daily menu » rate the banner | guess the city | one on oneforums map | privacy policy | DMCA | news magazine

Go Back   SkyscraperCity > European Forums > UK & Ireland Architecture Forums > Projects and Construction > Manchester Metro Area > Greater Manchester Transport Projects

Greater Manchester Transport Projects Transport Matters For Greater Manchester and Surrounding Areas



Reply

 
Thread Tools Rating: Thread Rating: 410 votes, 5.00 average.
Old July 21st, 2005, 08:38 AM   #21
VansTripp
BANNED
 
VansTripp's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2004
Location: LA/Trussville
Posts: 2,386
Likes (Received): 2

Quote:
Originally Posted by Trammy
LA - from memory, the electric comes off the National Electric grid for Merolink - and as the UK is still (for the time being) relatively ok with gas supplies in the North Sea, our electric costs have not risen in the same way as other parts of the world.

Must be remembered that the cost of the alternatives will also be rising (probably faster) than for the electrically powered trams - petrol and disel are now both above 90p / litre (about £4 / gallon - $7.5 / gallon), which is historically very high.

It wouldn't surprise me if Serco (Metrolink operators) have a set price for electric - that could have been agreed well before the rise in energy prices.

A couple of years ago we had petrol strikes, it became very hard to get fuel for cars, the passenger numbers on systems like Metrolink rocketed, however, after a while it was becoming difficult for the drivers to get to the depot, to driver the trams.
I see. Gas Price in CA is so expensive at $2.20 per gallon to $2.89 per gallon.
VansTripp no está en línea   Reply With Quote

Sponsored Links
 
Old July 21st, 2005, 08:42 AM   #22
Trammy
Registered User
 
Join Date: Jun 2005
Posts: 155
Likes (Received): 0

That is one of the problems a good proportion of the world has a problem with the US - you have huge gas (petrol) gusseling cars that are contributing far more than their fair share to global polution - and nothing is done to discourage people from using more and more petrol.

See Kyoto.
Trammy no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old July 21st, 2005, 11:30 AM   #23
Jasper
Registered User
 
Join Date: Nov 2004
Location: Manchester & Hackney
Posts: 131
Likes (Received): 4

Quote:
Originally Posted by Trammy
LA - from memory, the electric comes off the National Electric grid for Merolink - and as the UK is still (for the time being) relatively ok with gas supplies in the North Sea, our electric costs have not risen in the same way as other parts of the world.
Indeed you're right as usual Trammy. The power is fed from the local 11 kV three phase grid and transformed and rectified from a.c. to 750 V d.c. at substations. There's one underneath the brick viaduct as the tram rises up from St Peters Square to GMEX, before the turquoise bridge over Gt Bridgewater St. They will have a contract with an electricity supplier, and I guess will pay around 4p/kWh - around half domestic rates.

.
Jasper no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old July 25th, 2005, 09:14 PM   #24
SleepyOne
Registered User
 
Join Date: Jan 2005
Posts: 3,091
Likes (Received): 1

There should be a separate thread to discuss city-regional governance as its such an live topic throughout the country at the moment.

Thought Id post it in here as there is an extremely relevant passage relating to the present furore over Tram systems.

Quote:
Cities scent new spending powers

Joey Gardiner, Regeneration & Renewal - 22 July 2005
New spending powers could be devolved to Britain's largest cities under plans being worked up by the Government and city leaders.


Sheffield City Council chief executive Sir Bob Kerslake told Regeneration & Renewal that the eight core cities were discussing with the Office of the Deputy Prime Minister a "new settlement" which could see cities such as Leeds, Manchester and Birmingham given much greater financial autonomy.

Such a change would further cement the role of cities at the heart of the ODPM's economic development policy, which has already been enhanced by the Northern Way growth plan.

Kerslake said the deal, which would build on the pilots of Local Area Agreements, which offer councils increased flexibility over how they spend government funds, had not yet been signed, but was an "emerging dialogue" with the Government.

He said he wanted to see a system where decisions on new tram systems were made in the affected city rather than by central government, and where cities could "take charge" of the skills agenda.

He told Regeneration & Renewal: "This is going to be like Local Area Agreements, but will go further. We need some form of new understanding with Government. What can't be devolved needs to be aligned with city priorities."

