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Old April 1st, 2014, 04:48 PM   #1261
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Originally Posted by JohnFlint1985 View Post
lets put it this way - it is one of the few left bad and neglected neighborhoods in Manhattan. Despite the Javitz it is a pretty depressive area in general. With train depots and exit/entrance to Lincoln Tunnel it looks like a forgotten corner. So IMHO any development there, even if it is a complete disappointment to us - lovers of true architecture, will still be an improvement. And by all accounts what is being built there and will be built in the next 30 years or so is on a much grander scale than I was expecting. Parks, public spaces, restaurants, luxury living, Highline park and all its bonanza, high end offices and world renown companies - this neighborhood will see a jump from level 3-4 to level 9 in a 10 point scale of luxury. 10 being the top. So people have nothing to complain about other than their own deficiencies.
Won't that just force more working class people out of Manhattan and price them out into the other boroughs? Not every part of the island should be luxury living. Because luxury living in New York means expensive living.
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Old April 1st, 2014, 05:12 PM   #1262
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Won't that just force more working class people out of Manhattan and price them out into the other boroughs? Not every part of the island should be luxury living. Because luxury living in New York means expensive living.
three things I can say about it.
1. this neighborhood as it is today is not a place where people live. it is mostly industrial. apartment buildings whichever left there look like real slums. so I do hear you and your concerns are valid ones, but you cannot hold the development of the one of the most expensive places on earth due to a very few poor residents in this particular area.

2. keep in mind - that Manhattan's middle name is EXPENSIVE. So if you live there, means you have the balls, the means and desire to live large. Period. I am sorry to say, but I cannot afford this lifestyle so I live in New Jersey in a private house which is very pleasant and relaxing without breaking my back financially. Do I feel any less fortunate or marginalized, due to my clear inability to pay so much for Manhattan place? No, absolutely not. I love my country style living and it is only 10 miles to the city on the car... so all in all - Manhattan is one tough place in terms of spending. whoever cannot afford it - I am sorry, but you've got to move to more affordable places which are around there.

3. every city in the world clearly have more and less expensive places. I doubt some poor people can afford living next to Louvre in Paris or close to Kremlin in Moscow - two of the most expensive cities in Europe. a great majority of people cannot afford that, so they live in less central locations. which is much more OK in US, since it is not like I have to be on Times Square every day or go to work in the city. Plenty of work around. North Jersey have huge amount of companies to choose from. so....
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Old April 1st, 2014, 05:56 PM   #1263
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I understand cities go through economic changes. And I'm not suggesting that progress should be constrained. I just thought it was weird how you implied the best solution to a deprived neighborhood is to simply import rich people.

Especially the line 'people have nothing to complain about other than their own deficiencies'.

It's almost like you view the neighborhood as a kind of commodity. And if it is indeed run down and architecturally stagnant, then we can simply ship all the poors to Queens and get some deserving upper class Manhattanites to live there. Maybe they'll spruce the place up a bit.
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Old April 1st, 2014, 06:43 PM   #1264
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Originally Posted by SomeKindOfBug View Post
I understand cities go through economic changes. And I'm not suggesting that progress should be constrained. I just thought it was weird how you implied the best solution to a deprived neighborhood is to simply import rich people. Especially the line 'people have nothing to complain about other than their own deficiencies'. It's almost like you view the neighborhood as a kind of commodity. And if it is indeed run down and architecturally stagnant, then we can simply ship all the poors to Queens and get some deserving upper class Manhattanites to live there. Maybe they'll spruce the place up a bit.
You heard him right...that's the common refrain these days, it seems.
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Old April 1st, 2014, 08:34 PM   #1265
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There does have to be more of a balance.... New York can help mitigate Manhattan's uber expensiveness by removing a number of regulations and practices... rent control and rent stabilization on a permanent basis in the end is more of an impediment than boon for a vibrant working/ middle class housing market. I love development, but it doesn't mean regular folks should be virtually priced out of Manhattan and be okay with it.

