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Old November 23rd, 2017, 11:52 PM   #37521
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Yes Zastava means flag.

The name origins from Zavod Crvena Zastava (Red Flag Factory) which was actually changed in the 50's. Before that they produced military vehicles only.
What I now as a interesting fact is that the car I posted above (Zastava 750) was produced in a million vehicles since the model debuted and the model production ended in the late 80's.
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Old November 24th, 2017, 12:07 AM   #37522
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Nice to know.
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Old November 24th, 2017, 01:05 AM   #37523
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Riga has mostly used Tatra trams, before then we used trams from local manufacturer RVR, recently we have started switching to Skoda trams.


The most popular ones currnelty used are Tatra T3.


RVR-6 was built in Riga and were used up until 1981.


Skoda 15T Riga - the model Riga is currently switching to.


As for buses, we mostly use Solaris, though we used Ikaruses up until 2005, currently there are also some new Solaris buses being delivered.

These are the old Ikarus 280 we had.


Solaris Urbino 18 which were delivered around 2002 are the mostly used ones.


And these are the new Urbino 18's currently being delivered.
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Old November 24th, 2017, 01:49 AM   #37524
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Junkie View Post
Concerning the bold, SFRY had its own car brand Zastava it was very famous and reliable brand.
The Yugo car was even exported to the US in the late 80's.
This car sold decently well in the US but got a very bad repuation quickly. The import stopped not because of sales decline, but UN sanctions on Serbia Later NATO bombed the factory, maybe some fighter pilot had owned one
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Old November 24th, 2017, 03:25 PM   #37525
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Cash usage in the eurozone

Source: ECB







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Old November 24th, 2017, 06:35 PM   #37526
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A nice little mobile game for highway enthusiasts:

https://play.google.com/store/apps/d...cbuilder&hl=en

It is designed for managing a small traffic signal intersection, and keeping cars moving and not colliding. But it comes with an intersection designer which is remarkably versatile and allows for some huge maps, so the community have made various interchanges, toll gates, and even entire cities, which can be simulated so you can just watch the cars and mass transit move around:

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Old November 24th, 2017, 07:08 PM   #37527
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Quote:
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Cash usage in the eurozone
I cannot comment other countries but the figures for Finland are most incredible.

What I can see at the shops, at least 95% of the POS transactions of value higher than 10 EUR are cashless, at least in the town areas. Robbing a supermarket would be close to ridiculous, because the amount of cash is low.

The Chart 26 lacks credibility, too. All items listed are paid as money transfers to a bank account. Paying cash is almost always an indication of something illegal happening.
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Old November 24th, 2017, 07:57 PM   #37528
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I agree. The high share of cash often indicates something going on off the books and out of sight of the tax agency. Though in Germany they cling to cash for some reason. In the Netherlands it has been common to get your salary deposited in a bank account since the 1960s, so there isn't really a cash culture, especially for larger transactions. The same goes for France which was an early adopter of credit cards.
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Old November 24th, 2017, 08:57 PM   #37529
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ChrisZwolle View Post
I agree. The high share of cash often indicates something going on off the books and out of sight of the tax agency. Though in Germany they cling to cash for some reason. In the Netherlands it has been common to get your salary deposited in a bank account since the 1960s, so there isn't really a cash culture, especially for larger transactions. The same goes for France which was an early adopter of credit cards.
A private person selling a car to another one often involves cash in Finland. That is not an indication about an illegal transaction but about lack of a trusted third party service to protect both the seller and the buyer. Instead, I prefer a domestic instrument called "Bank Cheque". It is backed up by the issuing bank, and any bank cashes it after validation. Thus, it is almost equal to cash but protected against loss and fraud.

(A few years ago, I sold by VW Polo, and the buyer wanted to pay cash. I hurried to the nearest bank office with 10,000+ euro in my pocket. Most inconvenient.)
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Old November 24th, 2017, 09:01 PM   #37530
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Is it more common in Finland do have person-to-person second-hand car sales than through a dealer?
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Old November 24th, 2017, 09:07 PM   #37531
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Second hand car sales in the Netherlands are often through a garage or dealership, most person-to-person sales are typically very low value cars, usually not a € 10,000 car.
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Old November 25th, 2017, 12:31 AM   #37532
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Is it more common in Finland do have person-to-person second-hand car sales than through a dealer?
The cheaper the more often it goes person-to-person. No room for the margin for the dealer. There is no strict boundary; perhaps somewhere between 10 and 15 keuros. I sold my Polo person-to-person, because both me and the buyer reached a better price.