He added that, if successful, the settlement could ultimately be extended to smaller cities and large towns.

The news follows comments made by local government minister David Miliband to Regeneration & Renewal earlier this month that councils in large conurbations could be offered joint funding pots (R&R, 1 July, p1).

Speaking at the Core Cities conference last week, Miliband confirmed that the Government was talking to the core cities about new powers, but said no final decision had been reached about what those would be. He said that this discussion will include a mini urban summit in each of the core cities - Manchester, Birmingham, Bristol, Newcastle, Nottingham, Leeds, Liverpool and Sheffield - to be held by the end of the year. These would be used to identify what "new tools" city councils needed, he said.

Miliband said: "We're on a journey here, but there's no easy answer.

We need to see where devolution, where local people determine what and how things happen locally, and where decentralisation, where they just look at the how, is appropriate."
SleepyOne no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old July 29th, 2005, 10:21 PM   #25
SleepyOne
Registered User
 
Join Date: Jan 2005
Posts: 3,091
Likes (Received): 1

From the council's executive mintes. The wheels are turning, all be it slowly but in the right direction at least.

01 june 05:

Quote:
Exe/05/78 Metrolink/Integrated Transport Strategy
A report of the Chief Executive was considered updating members on Metrolink and the Integrated Transport Strategy for Greater Manchester. The bid for essential maintenance/upgrade works to the existing Metrolink system as a first call on the £520m was submitted at the end of January. On 8th April an updated The ITS examines in detail the problems and issues across Greater Manchester and sets out proposals for improving outcomes by making existing resources work harder and through Best Value procurement. The document sets out thinking in relation to transport strategy across Greater Manchester on a segment by segment basis setting out an outline strategy for the next 15 years and a detailed plan for the next 5, including the four Metrolink lines.

A constructive dialogue has been established with the Department for Transport since the strategy was submitted and regular meetings are now taking place. A process of joint working based around the core work streams has been agreed in principle, which would intend to move the process forward to the point of agreeing the strategy for starting the procurement of Metrolink Phase 3. This includes an initial timetable and resource map to March 2006, outlining reporting structures and the definition of key early tasks. There is now a clearer commitment from the Government to Metrolink. The LTP strategy for Greater Manchester is built around the expansion of four lines. The question to be resolved with Government now appears to be how this can best be delivered. It had always been the intention that Phase 3 expansion would involve a cumulative approach to delivery within an overall agreed funding framework and the discussions, which are taking place reflect these requirements and involve determining the most efficient procurement strategy. It is now recognised that the original approach to procurement was not now the most efficient, resulting in increased costs. More efficient systems are being developed looking at the selection of one overall operator, with the individual lines being procured separately.

A procurement strategy options paper was included in the Integrated Transport Strategy. This is seen as a major step forward and more detailed working sessions on this are now underway. The strategy also emphasises the importance of achieving a high level of integration between different transport modes and on securing maximum benefit from investment in public transport. Amongst a number of options, the development of segment partnerships is being investigated as a means of engaging all key stakeholders in ensuring that transport planning is more effectively related to the delivery of a wider set of outcomes than has been the case in the past, with a clear focus upon gearing investment and measures to support, broader economic competitiveness and the social inclusion agenda.

Decision
1. To note that following the submission of the Integrated Transport Strategy (ITS) for Greater Manchester in April, constructive dialogue has been established with Government officials and a provisional joint work programme has been agreed as set out in the report.

2. To note that, following the General Election Alistair Darling MP remains Secretary of State for Transport, Tony McNulty MP has been replaced as Minister of State by Dr Stephen Ladyman MP and new Parliamentary Under-Secretary Derek Twigg MP will be responsible for light rail.

3. To note the request by the Chair of GMPTA to meet the Secretary of State for Transport with the Leader and Deputy Leader of AGMA.

4. To note that following further meetings on the funding bid for the Metrolink Phase 1/2 improvement programme, it is understood DfT officials intend to put a submission before the new Minister by the end of May.

5. To request that regular progress reports continue to be submitted.

Councillor Judge declared a personal and prejudicial interest in this item and left the meeting during its discussion.