I was reading an article the other day about the fashion designer girlfriend of Mick Jagger who had killed herself, and was in a lot of debt in her business... the crux of the article was that there are many people who work in fields related to the glamour industries in Manhattan who were financially living way over their heads and had to cut back... everything is just dependent on conspicuous consumption and at some time that party has got to end. A little less emphasis on the super rich, some less social engineering and policies that drive up costs in a market that because of location will always have stresses to go higher because of land costs and increasing scarcity of developable land... yep, let the rich have their homes, the income it all generates for the city is essential. Just don't forget the other 99%.... and this is coming from someone who's a centrist, not a de Blasio/ Viverito -Mark lefty.

It's just that New York in its old days was a land of extreme haves and have nots and to virtually eliminate the welcome wagon for the New York working, middle and even upper middle class so we only have in a decade or so the poor and the rich is not a healthy prescription for the city. I'm sure there are many creative policies that wouldn't need to be class war oriented but valuable in helping New York, especially Manhattan, stabilized and economically diverse. I am certainly no great political/ economic mind but I'm just writing because I love the progress happening here and I want as man New Yorkers of all backgrounds to share in this progress.
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Old April 1st, 2014, 08:46 PM   #1266
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well said!
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Old April 2nd, 2014, 10:31 PM   #1267
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Ready to Launch: Jerry Larkin’s Vision for Manhattan West
http://commercialobserver.com/2014/0...anhattan-west/

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Earlier this year, a machine known as The Launcher got to work on the foundation upon which Brookfield Office Properties’ 7.2-million-square-foot mixed-use Manhattan West project will rise.

So far, the metallic-yellow workhorse has methodically placed three of 16 concrete bridge spans atop a set of uncovered Amtrak tracks that lead to Penn Station, the rest of which are expected to be in place by year’s end.

As The Launcher continues to work ahead of schedule at the task, the “neighborhood of the future” is becoming more and more of a reality, as marketing efforts to land an anchor tenant for the development’s first commercial tower intensify.

“People are starting to see that it’s all happening,” Brookfield’s Jerry Larkin, the director of leasing at the firm, told Commercial Observer. “We’re basically talking to every type of tenant out there.”

Over the past several weeks, Mr. Larkin has ramped up his efforts, running dozens of potential tenants through two marketing suites located at Brookfield’s Grace Building at 1114 Avenue of the Americas as well as their downtown headquarters, giving potential tenants a glimpse into the colossal project with 3D models and virtual presentations.

“Firms now are looking to work in a more collaborative environment, so we’re building a very collaboration-friendly building with high ceilings, floor-to-ceiling glass, column-free spacing and all the technological features a tenant in today’s market is looking for,” he said.

The building at 1 Manhattan West, at the corner of Ninth Avenue and 33rd Street, will be a 2-million-plus-square-foot, 67-story building. It will feature column-free floor plates between 33,000 and 38,000 square feet, with “a beautiful, generous lobby with 50-foot soaring ceilings,” glass frontage along Ninth Avenue, and “an opportunity for someone to brand the Hudson Yards district as the first building they will see as they are coming over.”

“We want to make it as easy for our prospects to understand what our dream is, and hopefully we land the big one,” Mr. Larkin said. “I’m not sure who it’s going to be, but it will be a household name for people in New York City and it will be of the first-class nature of the project.”

In addition to 1 Manhattan West, the project will include another office tower of similar size, design and scope, a residential tower, a landscaped two-acre plaza and 200,000 square feet of retail split between the new development and the $200 million redevelopment of 450 West 33rd Street.

A residential building, the first on the new construction agenda, will rise 60 stories, with 800 to 900 units.

A five-star boutique hotel will feature a 9,000-square-foot rooftop garden and signature restaurants.

“We know that our bread and butter is the office space above, so the most important thing is to get the right mix [of retail] that doesn’t take away from the office space and provides all the amenities that tenants need,” Mr. Larkin said.

Plans also are in place to integrate the 1.8-million-square-foot 450 West 33rd Street into the complex, which is expected to be complete before any of the new construction starts in early 2016.

The modernization includes exterior re-cladding, a new lobby, new mechanicals and elevator upgrades to create “an inspiring workspace full of natural light.”
“Today, it is not a very attractive building,” Mr. Larkin admitted. But when the redevelopment is through, he said, “it will be the most modern 100,000-square-foot-plus floor plate building in Manhattan,” noting the dearth of modern floor plates of this size in Manhattan.

