daily menu » rate the banner | guess the city | one on oneforums map | privacy policy | DMCA | news magazine | posting guidelines

Go Back   SkyscraperCity > Photo Forums > Urban Showcase

Urban Showcase Show your selfmade photos



Global Announcement

As a general reminder, please respect others and respect copyrights. Go here to familiarize yourself with our posting policy.


Reply

 
Thread Tools
Old September 23rd, 2008, 07:21 AM   #321
flar
____
 
flar's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2006
Location: Ottawa-Gatineau
Posts: 1,073
Likes (Received): 56

SPECIAL FEATURE: The lost stone town of Hamilton

When thinking of stone towns in Ontario, the first that come to mind are Guelph, Kingston, or St. Mary's. Hamilton might have been
among them if it hadn't experienced explosive growth in the latter part of the nineteenth century. In her book "A Heritage of Stone",
Nina Perkins Chapple writes: "the picturesque stone town of the 1850s soon was over-trumped by the robust, High Victorian city of
the 1890s, which, in turn, was swallowed up by the expanded, modernized city of the twentieth century...Hamilton would appear at
first glance to have lost its 1850s stone heritage; closer inspection reveals a remarkable resource which, although reduced and
scattered, includes some of the most exceptional stone buildings ever built in southwestern Ontario."

In this tour, I search for the remains of this lost stone heritage. All of these buildings are located in central Hamilton, sometimes hidden
among highrise apartment buildings or in Victorian neighbourhoods.
flar no está en línea   Reply With Quote

Sponsored Links
Old September 23rd, 2008, 07:22 AM   #322
flar
____
 
flar's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2006
Location: Ottawa-Gatineau
Posts: 1,073
Likes (Received): 56


Burlington Terrace, c. 1850s


Slainte Irish Pub, Corktown


Sandyford Place, 1858. The finest stone rowhouse in Canada west of Montreal and one of only a few surviving rowhouses built for the wealthy.
It was nearly demolished for an apartment building


Whitehern, a classical revival mansion built c. 1850 and home to three generations of the McQuesten family






Inside Whitehern
flar no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old September 23rd, 2008, 07:22 AM   #323
flar
____
 
flar's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2006
Location: Ottawa-Gatineau
Posts: 1,073
Likes (Received): 56

A stone row on James Street South. Stone rows like this once lined many Hamilton streets




Commercial buildings near Gore Park






Christ's Church Cathedral, 1835, cathedral church of the Anglican Diocese of Niagara.


Inside Christ's Church:


Bay Street South Terrace, 1857




Park and Herkimer, c. 1860
flar no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old September 23rd, 2008, 07:23 AM   #324
flar
____
 
flar's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2006
Location: Ottawa-Gatineau
Posts: 1,073
Likes (Received): 56

MacNab Street Presbyterian Church, c. 1850s




Manse, c. 1860








James Street Baptist Church, 1878-82


flar no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old September 23rd, 2008, 07:24 AM   #325
flar
____
 
flar's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2006
Location: Ottawa-Gatineau
Posts: 1,073
Likes (Received): 56

This is Amisfield, once a stately castle on James Street South

Photo from Hamilton Public Library Special Collections hosted at http://www.raisethehammer.org/index.asp?id=516.

Today, Amisfield is completely surrounded:
"marred, obliterated and degraded, Rastrick's masterpiece stands in ignominy and shame."
from Victorian Architecture in Hamilton (1967) by Alexander Gordon McKay



Fearman House, 1863


Try saying "Pheasant Plucker" three times fast. This building is lonely today but at one time was surrounded by other stone buildings


Commercial on John Street South


Roach House, 1854, oringinally the home of George Roach, mayor and director of the Bank of Hamilton
flar no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old September 23rd, 2008, 07:25 AM   #326
flar
____
 
flar's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2006
Location: Ottawa-Gatineau
Posts: 1,073
Likes (Received): 56

Hess Village


Bishophurst, 1877, currently the home of CHCH Television


This building is being renovated into a luxury restaurant and bar with rooftop patio


St. Paul's Presbyterian Church, 1854-7, featuring 180 foot stone spire




Originally the Sun Life Assurance Building, 1899, later the upper floors were added and it became the Federal Building




Commercial warehouse, c. 1856. This building houses Coppley, Noyes and Randall, men's suit manufacturers


The Inglewood, c. 1850


Thomas Building, c. 1850s, slated for demolition. I believe the aluminum to the left covers the rest of the stone facade