29 June 05:

Quote:
Exe/05/98 Metrolink Phase 3 - The Southern Corridor
A report of the Chief Executive was considered updating members of the conclusion of a review of the public transport options for the Southern Corridor and to establish the Executive's preferred way forward.

Following the decision of the Secretary of State for Transport not to approve funding for Phase 3 of Metrolink because of concerns about rising cost, extensive discussions have been taking place with the Department of Transport leading to a bid for essential maintenance upgrade works to Phase 1 and the submission of an Integrated Transport Strategy for Greater Manchester based on the three Metrolink corridors

The DfT, however, remain to be convinced about the affordability of light rail both generally and in respect of elements of the Metrolink Phase 3 programme, as is evident by the recent announcement by the Secretary of State on the future of Mersey Tram.

South Manchester is one of the most economically vibrant and active areas in the North West, whilst at the same time containing some highly deprived neighbourhoods. Both the airport and South Manchester economy are forecast to continue to grow over the next decade and it is vital that the benefits of this growth are more systematically targeted at and captured by local communities. The need for better transport links has been consistently highlighted as a contributory factor in terms of improving current levels of economic and social exclusion with improved connectivity being critical to delivering regeneration objectives in these areas. For this reason the Southern Corridor was proposed as a route for Metrolink within the Phase 3 expansion programme.

It became clear, however, that even prior to the announcement there were particular issues requiring resolution about the affordability of this element, with the key problem being that the overall financial and economic performance of this line was not seen to be optimised. This was brought into sharper focus by the fact that the line was not seen as attractive by bidders and was not a priority for them to build. Taking into account the consistent requirement by the Government that affordability must continue to shape the Department's policy in relation to light rail, a working group has been established to explore a range of potential public transport solutions for this corridor and compare these to the existing Metrolink proposals. The review tested the full range of solutions including stand alone and various combinations of bus, segregated bus ways, tram train and light rail. Alternative primary routes were also looked at. The review came to the conclusion, which has been independently verified that Metrolink offers the optimum public transport solution for the Southern Corridor. It outperforms by a considerable margin all other options and is the only solution capable of meeting both capacity and cost benefit requirements. The review corroborates the view, which we have long maintained that other public transport solutions are inferior and unsupportable. In all tests, the existing proposal for Metrolink between Trafford Bar and Roundthorn performed well but south of Roundthorn three alternative routing options were considered because of specific concerns about cost benefit performance on the existing routing The existing Wythenshawe loop option is the most comprehensive but also the most expensive of the three and the very high capital costs do not bring significant additional benefit. This could alter if Davenport Green was developed comprehensively for employment uses and there is a strong argument for safeguarding the western alignment if this were not pursued at present.

Of the other two options an eastern loop and a central line, the eastern loop is estimated to reduce capital costs by over £40m and is an excellent cost benefit performer, in fact one of the best of the whole expansion package. It also has the benefit of over the central line option of maintaining a large part of the existing route and therefore having no requirement for new powers.

We have welcomed the outcome of the review, which demonstrates clearly the essential need of Metrolink to Wythenshawe. It is clear, however, that the financial and economic performance of the existing proposal is such that in present circumstances it cannot continue to be seen as the best solution and we have agreed that option 2 should be progressed as a fixed component of the Greater Manchester's Light Rail Strategy for implementation as quickly as possible with the existing alignment of the Western loop being safeguarded. This will put the Metrolink extension to Wythenshawe which is the most cost effective of the three routes and the strongest in terms of deliverability.

We recognise furthermore that transport links need to be strengthened within West Wythenshawe and especially to the Hospital, where regardless of Metrolink, public transport links to and within the site need to be improved as an immediate priority. The Chair of the PTA and Chief Executive of the PTA attended our meeting and outlined discussions, which are taking place with Wythenshawe Hospital about improving public transport links and we have asked that the Officers work with the Hospital Trust and the PTA/E to help improve access as soon as possible. The Secretary of State has stated that he will make a decision imminently on the Phase 1/2 bid and it is the PTE intention to engage with the Department of Transport on a revised Metrolink procurement package over the coming weeks. It is critical that an early view is taken on the preferred Southern Corridor solution and a report incorporating our views on this will be submitted to the PTE on 28th July when it will be considering the options.