The anticipated result, with an additional mix of luxury and “aspirational” retail, restaurants and cafés, is not unlike the concept at Brookfield Place, currently in the limelight as it undergoes its own transformation. It epitomizes just about everything a development firm could ask for in a densely packed Manhattan market, offering tenants, New Yorkers and tourists free waterfront concerts and an upcoming luxury retail lineup.

“We are creating the same type of community feeling with all the amenities, public spaces, communal areas and retail on the scale of Brookfield Place,” Mr. Larkin said. “We’ve had Elton John perform, Bruce Springsteen perform, Bob Dylan, B.B. King, Buddy Guy and many other different types of events, and we’re going to take those uptown to Manhattan West as well to create a sense of community for the tenants and the residents.”

Brookfield Office Properties and other major developers, most notably Related Companies at Hudson Yards, are betting big on the Far West Side. They look to the success of the High Line, proximity to public transportation and the city’s investment in additional infrastructure—like the extension of the 7 subway line and planned changes to the Moynihan Station—as the fodder that will support growth and make the Hudson Yards district. Mr. Larkin anticipates a booming addition to a metropolis now filled mostly with aging buildings.

“It is obviously the neighborhood of the future because of how young the office stock is going to be,” he said. “If you think about Midtown Manhattan, the average age of the office stock is between 50 and 70 years old.

“You couple that with the huge increases of residents moving into the neighborhood and that brings in the retail, the restaurants, the nightlife, the shopping, all to create a dynamic and vibrant neighborhood.”

Mr. Larken has been on board at Brookfield since 1997, and as senior vice president and director of leasing for the firm’s New York and Boston portfolio he said he has overseen some 21 million square feet of office leasing that in part spans Manhattan, with key holdings in all three major submarkets.

The firm’s prominent Midtown holdings include the Grace Building, 245 Park Avenue and 300 Madison Avenue. While Brookfield has most notably made headlines for the work unfolding at Brookfield Place, Mr. Larkin said his entire portfolio’s performance is nearly eclipsing pre-recession levels.

Most recently, Macmillan Publishers took a 176,000-square-foot lease at Brookfield Office Properties’ 1 New York Plaza, as Commercial Observer first reported, following a high-profile Revlon lease at the same building. The College Board moved to Brookfield Place earlier this year.

Last year, Wisdom Tree took nearly 40,000 square feet at 245 Park Avenue, and the international law firm Jones Day took a whopping 330,000 square feet at 4 Brookfield Place and Bane & Co. relocated with a 100,000-square-foot lease at the Grace Building.
“The amount of activity over the last few years has been amazing, especially at the Grace Building,” Mr. Larken said. “We came out of the recession in ’08 and ’09 and our rents have probably doubled since then.”

Midtown South has garnered much attention and, more recently, Downtown Manhattan has experienced an unprecedented comeback and transformation teeming with residential and commercial growth that makes it much more than just a value alternative. But Midtown arguably remains the most sought-after area by global investors and still, by far, the most expensive of the submarkets, with the latest data from Cassidy Turley showing average pricing increasing an additional $0 .75 to $81.63 in March. A well-balanced portfolio stands to benefit.

“In all of our markets we now have tenants competing for space and this is the busiest we’ve been since 2008,” Mr. Larkin said. “We did two million square feet last year and we’re probably going to surpass that this year.”
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Old April 4th, 2014, 02:22 AM   #1268
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its crazy to think of 1,000+ people all living on top of a few thousand square feet.
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Old April 9th, 2014, 12:33 AM   #1269
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Rudin: Brookfield Has A Leg Up
http://www.globest.com/news/12_831/n...tional+News%29
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Old April 10th, 2014, 07:43 PM   #1270
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Developer Taking Heavy Duty Approach to 'Launch' Manhattan West
http://www.ny1.com/content/news/2067...manhattan-west



Quote:
There's not much land left to build on in Manhattan, so developers are getting creative when it comes to building the borough's newest neighborhood, the so-called Far West Side. NY1's Jon Weinstein filed the following report.

A machine known as "The Launcher" was specifically created for Manhattan West. The $7 million Italian-designed apparatus is creating a platform over the existing - and extremely busy - railroad tracks that lead into Penn Station.

