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Old April 15th, 2008, 11:29 PM   #121
Minato ku
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To be honest for me, the Victoria line was the first full scale automatic railway.
I don't really care of the rest nor who have the idea or the first test. We don't have enouth information about it.

Yardmaster.
"Temple" in London underground and Paris metro.
It is one of most know.
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Old April 15th, 2008, 11:39 PM   #122
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Yardmaster View Post
Some "Station name" Trivia:

Which stations names are duplicated or multiplicated, and which is the most common?
There have been SEVEN separately-sited stations named 'Shepherd's Bush' in the West London area of that name, opened by various railway companies. The most open simulataneously was only three however (1869, Metropolitan / GWR joint x 2 and LSWR) and again this year once the West London Line station opens, although I believe the second it does the Hammermsith & City Line station has the suffix 'Market' added to it.
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Old April 15th, 2008, 11:55 PM   #123
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Tubeman View Post
There have been SEVEN separately-sited stations named 'Shepherd's Bush' in the West London area of that name, opened by various railway companies. The most open simulataneously was only three however (1869, Metropolitan / GWR joint x 2 and LSWR) and again this year once the West London Line station opens, although I believe the second it does the Hammermsith & City Line station has the suffix 'Market' added to it.
I was going to say but surely they don't appear on the Metro Map ? But the 2007 Map in Mark Ovenden's book has two Shepherds Bushes on it ... wouldn't stand here: we have Richmond, West Richmond, North Richmond and East Richmond: but only one of each.

We have internet stuff here that will find your best (fastest, least changes, least walking, or whatever) journey ( using rail, tram or bus, and your feet, if necessary) from your nominated point of origin to your nominated destination ... it does a pretty good job once it understands, after it clears up whether "Footscray" means the railway station, the tram terminus, the shopping centre, the market, the park, the pub, or the football ground: we also have a "Middle" & a "West" Footscray station here: hate to think what the confusion would be if they were all called the same.

Last edited by Yardmaster; April 16th, 2008 at 12:08 AM.
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Old April 16th, 2008, 12:55 AM   #124
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Footscray is also a village on the SE outskirts of London, but it doesn't have its own railway station (neighbouring St Mary Cray does however).
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Old April 16th, 2008, 02:38 AM   #125
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Coccodrillo View Post
Smallest city with a full metro systems: Lausanne.
The longest single line in probably Lille's line 2: 32 km/20 miles.
Moscow grey line (Serpukhovsko-Timirjazevskaja line) - 41.5 km. I am not claiming it is the longest in the world - but here are several lines in Moscow metro longer than 32 km. The page http://metro.molot.ru/line9.shtml claims it is the longest completely underground line.
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Old April 16th, 2008, 07:24 AM   #126
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Yardmaster View Post
Some "Station name" Trivia:

Which stations names are duplicated or multiplicated, and which is the most common?
  • "Richmond" is a name that occurs on the London Met system; also on San Francisco's BART; and on both Sydney's Cityrail & Melbourne's Metrail, however, in the last two instances, the systems apparently don't qualify ... according to criteria I don't yet understand.

  • "Admiralty" ocurs in both Hong Kong & Singapore,
  • "King's Cross" in London & Sydney,
  • "Opera" in Paris & Budapest (although Paris gives the 'e' an acute)
  • "Jamaica" occurs in both NYC & Mexico City.

Here's where it gets interesting.

Many North-American cities are laid out on an almost undisturbed orthoganal grid, and the subway lines simply take the names of the streets where they cross.

In Toronto, for instance, we have:
  • Lawrence & Lawrence West;
  • Eglinton & Eglinton West; and
  • St Clair & St Clair West

Perhaps I am making the wrong inference here, since I don't have a road-map of Toronto ... the same metro line runs through all of these stations, so undoubtedly it would be confusing to have two stations having the same name.

Or would it? Let's go to Chicago.

The lines that run west from Chicago have several stations by the same name (according to the official map I have!); the same applies in the north. Some examples:
  • Central: 2
  • California: 2
  • Clinton: 2
  • Austin: 2
  • Oak Park: 2
  • Chicago:3
  • Cicero:3
  • Pulaski: 3
  • Western: 5 (and two of them on the blue line!)