Most of second-hand trade takes place at internet market places such as https://www.nettiauto.com/en where both dealers and invidual people sell their cars, boats, caravans, bikes whatever.

Because of the low population density, most new cars are sold by multi-brand dealers. This is a different setup from many European countries. Earlier today, I met my dealer to take my first look at the brand new Skoda Karoq. That company sells Mercedes-Benz, Skoda, Smart, Ford and Honda. Those companies usually sell only those second-hand cars which are quite new and in a very good condition. The other ones are resold to other dealers. So, there is kind of a hierarchy in place.

I think there is quite lot of dealer-to-dealer trade to fill the gaps in the sortiment. A second-hand car owned earlier by a person in the south Finland may appear at a dealer 600 kilometers to the north, for example.
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Old November 25th, 2017, 09:59 AM   #37533
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Is it possible to pay everywhere with credit card in UK, for instance like it's possible in Sweden? Or should you always have some cash with you?
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Which new motorways are currently under construction?
Which new motorways will be opened next?

See 'New motorway projects' thread

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Old November 25th, 2017, 11:36 AM   #37534
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Dutch second hand cars are usually sold through garages and dealerships because they usually offer a six month warranty, regardless of how old the car is. This gives a better guarantee that you're not buying a car with hidden defects. So even if you buy a 10 year old car there is still a warranty that pays for repairs if needed.

That is also a reason why Dutch people are fine with buying a used car instead of a brand new one. Combined with the mandatory odometer logs since 1991, there is little chance of buying a fraudulent vehicle.
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Old November 25th, 2017, 12:08 PM   #37535
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Here in Poland most second-hand cars are solid either directly from owner to owner, or through reselling companies called "komis", buying second-hand cars and selling them. Car dealers also do it, but buying a second-hand car from a dealer is less popular.

Nowadays it takes place over online platforms, like our local eBay equivalent called Allegro (eBay, even though it has a Polish version, has almost no meaning in Poland, Allegro for us is like eBay for most other countries), or on small ads platforms like OLX (which is, I believe, active in some other countries too; its equivalents in Germany would be eBay-Kleinanzeigen and Quoka.de). There are also websites dedicated for cars only, but they are not so popular just now as in the past, maybe except OtoMoto.pl, which has an agreement with Allegro, so that Allegro shows also the offers from OtoMoto in its search results.

In the past, people used either small ads in local newspapers, or advertisements hung just in the town, or ones placed in the car window.

Concerning the payment, people pay by cash because it's just most convenient. You go to see the car, and if you decide to buy it, you can just pay for it. You could easily do it by a bank transfer (which is nowadays usually without any surcharge if you do it online), but then it takes some hours before the money reach the seller (or if you do it on Friday afternoon, it will reach the target on Monday), and before that, the transfer can be cancelled in the bank. The problem is that the official state-managed platform through which the banks exchange the money between each other, called ELIXIR, transfers the money in so called sessions, so the transfer you order must first wait from the outgoing session of your bank, then for the incoming session of the target bank. You can also use an "immediate transfer" offered by some banks, which exploits either the new ExpressELIXIR system, or an external company which have accounts in many banks and so it allows realizing immediate transfers, but then, there is a surcharge. Not a big one - but still people prefer cash. Maybe because when someone holds cash in his hand, he can be certain that he has it, without a more complicated procedure and checking his bank account. There are also still quite many people who don't use online banking, so they would have to go to a bank to verify if they got the money.

In Poland, if you buy a defective car even from a private person, there is still the consumer protection law that protects you. They are limited if you compare it with the rights you have when you buy something from a company, and they are more difficult to enforce, but it's not impossible and I know people who made use of them having bought a really defective second-hand car.
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Old November 25th, 2017, 02:06 PM   #37536
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A German town suffering seriously from a botched geothermal drilling project

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Old November 25th, 2017, 11:18 PM   #37537
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From a videoblog of a cyclist from the Tricity in Poland:



A situation in Gdynia, Zwycięstwa Avenue.

"I only wanted to ride forward".