"In essence we're building land," said Henry Caso, Brookfield's Vice President of Manhattan West Construction.

The nearly $5 billion Brookfield development is going up between Ninth and Tenth avenues and 31st and 33rd streets. Ultimately on top of the platform will be an open public space with two commercial towers, a residential building and possibly a hotel around it. Along with Related Companies' Hudson Yards project and the 7 train expansion, this will transform a once-barren strip into a hub of activity.

"It's kind of Manhattan's final frontier in a sense. There'll be lots of parks, lots of amenities and the transportation is huge being right next to Penn Station," said Melissa Coley, Brookfield's Vice President of Investor Relations and Communications.

The machine is like ones used to build bridges. It moves massive pieces of concrete into two layers of platforms. Much of the work happens between 2 and 3 a.m. when there are fewer trains running.

"We're using bridge-building technology so we can do two things at once, maintain an operational railroad and create the land so we can build buildings on top of it," Caso said.
Each one of the pieces being moved into place weighs about 56 tons, the equivalent of 25 cars. When the whole span is completed it will weigh the equivalent of 187 buses or 11 blue whales -- 2,400 tons.

Inside two of the platform tunnels are ventilation systems for when the railroads are completely covered below.

"The air comes into this chamber and is exhausted through fans which are equipped inside the structure," Caso said.
After two years of construction, the platform is scheduled to be done by the end of the year.

Brookfield won't start building the office towers until there are anchor tenants, but says they're in negotiations.

There is no specific start date for the residential building, but it's clear that the transformation is well under way.
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Old April 10th, 2014, 08:54 PM   #1271
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I like the heavy duty approach.
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Old April 11th, 2014, 03:47 AM   #1272
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Some decent angles from this photostream: https://www.flickr.com/photos/lost_in_the_library/





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Old April 12th, 2014, 02:16 PM   #1273
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Some recent renders of Brookfield Manhattan West at plaza level:


http://www.manhattanwestnyc.com/


http://www.manhattanwestnyc.com/


http://www.manhattanwestnyc.com/


Interesting Vimeo vid:

(embedding restricted)

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Old April 13th, 2014, 12:40 PM   #1274
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Still somewhat bare for my tastes but every render seems to be better than the last so I'm very optimistic.
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Old April 14th, 2014, 07:22 PM   #1275
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Space Quest: Google Needs More Offices in New York City

Internet Giant Launches Search for Room to Hold More Than 3,000 Workers

http://online.wsj.com/news/articles/...802467100.html

Quote:
Google has played a major role in New York's evolution into a technology center and now wants to expand further in the city, launching a search for enough space to hold more than 3,000 employees, according to several real-estate executives familiar with the hunt.

The Internet firm has been in discussions with several landlords about leasing at much as 600,000 square feet in Manhattan—about half the size of the Chrysler Building. A space that large would represent a roughly 80% expansion for the company, which first established a small outpost in New York in 2000.


The Internet giant's headquarters, at 111 Eighth Ave. in Chelsea. Keith Bedford for The Wall Street Journal

Today, Google is based in the Chelsea neighborhood. The company occupies a total of about 750,000 square feet in two properties—at 111 Eighth Ave., a mammoth building that it bought in 2010 for $1.9 billion, and in Chelsea Market across Ninth Avenue. Google has run out of available space at those locations, the executives familiar with its search said.

The expansion options include 450 West 33rd St., a bulky 16-story building on 10th Avenue that used to house the New York Daily News, and the St. John's Terminal Building, a former freight rail terminal at 550 Washington St. by the West Side Highway in the West Village, people said. The company doesn't appear to be close to making a decision, and it is unlikely all of it would be occupied at once. Many tech companies have started leasing more space than they need in anticipation of growth.

Still, Google's search is the latest sign of how important the tech sector has become to the city's economy and real-estate industry. Tech, advertising and media jobs have grown from 265,700 in 2006 to 327,100 this year, according to brokerage Newmark Grubb Knight Frank.

At the same time, the financial-services industry is losing standing as New York's traditional growth engine. The number of positions dropped to 434,500 from 449,100 in 2006, Newmark said.