I guess people are smarter over there; if I asked a taxi driver to take me to Western Metro Station the taxi driver would just say "where?"

New York City has at least two 116th St Stations: there are probably quite a few more duplicates.

There's a "Union Station" in Washington & Boston: it would be interesting to see how many "HautBahnhof"s we could find. Quite a few stations called "City Hall", "Museum", "Central" and "Rathaus": it would be interesting to see which took the brick.
Here are a few more NYC subway stations that share the same name:
23 St (5)
14 St (5)
Canal St (5)
Chambers St (3)
Kings Hwy (3)
Avenue U (3)
28 St (3)
86 St (5) incl two in Brooklyn
96, 103, 116, 145 St (3)
110, 125 St (4)

Almost all the numbered st stations have at last 2 stations on different non-connecting lines with the same name.
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Old April 16th, 2008, 02:50 PM   #127
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Quote:
Originally Posted by anm View Post
Moscow grey line (Serpukhovsko-Timirjazevskaja line) - 41.5 km. I am not claiming it is the longest in the world - but here are several lines in Moscow metro longer than 32 km. The page http://metro.molot.ru/line9.shtml claims it is the longest completely underground line.
The longest single journey could be attributed to London's Central line (54.9km). Does anyone know anything longer? New York's A Train at 50km is the closest I could find..

Another fact...

Highest Rush Hour Frequency: Moscow Metro lines 2, 6, 7 and 9, 38 trains per hour (i.e. one every 95 seconds)

Paris is close behind, and I think some other VAL systems are too, correct me if i'm wrong.
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Old April 16th, 2008, 07:43 PM   #128
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Quote:
Originally Posted by iampuking View Post
The longest single journey could be attributed to London's Central line (54.9km). Does anyone know anything longer? New York's A Train at 50km is the closest I could find..

Another fact...

Highest Rush Hour Frequency: Moscow Metro lines 2, 6, 7 and 9, 38 trains per hour (i.e. one every 95 seconds)

Paris is close behind, and I think some other VAL systems are too, correct me if i'm wrong.
But Central line has parts at ground, and we are discussing longest line completely situated in tunnels

What about longest stage between two stations? Is it 'Strogino' - 'Krylatckoe' in Moscow (6.6 km)?
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Как только проедят напечатанные амерами баблосы, нефтя будет падвацать, хас папиисяд, а толяр - пасто диривянных. И ражко сразу развалиццо. Патаму шо она сичаз разваливаиццо, хотя нефтя ещё не падвацать

Last edited by dars-dm; April 16th, 2008 at 07:48 PM.
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Old April 16th, 2008, 09:04 PM   #129
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Quote:
Originally Posted by dars-dm View Post
But Central line has parts at ground, and we are discussing longest line completely situated in tunnels
Then why did one say

Quote:
I am not claiming it is the longest in the world
And

Quote:
The longest single line in probably Lille's line 2
It was established on the first page what the longest entirely underground line is, it was not established what the longest single journey is.

And Chesham - Chalfont & Latimer on LU's Metropolitan is probably a better example of the longest distance between two stations, considering your example is going to have stations in between it in a few years.
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Old April 17th, 2008, 08:40 AM   #130
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Tubeman View Post
Footscray is also a village on the SE outskirts of London, but it doesn't have its own railway station (neighbouring St Mary Cray does however).
I've been trying to find it: it can't be too big, since the maps I've looked at don't show it. It's where all these "Footscrays" here derived from.
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Old April 17th, 2008, 08:03 PM   #131
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How about the world`s draughtiest, like our English daily here's reporting (as follows)?

Métro misery
Faulty subway doors ( -- station entrances -- ) have crippled at least two healthy, active women

JANET BAGNALL
The Gazette


Wednesday, April 16, 2008


When Marcelline Giroux arrived at Park métro station on Feb. 20, it was 6:45 p.m. Not only had rush hour come and gone, no one was waiting at the 80 bus stop. She decided to take the métro, a decision she would live to regret.

"Usually, I wait until someone else opens the métro door, but that night there was no one, so I went to open it myself," Giroux said in an interview last week. But just at that moment, Giroux thinks someone must have pushed the door open and come through unexpectedly quickly, because she found herself thrown through the open door and onto the floor. She couldn't get up, she couldn't even move.