Decision
1. To note that in response to DfT's continuing concerns about affordability, a review of the Southern Corridor element of the Metrolink Phase 3 programme has been undertaken, which tested the full range of potential public transport solutions as set out in the report.

2. To welcome the review findings, which were independently verified, and confirm that Metrolink offers the optimum public transport solution for the Southern Corridor. Metrolink outperforms all other options and is the only solution capable of meeting both capacity and cost-benefit requirements.

3. To determine, that in the light of costs, benefits and opportunities related to these Metrolink options brought forward as a result of the review, Option 2, the Eastern Loop, represents in the present circumstances the preferred solution particularly having regard to certainty and affordability, and that the PTA/E be requested to continue to take all necessary steps to protect the alignment of the western part of the existing alignment, and to explore ways of improving connectivity to Wythenshawe Hospital and from the District Centre direct to the Airport in the short and longer term. The action to improve transport links to and within the Wythenshawe Hospital site to be progressed immediately in full collaboration with GMPTE and other stakeholders.

4. To note that a report on the Southern Corridor options, incorporating the views of the Executive, will be considered by GMPTA on 28th July and that AGMA Leaders will also be briefed on the proposals.

5. To agree, subject to a clear view being reached by the end of July, that the Chief Executive (in his capacity as Clerk to GMPTA) be authorised to work with the Director General of the GMPTE to commission a further detailed technical and financial appraisal of the preferred solution to be completed as quickly as possible in order to inform ongoing dialogue with DfT on the procurement package for Metrolink Phase 3.

6. To request that a further progress report be submitted to the next meeting of the Executive.
SleepyOne no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old July 31st, 2005, 11:27 PM   #26
jrb
10th February 2008
 
jrb's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2003
Location: Manchester
Posts: 30,564
Likes (Received): 2190

Has anyone noticed all the recent road/juction improvments taking place all over Manchester?

New junction layouts, lights, pedestrian crossings, road markings, bus lanes, etc, etc!

Wonder if theres a connection with the Metrolink bid?

Last edited by jrb; July 31st, 2005 at 11:40 PM.
jrb no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old August 1st, 2005, 01:27 PM   #27
EarlyBird
BАNNED
 
Join Date: Oct 2004
Location: Central Prezzagrad
Posts: 3,174
Likes (Received): 0

Quote:
Originally Posted by jrb
Has anyone noticed all the recent road/juction improvments taking place all over Manchester?

New junction layouts, lights, pedestrian crossings, road markings, bus lanes, etc, etc!

Wonder if theres a connection with the Metrolink bid?
It's happening in all the towns that are down for metrolink lines from what I can tell. Massive junction changes in Ashton and I've noticed some works starting in Oldham too.
EarlyBird no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old August 1st, 2005, 07:15 PM   #28
Farsight
Registered User
 
Join Date: Apr 2004
Posts: 3,489
Likes (Received): 131

Sorry to be cynical earlybird. But that £17 billion is coming from somewhere.

Quote:
London's transport system will also be upgraded over the next seven years with a £17 billion government investment strategy that will include a special rapid shuttle service that will ferry passengers at Games time from central London to the Olympic Park in just seven minutes.
Farsight no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old August 9th, 2005, 11:35 AM   #29
Metrolink
Registered User
 
Join Date: Aug 2005
Posts: 6,738
Likes (Received): 0

Metrolink

Guess who I am...

http://www.manchesteronline.co.uk/me...the_truth.html

Metrolink: The truth
David Ottewell


THE MANCHESTER Evening News can today unveil a dossier of secret documents that reveals the truth about the Metrolink extension.

Using Freedom of Information laws, we have obtained private letters and reports casting new light on the government's decision to axe the Big Bang - before massive public pressure forced them to put the money back on the table.

The M.E.N. can reveal:

The Department for Transport (DfT) was considering axing the Metrolink extension SIX MONTHS before it finally ditched the scheme.

Labour MPs privately warned Transport Secretary Alistair Darling of a "potentially disastrous" political fall-out in the run-up to the General Election.

Greater Manchester Passenger Transport Executive (GMPTE) was proposing a cut-price scheme, delaying the line to the airport until private funding could be found.