Duke Street semi-detached house, c. 1840s


Ballahinich, 1853
flar no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old September 23rd, 2008, 07:26 AM   #327
flar
____
 
flar's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2006
Location: Ottawa-Gatineau
Posts: 1,073
Likes (Received): 56

Rock Castle, c. 1848




Hereford House, 1853


Somehow this lone house survives in a sea of commie blocks




Church of the Ascension, 1850






flar no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old September 23rd, 2008, 07:26 AM   #328
flar
____
 
flar's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2006
Location: Ottawa-Gatineau
Posts: 1,073
Likes (Received): 56

Central Public School, 1853, first large graded public school in British North America




The Stable houses at Dundurn Castle


Custom House, 1858, one of Canada's oldest surviving public buildings
flar no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old September 23rd, 2008, 07:55 AM   #329
xzmattzx
Philly sports fan
 
xzmattzx's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2004
Location: Wilmington, Delaware
Posts: 15,648
Likes (Received): 4268

Quote:
Originally Posted by flar View Post
There is some Tudor Revival in St. Clair, generally the neighbourhood is considered Edwardian (early 1900s). It's supposed to look English and is similar to Westdale (page 5).
Thanks for clearing that up. I actually don't know anything about architecture, so I was half-guessing. I think that the exposed wood beams is a feature of Tudor Revival, but I could definitely be wrong.
xzmattzx no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old September 26th, 2008, 01:52 AM   #330
Steeltown
Registered User
 
Steeltown's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2004
Location: Hamilton
Posts: 3,545
Likes (Received): 143

I love the stone heritage in Hamilton. I wonder if a big chunk of the stone facade are from the Niagara Escarpment? I think a few buildings in the Stinson's hood are.
Steeltown no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old September 29th, 2008, 05:34 AM   #331
felcap
Registered User
 
Join Date: Sep 2008
Posts: 4
Likes (Received): 0

South Central Gems.

Thank you for posting the Delaware / St Clair Heritage area. My wife and I have lived in this area for eight years. Itís a very good area. Pride of ownership shows, as home owners care. You have very friendly people that live here. We live in the second pic house after the plaque pic in the st Clair thread. Red brick home with the black wrought iron fence. Itís known as the Moore Manor named after its first owner, (Elsie Marjorie Moore) many of the homes were named after their original owners. The area offers more than just distinctive homes. There are four (4) schools, post office, restaurants, Pharmacy, and your neighbourhood convenience store. Not to mention you can walk to downtown core in 15-20 minutes. One of the best reasons to live here is its location. Home values in the area have increased. Homes that were converted to rentals 20 years ago are bought up and turned back to single family. Most homes have doubled and some tripled in value most of the homes that do come up for sale are sold fairly quickly.... usually Toronto people. Thanks again.
felcap no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old September 29th, 2008, 07:21 AM   #332
flar
____
 
flar's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2006
Location: Ottawa-Gatineau
Posts: 1,073
Likes (Received): 56

Quote:
Originally Posted by xzmattzx View Post
Thanks for clearing that up. I actually don't know anything about architecture, so I was half-guessing. I think that the exposed wood beams is a feature of Tudor Revival, but I could definitely be wrong.
I'm no authority on architecture either. The wood beams are definitely a big part of the Tudor style but Tudor Revival doesn't have to include that feature. Another thing distinctive about the Tudor style is a steeply pitched roof often with one side sloping further down, or curved at the end, and also distinctive chimneys, so I think this might be considered Tudor Revival:



This one is definately Tudor Revival without the half timbering:



Tudor Revival I guess could be considered Edwardian since it was popular around that period (and later, into the 1930s-40s), but I think what is most associated with Edwardian architecture is that it adds some classical elements and is less elaborate than Victorian. I think this is a good example of an Edwardian house:

__________________
My blog | My photos
flar no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old September 29th, 2008, 07:26 AM   #333
flar
____
 
flar's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2006
Location: Ottawa-Gatineau
Posts: 1,073
Likes (Received): 56

Quote:
Originally Posted by felcap View Post
Thank you for posting the Delaware / St Clair Heritage area. My wife and I have lived in this area for eight years. It’s a very good area. Pride of ownership shows, as home owners care. You have very friendly people that live here. We live in the second pic house after the plaque pic in the st Clair thread. Red brick home with the black wrought iron fence. It’s known as the Moore Manor named after its first owner, (Elsie Marjorie Moore) many of the homes were named after their original owners. The area offers more than just distinctive homes. There are four (4) schools, post office, restaurants, Pharmacy, and your neighbourhood convenience store. Not to mention you can walk to downtown core in 15-20 minutes. One of the best reasons to live here is its location. Home values in the area have increased. Homes that were converted to rentals 20 years ago are bought up and turned back to single family. Most homes have doubled and some tripled in value most of the homes that do come up for sale are sold fairly quickly.... usually Toronto people. Thanks again.
I am always pleased when homes like these are purchased by people who appreciate them.
__________________
My blog | My photos
flar no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old September 30th, 2008, 05:56 AM   #334
Air33
Registered User
 