She would learn later in hospital that the force of her fall broke the collar of her femur. Two young people rushed to help her. A man called 911; a woman rolled up her own coat to provide Giroux, a small, slender woman of 79, with a pillow.

Several weeks later, in a physiotherapy room at Lindsay Rehabilitation Hospital, Giroux met Lily Gregus. The two women had a lot in common: They had both been active, self-reliant and in good health. Plus, there was the métro.

On Feb. 26, at 10:45 a.m., Gregus went through the door to Côte Vertu métro, following a man in his late 50s. Gregus, like Giroux, is a small, slender, older woman. "I noticed that the man was having difficulty getting through the door," said Gregus. "I tried to turn and get out, but just then the wind picked me right up - I couldn't feel anything under my feet - and then it dropped me. I could hear something breaking. I thought it was my hip, but it was my pelvic bone."

In fact, she broke three bones in the fall. Two people came to her aid. A young woman called 911. A métro security guard, who had already called for an ambulance, said to Gregus, "This is not the first time this has happened. It happens often."

Until the ambulance arrived, Gregus lay in the freezing slush, with the cold air from the now open door sweeping over her. "I was shaking from the cold," she said. "The security guard gave me his gloves to keep my hands warm. My own gloves had gone missing."

Montreal's métro was built with a flaw: Its doors. Because the system is completely below ground, the vacuum created when trains travel through the tunnel has an effect on the street-level doors leading into the subway system. Recognizing the problem over the years, the Montreal Transit Corporation has been slowly changing entrance doors for a newer model, called a butterfly door. The new model, in theory, is easier to open even at the moment a train is passing below. The change was prompted, in part, the CBC reported, by a suit filed by Thérèse Morais-Benoît, who broke her hip in 1992 when the wind in Verdun métro station threw her against a concrete bench as she was entering the station. She was 66 at the time. Bizarrely, a judge faulted the transit corporation for putting the bench too close to the métro entrance. She won $28,000.

MTC spokesperson Marianne Rouette said no subway system in the world is immune to the vacuum effect created by trains speeding through underground tunnels. "We are taking steps to diminish it, with the butterfly doors, for example, but diminishing it is all that can be done," she said.

Another measure the MTC is taking is to install blinds to block off cold air currents which add to the vacuum effect."I have been in metro systems in cities around the world," Giroux said, listing London, Paris, Madrid, Moscow, Mexico, Prague and Berlin. "Not one of them has this problem with the doors."

"After I was injured, my daughter asked for a thorough investigation and said the family held the MTC responsible for what happened to me. We've had no response."

Gregus said, "I was a very healthy person and very active. I was caring for my husband who had been ill." She paused to collect herself, adding, "This has changed our lives completely. I have no idea what my prognosis is. I guess my husband would have to go into an institution if I weren't at home."

Giroux, who was booked on a cruise before she fell, is now thinking of selling her home. She cannot do her own shopping or housework any longer. She cannot even bend over to pick something up.

Two lives turn sharply for the worse ... for a design flaw that should have been fixed years ago.

http://www.canada.com/montrealgazett...9d02aee8c7&p=2
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Old April 17th, 2008, 08:19 PM   #132
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Quote:
Another measure the MTC is taking is to install blinds to block off cold air currents which add to the vacuum effect."I have been in metro systems in cities around the world," Giroux said, listing London, Paris, Madrid, Moscow, Mexico, Prague and Berlin. "Not one of them has this problem with the doors."
Thats because London has no doors to it's stations... Neither does Paris I think.
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Old April 18th, 2008, 12:51 AM   #133
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Most metros don't have doors in their underground stations. It's warm enough in there even during harsh winters.
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Old April 18th, 2008, 01:52 AM   #134
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Quote:
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Most metros don't have doors in their underground stations. It's warm enough in there even during harsh winters.
Such naivety! In Singapore the platforms are airconditioned, and closed off from the railway tracks by walls of glass, with doors that only open when the trains are correctly positioned to allow the passengers to proceed directly from the air-conditioned platform to the air-conditioned interior of the train. And when the train doors shut, the platform doors shut as well.
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Old April 18th, 2008, 02:05 PM   #135
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And when the train doors shut, the platform doors shut as well.
Wow, really?
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Old April 18th, 2008, 10:03 PM   #136
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Originally Posted by iampuking View Post
Wow, really?
Yeah really, I couldn't believe it at first, but apparently the doors on the edge of the platform and the trains doors are somehow synchronised... Who'd have thought it?
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Old April 18th, 2008, 11:04 PM   #137
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Yardmaster View Post
Some "Station name" Trivia:

Which stations names are duplicated or multiplicated, and which is the most common?
[LIST]
Here's where it gets interesting.

