are trading in the EU. They are app-based and don't offer things like mortgages or personal credit or insurance, just transactions and sometimes credit-cards with instant withdraw (meaning no rolling credit). Several offer NFC debit products as well.

They are, for all legal purposes, financial institutions regulated by national bank authorities and able to do business in other countries. They all have English interfaces and custome service even when based outside UK/Ireland. They will mostly use scan of documents and digital signature instead of sending docs by mail.

Examples:
BUNQ - https://www.bunq.com/
LEUPAY - https://www.leupay.eu/
N26 - https://next.n26.com/en-eu/

And there are some other new players. The idea is not exactly new, but in the past they were not banks, just transaction services with less protection and questionable customer service. That is no longer the case.
Hold your horses for a few months. The revised EU Payment Services Directive PSD2 should be in effect in the EU countries by Jan 1st, 2018. That forces the banks to open their account and payment interfaces to third parties. New innovations related to transaction services are expected to raise.
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