Manchester's top councillor wrote to MPs to say senior civil servants had revealed the government wanted to stop investing in trams altogether - something the DfT has never admitted.

Alistair Darling announced in July last year that £520m for new Metrolink lines was being withdrawn over fears that costs were spiralling. The decision was greeted with shock and outrage on all sides.

Homeowners and public bodies had in the previous few months spent millions of pounds on property and infrastructure along the three proposed routes - to the airport, Ashton and Oldham-Rochdale - on the understanding they were still going ahead.

Details

But now the M.E.N. can disclose details of two reports sent to Mr Darling from the civil servant in charge of local transport, calling into question the future of Metrolink.

The first was sent as early as January 7 last year, asking the Transport Secretary what to do about the extension "in the light of further cost increases since it was approved for funding in December 2002."

The timing is described as "pressing". The second, from March 8, again asks Mr Darling "whether to approve all or part" of the Big Bang, which was the name given to the plan to build lines to Ashton, Oldham-Rochdale and south Manchester in one contract.

In both cases the DfT has decided to censor the civil servant's recommendation before releasing the documents to the M.E.N. But on February 17, the same mandarin wrote to then transport minister Tony McNulty ahead of a meeting he was having with Greater Manchester MPs.

"Our current public position is that we are reconsidering the scheme in the light of the major cost increase," he wrote.

The DfT continued to insist last night no final decision was taken until just before Mr Darling's announcement.

A spokeswoman said: "Considersation was given to the future of the scheme throughout, in particular whether it could be delivered on budget.

"When it became clear the costs had spiralled, we had to take the difficult decision to revoke approval.

"The decision was taken when it was announced in July."

The two reports sent to Mr Darling also make clear the Greater Manchester Passenger Transport Executive was no longer planning to use the £520m to cover the cost of all three lines.

"The promoters' current proposals are for the Oldham-Rochdale line, the Ashton line plus the East Didsbury spur," said the March document.

Other papers in the dossier show how local MPs feared anger at the announcement could cost them their seats.

Decision

Eccles' MP Ian Stewart wrote to Mr Darling on August 8 on behalf of all Greater Manchester MPs, saying the reaction had been "possibly the most hostile reaction to a government decision which we have witnessed during our political careers".

He said: "The decision should, in our view, be the subject of urgent economic review if it is not to have potentially disastrous implications economically and politically."

There are also documents suggesting government officials were rethinking the future of trams nationwide - a charge repeatedly denied by the DfT.

A private letter from Manchester city council leader Richard Leese to all Greater Manchester's Labour MPs said: "We firmly believe, and senior civil servants have corroborated this, that there is a serious intention to marginalise light rail as a future investment option on the grounds of value for money."

Many papers - including minutes of meetings between senior politicians and ministers' letters - have been withheld because the DfT believes releasing them could "seriously impact on the policy-making process". The £520m funding for Metrolink was eventually put back on the table after a massive campaign, led by the M.E.N.

More than 40,000 people signed a petition we took to Downing Street, while thousands more gathered for a series of public protests. The GMPTE is working through proposals aimed at cutting the cost for all three lines, which rose to above £800m. Director general Chris Mulligan admitted last night that GMPTE had offered to go ahead with only two of the main lines, plus a spur to East Didsbury.

But he said that did not mean the airport line had been completely scrapped, just that it would be delayed until private funding could be arranged.

He said: "The DfT requested that we present them with several options. At the time, the passenger transport authority's preferred option was to proceed with the Oldham and Rochdale, Ashton under Lyne and East Didsbury lines. There were clear affordability issues with the South Manchester line which needed to be addressed - and which now have been.

"The South Manchester line is now the best performing of the full package. There was never any intention to drop the extension to Manchester Airport.

"This line was to be included in the Phase 3 contract.

"We intended to put together a funding package in partnership with third parties, including the airport."

The M.E.N. will be appealing over the DfT's decision to withhold parts or all of key documents.
Metrolink no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old August 9th, 2005, 11:36 AM   #30
Metrolink
Registered User
 
Join Date: Aug 2005
Posts: 6,738
Likes (Received): 0

http://www.manchesteronline.co.uk/me...snt_there.html

Flats demolished for tram line that isn't there
Clarissa Satchell
MILLIONS of pounds worth of work to prepare the way for Metrolink was going on while the government carried out its secret review into whether to axe the Big Bang.