The cyclist starts on an asphalt cycle path of quite a good quality. Then - translating the text from the video:

"End of the cycle path, one has to cycle on the roadway".

Then:

"Cycle path appears, but it starts on the sidewalk /without a possibility of entering it from the roadway/. One has to continue on the roadway."

If someone doesn't know or it's different in his country, it's worth noticing here that it's illegal in Poland to cycle on the sidewalk, except for some exceptional cases, none of which takes place here.

"Here it's possible to enter it legally, but very slowly. I slowed down the trolleybus behind me a little bit."

The standards of the cycle path are low. It's made of sidewalk bricks and borders directly with the sidewalk, so the pedestrians are likely to walk on it by mistake.

"My favorite cycling sidewalk."

The cycle path changes into sidewalk. Luckily, into one signed so that it's legal to cycle on it - but still it's a place where the cyclist is obliged to give way to the pedestrians.

The cycling sidewalk ends... at a place where a one-way side street starts, and furthermore, this sidewalk continues with a zebra crossing. It's illegal in Poland to cycle along a zebra crossing. Plus to continue cycling along the same street, you have to ignore the one-way street in order to be able to return onto the roadway of the street you want to continue cycling on.

"The drivers are used to sidewalk cyclists /frequent view on Polish sidewalks, even though illegal/, so they are careful and give way to me. Meanwhile, I land on a right-turn lane".

The cyclists manages to enter the roadway more or less legally, but he still has to give way to the cars on the roadway.

"On the other side of the street a cycle path appears, onto which I can't enter".

According to the Polish law, it's obligatory to use the cycle path if it's present. It doesn't matter, on which side of the street it is. But what in such a not infrequent situation, when there is a cycle path, but there is no way of entering it?

"Adhering to the mandatory sign, I am breaking the law".

The cyclist has to enter the cycle path, which eventually appears even on his side and it's technically possible to enter it, but the horizontal signage is such that he has to either cross a double solid line, or ride along a zebra crossing to enter it. Both things are illegal.

Before the traffic lights, there is a hand/footrail, helping the cyclist wait for the green light without a need of placing one foot on the ground or doing a standstill. At least one point in plus.

"Is it a cycle path?"

There is a nice asphalt lane standing out from the sidewalk, evidently designed for the cyclists, but it's not signed as a cycle path...



The life of a cyclist in Poland is often very harsh. The authorities are trying to facilitate cycling in the cities, but they do it in such an ineffective way, that they make it actually yet more difficult, when they build cycling paths which are uncomfortable, not connected to roadways in the places where they start or end and they are often located only on one side of the road.

How is it in your countries? I know that for example, Netherlands is known for its cyclist-friendliness, but when I was in Germany - in most cases, the infrastructure was quite cyclist-friendly, but there were also cases when it wasn't.

But how is it in other countries, especially in the other ones than those which first come to your mind when you think about cycling?

Last edited by Kpc21; November 25th, 2017 at 11:23 PM.
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Old November 26th, 2017, 01:10 AM   #37538
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Kpc21 View Post
How is it in your countries? I know that for example, Netherlands is known for its cyclist-friendliness, but when I was in Germany - in most cases, the infrastructure was quite cyclist-friendly, but there were also cases when it wasn't.

But how is it in other countries, especially in the other ones than those which first come to your mind when you think about cycling?
In Slovakia an ordinary driver identifies the following causes (read "enemies") of their time loss caused by a congestion (sorted by importance):
1. Public transport (is slow, is getting in way, they have stupid bus lanes, only asocial people use it),
2. Pedestrians (stupid zebra crossings, side-walks that could have been used for parking, etc.)
3. Cyclists (are overtaking congestions, always cut in other cars).
4. Other drivers (these jerks had to use public transport, go by walk or ride a bike).



Anyway, for three years I sat at the MoT in an office with the so-called national cycling ambassador. The cycling, but also the whole topic concerning traffic calming, public transport, walking, etc., is a very popular, but also despicable (for some people).

First a lot of people, even decision-makers, politicians or specialists do not see the difference between cycling tourism and cycling transport.

The hear about the European mobility week, put some sport equipment, helmet and sit on a bike to demonstrate they support this action. It is completely wrong.

I was a teamleader of the unit with the ambasador, we made a lot of tour de Slovakia with regional and communal delegates and the reactions were different.