Many North-American cities are laid out on an almost undisturbed orthoganal grid, and the subway lines simply take the names of the streets where they cross.

In Toronto, for instance, we have:
  • Lawrence & Lawrence West;
  • Eglinton & Eglinton West; and
  • St Clair & St Clair West

Perhaps I am making the wrong inference here, since I don't have a road-map of Toronto ... the same metro line runs through all of these stations, so undoubtedly it would be confusing to have two stations having the same name.
There's also a Lawrence East, but on a different line. Realizing that cardinal appendages can only go so far new stations will start taking on names of local neighbourhoods or attractions where possible/duplication may occur. The University line in Toronto stops at all the same streets as the Yonge line 3 blocks east, so alternate names were assigned with the actual cross street indicated beneath the station name at each stop.
  • Wellesley and Museum - not quite on the same street (named for the Royal Ontario Museum [and the McLaughlin Planetarium at the time of opening. The Gardiner Ceramics Museum can be substituted now])
  • College and Queens Park (named for Provincial Legislature)
  • Dundas and St. Patrick (named for the old neighbourhood ward, plus St. Patrick's Church two blocks west is probably the origin of the name)
  • Queen and Osgoode (named for the law school/courts), with the opening of the new opera centre, one could argue it be renamed Opera)
  • King and St. Andrew (again named for the old neighbourhood ward, taking it's name from the Presyterian church one block west of the station)

Hyphenating a name so as to indicate an intersection is another option. The duplicated Yonge station on the Sheppard line was named Sheppard-Yonge. There was an option to name the entire station Princess Royale after the late Diana. The historic neighbourhood name of Lansing would have solved all the problems.

Quote:
There's a "Union Station" in Washington & Boston: it would be interesting to see how many "HautBahnhof"s we could find. Quite a few stations called "City Hall", "Museum", "Central" and "Rathaus": it would be interesting to see which took the brick.
Union and Museum can also be found in Toronto, both on the same line.
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Old April 19th, 2008, 02:09 AM   #138
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Quote:
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I can dispute both, even if the first is a bit dubious

The Tower Subway opened in 1870. It was a proper 'Tube' railway (the first) and inspired the City & South London Railway, but it was a single car on a single track hauled by cable so it could be debated whether it really counts.

Regarding conversion from steam to electric: the District Line between Earl's Court and High Street Kensington was experimentally electrified in May 1900 and a single electric unit plodded up and down, and as it has been electrified for passengers ever since I'd assert it counts. This prototype 4-rail system was later rolled out more widely, with the first full stretch being Acton Town (then Mill Hill Park) to Park Royal three years later on 23.06.03... what date did the Mersey railway get electrified?
Tubeman,

The electrified Mersey Railway was opened for traffic on 3rd May 1903 so we did just beat the Londoners but I take your point about the experimental electrification.

Although the Tower Subway was narrow gauge and cable hauled, I suppose it does count as a tube railway (lined with cast iron segments too, one of the features associated with tube tunnels) so I will concede that point reluctantly.
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Old April 19th, 2008, 03:48 AM   #139
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Quote:
Originally Posted by iampuking View Post
The longest single journey could be attributed to London's Central line (54.9km). Does anyone know anything longer? New York's A Train at 50km is the closest I could find..

Another fact...

Highest Rush Hour Frequency: Moscow Metro lines 2, 6, 7 and 9, 38 trains per hour (i.e. one every 95 seconds)

Paris is close behind, and I think some other VAL systems are too, correct me if i'm wrong.
minimal average (or say planned) interval - 89 seconds.
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Old April 19th, 2008, 04:07 AM   #140
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Which city sees most riders annually?
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