Air33's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2008
Posts: 7
Likes (Received): 0

Hamilton is absolutely an amazing city. I started coming to Hamilton to visit for the many abandonments it has from bygone industry -- but found that it had fantastic nooks and crannies apart from the hojo (Harry's Stinson's most recent redevelopment failure) and lister block.
Air33 no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old October 3rd, 2008, 07:51 AM   #335
flar
____
 
flar's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2006
Location: Ottawa-Gatineau
Posts: 1,073
Likes (Received): 56

Here's interesting building in East Hamilton. This is Greenhill Place, a Corbusian Unite d'Habitation style building. You can see how long the building is, and at 16 storeys, it's monstrous (there are two storeys between each balconey). It's even bigger than that, there is another wing, it's shaped like a T. I wonder how many people live in it?



__________________
My blog | My photos
flar no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old October 3rd, 2008, 08:30 AM   #336
Taller, Better
Administrator
 
Taller, Better's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2005
Location: Toronto
Posts: 71,070
Likes (Received): 12278

Flar, you really outdid yourself this time... your Lost Stone Town tour had me glued to my screen... greedily savouring every succulent photo as it came up. How do they access Amisfield? Is it open to the public? What a crying shame to have it boxed in...
they should annex the land and bulldoze down all the crap around it.
__________________
'Make no little plans. They have no magic to stir men's blood."
-architect Daniel Burnman
Taller, Better no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old October 3rd, 2008, 05:10 PM   #337
flar
____
 
flar's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2006
Location: Ottawa-Gatineau
Posts: 1,073
Likes (Received): 56

Today Amisfield is divided up into apartments. Overall it's quite rundown but it's interesting to look in the windows as there are still some nice details inside. The buildings in front don't actually touch Amisfiled, they are contoured around them with a small clearance. Some of the turrets and other adornments have been removed (probably destroyed):


A side view. It doesn't look so grand without its turrets.


I also found out from someone on SSP that the building in the picture below was built using stone from the wall that once surrounded the Amisfield property. This building is attached to Amisfield.


Amisfield has been neglected and degraded over and over again:




Here's a an article about Amisfield's architect, Frederick James Rastrick, who designed several of the buildings shown in this tour:
http://www.raisethehammer.org/index.asp?id=516
flar no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old October 3rd, 2008, 05:44 PM   #338
Taller, Better
Administrator
 
Taller, Better's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2005
Location: Toronto
Posts: 71,070
Likes (Received): 12278

That is a crying shame... it was a lovely old house.
__________________
'Make no little plans. They have no magic to stir men's blood."
-architect Daniel Burnman
Taller, Better no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old October 3rd, 2008, 06:05 PM   #339
christos-greece
Moderator!
 
christos-greece's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2008
Posts: 176,564
Likes (Received): 244387

Very nice pics
__________________
Urban Showcase: Athens Kalamata Trikala Thessaloniki
Cityscapes: Paris Barcelona Dubai, U.A.E. Monte Carlo, Monaco
General photography: Castles of France - Chateau de France and, since May of '08: Greece!
christos-greece está en línea ahora   Reply With Quote
Old October 3rd, 2008, 10:17 PM   #340
xzmattzx
Philly sports fan
 
xzmattzx's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2004
Location: Wilmington, Delaware
Posts: 15,648
Likes (Received): 4268

Bump, time for a new neighborhood.

Greenhill Place looks ugly but interesting. It looks like an unfinished building.
xzmattzx no está en línea   Reply With Quote


Reply

Thread Tools

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Related topics on SkyscraperCity


All times are GMT +2. The time now is 08:23 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.11 Beta 4
Copyright ©2000 - 2018, vBulletin Solutions Inc.
Feedback Buttons provided by Advanced Post Thanks / Like (Pro) - vBulletin Mods & Addons Copyright © 2018 DragonByte Technologies Ltd.

vBulletin Optimisation provided by vB Optimise (Pro) - vBulletin Mods & Addons Copyright © 2018 DragonByte Technologies Ltd.

SkyscraperCity ☆ In Urbanity We trust ☆ about us | privacy policy | DMCA policy

tech management by Sysprosium