People were forced to move out of their homes in Tameside, Oldham and Wythenshawe and £2.3m was spent on moving a school in Ashton under Lyne yards from its original site.

A main transmission pylon was relocated near Sale Water Park, a compulsory purchase order was served on a nearby farm and Sale Golf Club had to remodel several holes.

GMPTE had spent £200m preparing the way for Metrolink when the government announced the expansion plan was "not approved" in July 2004. Around £80m was spent on compensation and £120m on demolition and building work, with a further £100m committed for other works.

Thanks to a campaign spearheaded by the M.E.N., the government finally restored the £520m package originally promised at the end of last year and the scheme is once again moving forwards.

Demolished

But a couple forced to move out of their home while the review was underway said it was "disgraceful" there was no warning that the scheme could be axed. Elderly residents were forced to leave 24 flats in Wellington Road, Ashton, in March 2004, to make way for the planned line and the flats were demolished later that year.

Maureen Consiglio, 62, and her husband Salvatore, fought the proposals but were finally forced to leave, although they were rehoused by New Charter Housing.

Mrs Consiglio said: "I think it's disgusting. We were rushed out in the end but as it later turned out there was no need. Even now the land where the flats were is just standing empty, although at least they're saying now that it will come eventually. When, we don't know.

"It was especially unsettling for the older people to move so quickly and some of them don't go out any more because they don't know the area as well.

"When they announced Metrolink wasn't coming it was a big shock for us, all that upheaval for nothing. No one had ever warned us that might happen and nobody has ever said sorry to us."

It is understood that more than £300m has now been spent on preparation works.

Several contracts had already been signed when the government announced its decision last July.
Metrolink no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old August 9th, 2005, 11:42 AM   #31
jrb
10th February 2008
 
jrb's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2003
Location: Manchester
Posts: 30,564
Likes (Received): 2190

Alistair Darling?

I can smell the shit from here!
jrb no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old August 9th, 2005, 11:51 AM   #32
andysimo123
wind-up merchant
 
andysimo123's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2004
Posts: 15,963
Likes (Received): 45

What twats, you dont spend £300 million and then not finish the job.
andysimo123 no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old August 9th, 2005, 11:52 AM   #33
Metrolink
Registered User
 
Join Date: Aug 2005
Posts: 6,738
Likes (Received): 0

Interesting that the MEN is going big on this.

From what is being said we are going to get a decision on how the three lines will be funded by the end of the year (I suspect in the final week prior to the xmas recess), and a schedule for when each line will get built.

When I last spoke to someone about this they were more adamant than ever this will go ahead - the £102m for upgrade work is a huge boost - confidence is very high.

As a guess, I suspect we will see work on the Rochdale line starting at some point in 2007.

P.S.

New trams arriving autumn 2007 through to early 2008 - order going in later this year
Track renewal - out to tender soon, starting late 2006, completed by early 2008
New ticket machines summer 2007 to early 2008

Plenty more of dates for stuff that I cannot remeber just yet
Metrolink no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old August 9th, 2005, 11:56 AM   #34
Metrolink
Registered User
 
Join Date: Aug 2005
Posts: 6,738
Likes (Received): 0

andysimo - the local PTE and councillors are putting so much pressure onto the DfT to approve all this work it will go ahead.

The government are going to find it harder and harder to reject a project which is actually going ahead very slowly - have a look at the new £35m bridge being built in Central Business Park, linking the heavy rail line, the proposed new tram line and a bus interchange - all good stuff when actually built - and building it in this way means that there will be no option but to put trams down that route.

It is taking some balls by the PTE etc, but it seems to be working.

See the £102m announcement, and compare it to Leeds and Liverpool's current situation.
Metrolink no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old August 9th, 2005, 12:01 PM   #35
andysimo123
wind-up merchant
 
andysimo123's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2004
Posts: 15,963
Likes (Received): 45

I dont like it when it says "later in the year" because you know nowt will happen. We were ment to have a decision in Jan. Its now Aug. Dont believe everything you read most of it isnt true.
andysimo123 no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old August 9th, 2005, 12:33 PM   #36
Metrolink
Registered User
 
Join Date: Aug 2005
Posts: 6,738
Likes (Received): 0

andy - I don't believe what I read - I believe what people tell me.