Much of the tech growth in Manhattan is from Bay Area tech firms, such as Google, Facebook Inc., Yahoo Inc. and Twitter Inc., which want to recruit software engineers and other who want to live in New York.


One option is the 16-story building at 450 W. 33rd St., on 10th Avenue. Andrew Lamberson for The Wall Street Journal

But behind the more mature tech companies are a "whole wave of startups from five, four, three years ago hitting the second generation doubling and tripling their spaces," said John Wheeler, managing director at real-estate services firm Jones Lang LaSalle Inc.

If Google ultimately leases multiple hundreds of thousands of additional square feet, it would be one of the largest corporate expansions in New York in years. A company typically puts about 500 employees in every 100,000 square feet it leases.

Google's headquarters in Mountain View, Calif., are much bigger than its Chelsea operation. The company reported owning or leasing 7.3 million square feet in the California city as of the end of 2012, the last year it reported specifics.

But New York is the second largest outpost in the country for the company, and company executives have said the demand by its employees to live in the city was far greater than it expected.

Google's building on Eighth Avenue has 2.9 million square feet, but most of the space is occupied by other companies that have long-term leases that were signed with the previous landlord. The company has coaxed some to move; with the others, Google will simply have to wait until their leases expire—in some cases, years.

New York landlords have learned the hard way that the tech sector, like others, has ups and downs. It expanded rapidly during the dot-com boom of the late 1990s, propelling rents and lowering vacancy. When the bottom fell out, vacancy jumped and rents plummeted.

But for now, the growth is boosting many landlords, particularly those with large floors in old buildings that many tech firms prefer because—like trading floors—they promote open communication and collaboration.

The floors at 450 West 33rd St., for instance, are at least 100,000 square feet in size. The building, owned by Brookfield Office Properties Inc., is getting a $200 million face-lift; one change is the replacement of small turret-like windows with large blue glass panels.
Across 10th Avenue, developer Related Cos. is building two giant office towers set near the station of the No. 7 subway line extension that is set to open later this year.

The St. John's Terminal has floors that are larger, more than 200,000 square feet—perhaps the largest floors in Manhattan.
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Old April 14th, 2014, 07:34 PM   #1276
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I saw this article. So they aren't considering leasing new space then? Disappointing.
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Old April 14th, 2014, 08:19 PM   #1277
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Disappointing that not new, but

Quote:
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I saw this article. So they aren't considering leasing new space then? Disappointing.
Disappointing, but nice to see MY favorite brutalist-style truncated pyramid built over a historic RR pit getting some more attention.
Relatively short walk from NY Penn Station (NJ Transit, LIRR), 8th Ave subway or #7 subway extension...

Good views of lotsa RE development for the next few four+ years also.

In the meantime, ILNY/SSP posted this 4/12 photo of the Manhattan West launcher AND east side of 450 W 33rd. today:
http://forum.skyscraperpage.com/show...postcount=1166


ILNY_/flickr

And this clip from video posted on vimeo (posted ~7 months ago by James Ward) shows what we might expect at the Manhattan West site itself this quarter. One example is foundation excavation for the north tower. The video animation is amusing. The view of the snip I took is looking WNW. The 7+ month old video shows excavation/foundation work for the North tower continuing for the rest of this year:

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Old April 14th, 2014, 10:37 PM   #1278
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Originally Posted by Vertical_Gotham View Post
Space Quest: Google Needs More Offices in New York City

Internet Giant Launches Search for Room to Hold More Than 3,000 Workers

http://online.wsj.com/news/articles/...802467100.html
They seem to be looking for real large floors?
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Old April 15th, 2014, 12:15 AM   #1279
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history

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They seem to be looking for real large floors?
Sounds like, according to quote from the WSJ. WSJ is behind a paywall, so all I've read is what is in the quote regarding large floors:

"many tech firms prefer because—like trading floors—they promote open communication and collaboration."

Note that current google NY HQ is the original, way-back, PANYNJ HQ AND the St. Johns terminal was the southern terminus of the NY Central's High Line railroad.
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Old April 15th, 2014, 05:54 AM   #1280
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Google likes large floorplates but they don't like signing expensive leases. They turned their noses up at the Transbay Tower in San Francisco and they lease space in older buildings in NYC. I doubt they would go for anything at BMW without major sweeteners.
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