Some are very aware of that and support the cycling transport (e.g. commuting). They do traffic reducing, traffic calming, BUS lane constructing, pedestrian crossings, and similar measures.

Then there are some that are aware of that pretty well, but they are afraid of the future voters. So they talk about these measures a lot but when it comes to implementation they do them partially. It sometimes lead to wrong consequences and sabotages the whole purpose.

And at last, there are completely stupid politicians that see cars only.

The modal split (in terms of cycling transport, not tourism) is 2 % in case of passenger kilometres (more objective) and 7 % in terms of number of trips.

Here are some of our ministers during the mobility week (minister of transport and construction, ministress of agriculture and regional development, minister of defence, deputy prime minister):



Only the first one understood the mobility week correctly (given his outfit). I told the PR department not to give him a tracksuit.
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Old November 26th, 2017, 02:03 AM   #37539
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So you suffer exactly the same problems as we in Poland

This minister in suit, not tracksuit, wears a suit, but he rides a mountain bike (or a trekking one, I am not sure), which still can be associated with cycling tourism instead of cycling transport

This woman in helmet on a folding bike looks better in these terms.

But if the cycling infrastructure in cities looks in Slovakia similarly to Poland, then an MTB may still be a better choice than a typical city bike, even for using the bike for transport.

And if you can have only a single bike (for not willing to spend money for two, or just for lack of storage room - while living in an apartment, storing the bike is always a problem), then you have to go for a compromise, and then a trekking bike may be a good choice.

What is this man in tracksuit riding? Is it a bike or a scooter?

Last edited by Kpc21; November 26th, 2017 at 02:11 AM.
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Old November 26th, 2017, 11:23 AM   #37540
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Kpc21 View Post
So you suffer exactly the same problems as we in Poland

This minister in suit, not tracksuit, wears a suit, but he rides a mountain bike (or a trekking one, I am not sure), which still can be associated with cycling tourism instead of cycling transport

This woman in helmet on a folding bike looks better in these terms.

But if the cycling infrastructure in cities looks in Slovakia similarly to Poland, then an MTB may still be a better choice than a typical city bike, even for using the bike for transport.

And if you can have only a single bike (for not willing to spend money for two, or just for lack of storage room - while living in an apartment, storing the bike is always a problem), then you have to go for a compromise, and then a trekking bike may be a good choice.

What is this man in tracksuit riding? Is it a bike or a scooter?


Yeah, but I do not take the bicycle type as a problem. Wearing a suit and lacking a helmet (that is not mandatory for 10+ yrs old bikers within a built-up area) is a good signal that biking to work/school is not a sport. This should be the message.

Helmet may save your life, but generally, drivers of passenger cars tend to be more ignorant towards well equipped bikers (wearing a helmet, protectors, special tracksuit) than more vulnerable bikers (lady wearing an office blouse with skirt). Also, generally, ladies refuse to bike as long as they are forced to wear a helmet - because it usually damages their haircut.

But yeah, folding bike looks much better than the mtb one.

About the infrastructure. A lot of people, a lot of decision makers do not understand the basic rules:

1. Most of commuter bikers would not exceed the 5 km distance. However, some (wannabe non-tourist) cycling path are currently being built, e.g along rivers. We are now building a cycling paths for instance connecting 10 km apart municipalities (with population of 500 people) that are segregated, thus expensive, with a positive impact for how many people? 50? This money could have been spent within a cities to apply the traffic-calming policy with a positive impact for thousands of people.

2. Segregated cycling path is not a way. Nobody would use that cycling paths due to at least two essential reasons: they are not the shortest and less time-consuming routes; and they are not maintained during the winter season.

I am really sad about this. Slovakia receives 83 million € within EU funds over the Integrated regional operated programme for cycling infrastructure. There were some call-for-proposals and most of money are now allocated to stupid projects like 60 km segregated cycling path between "on the verge of the world municipality" to "some small district city with no traffic issues" instead of severe transport bottlenecks.

We will never have that amount of money again. This is the waste of opportunity. Sadly the MoT is not in charge of this programme. Municipalities do not want to do a traffic calming because brand new cycling path is "more visible" in terms of earned political points. And does not affect the individual car transport (thus win-win, at least from their perspective)
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