There was never going to be an announement about the new lines before the end off the year.

Very early on (about Sept or Oct last year) it was made clear that the priority was to get funding agreed for the upgrade to the existing infrastructure, and that this would happen before the autumn of 2005 - we have that, in early 2005.

The way it has been described to be is that they decided to push very hard for a quick (this is relatively quick in the world of UK light rail) for the upgrade money, whilst continuing the campaign for the 3 new lines for a year (from July 2004).

This year is now up, and they believe they have change the minds of the people in the DfT that need to be on board.

From what I hear, discussions are now starting about the practicallities of getting this done, e.g. the exact funding mechanism, how the system will be ran, how the tenders will be put out, all the very important, but quite honestly dull and labourious. From the discussions I have had, this process is now happening, the very very distant soundings I get are positive (I emphasis distant soundings).

The people I speak to say that this should be at a position by xmas to have a plan that can be made public - even to get to this date the PTE will need to get some 'firm' plans to the government by the middle of Sept.

Things are happening, just because it is not all reported in the media - for good reasons some of the time (much is commercially sensitive info to the bidding companies), be paitent, we have waited 5 years since the initial announement by Prescott, give is another 5 years, I'd expect one line up and running, and work progressing on another.
Metrolink no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old August 9th, 2005, 01:00 PM   #37
andysimo123
wind-up merchant
 
andysimo123's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2004
Posts: 15,963
Likes (Received): 45

The moon is made out of cheese.
andysimo123 no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old August 9th, 2005, 05:28 PM   #38
Metrolink
Registered User
 
Join Date: Aug 2005
Posts: 6,738
Likes (Received): 0

Taken from http://www.theyworkforyou.com/wrans...10153#g12745.r0

Alan Duncan (Rutland & Melton, Con) Hansard source

To ask the Secretary of State for Transport if he will list the light rail schemes which have commenced construction since 1997.

Alistair Darling (Secretary of State, Department for Transport) Hansard source

The following light rail schemes have commenced construction since 1997:

Manchester Metrolink Phase II (to Eccles), 1997.

Tyne and Wear Metro Sunderland extension, 2000.

Nottingham Express Transit , 2000.

Docklands Light Railway extension to London City Airport , 2002.

Docklands Light Railway extension to Woolwich Arsenal, 2005.

Some advanced works have also been undertaken since 1997 for the following proposed schemes: Manchester Metrolink Phase III extensions; Merseytram; Leeds Supertram.
Metrolink no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old August 10th, 2005, 12:12 AM   #39
EarlyBird
BАNNED
 
Join Date: Oct 2004
Location: Central Prezzagrad
Posts: 3,174
Likes (Received): 0

Site of Ashton's main Metrolink stop:



This area used to be home to about 20 families. Their homes were demolished for the tram. The thing had better be built after all this.
EarlyBird no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old August 10th, 2005, 12:31 AM   #40
spacepostman
Fairy Godmother
 
spacepostman's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2002
Location: Manchester
Posts: 542
Likes (Received): 1

There seems to be a great deal of prep work all along the Phase III lines to Ashton and South Manchester. I've noticed signs, and even platforms and ticket machines at Manchester Airport and in Belle Vue, it's like the route amnd the infrastructure is there but there's no line yet.
spacepostman no está en línea   Reply With Quote


Reply

Thread Tools
Rate This Thread
Rate This Thread:

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off



All times are GMT +2. The time now is 01:48 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 1
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
Feedback Buttons provided by Advanced Post Thanks / Like v3.2.5 (Pro) - vBulletin Mods & Addons Copyright © 2014 DragonByte Technologies Ltd.

vBulletin Optimisation provided by vB Optimise (Pro) - vBulletin Mods & Addons Copyright © 2014 DragonByte Technologies Ltd.

SkyscraperCity ☆ In Urbanity We trust ☆ about us | privacy policy | DMCA policy

Hosted by Blacksun, dedicated to this site too!
Forum server management by DaiTengu