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Old July 3rd, 2016, 01:37 AM   #2141
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City Suites.

Pep Guardiola has got the 17th floor Penthouse.







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Old July 3rd, 2016, 01:46 AM   #2142
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Exchange Court(44 stories), Renaker, Post Brexit.

Manchester is still open for Business.



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Old July 3rd, 2016, 01:51 AM   #2143
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No1 Spinningfields.

The overhang currently supported by temporary rusty steel supports.





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Old July 3rd, 2016, 02:08 AM   #2144
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The Royal Exchange Refurbishment.











http://www.the-royal-exchange.co.uk/
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Old July 3rd, 2016, 10:10 AM   #2145
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Absolutely incredible photo update jrb
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Old July 3rd, 2016, 11:08 AM   #2146
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34-44 Jersey St | Ancoats
Apartments | City Zone

Thread: http://www.skyscrapercity.com/showth...#post127335480

  • Address: 34-44 Jersey Street, Ancoats, City Zone Manchester M4

  • Architect: Callison RTKL

  • Floors: 7-8

  • Number of apartments: 158

  • Developer: Manchester Life

Current status: Groundworks

Nearest transport: New Islington










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Old July 4th, 2016, 01:03 AM   #2147
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London Road Fire Station Tour.

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Old July 4th, 2016, 07:58 PM   #2148
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A draft copy of Greater Manchester’s transport strategy to 2040 has been released today, outlining the long-term plan for all aspects of travel in the city region, from local neighbourhoods to the access of global markets via Manchester Airport.

The strategy covers a series of priorities to be addressed in the city region over the next 25 years. These include a mix of projects which have already been committed to, as well as schemes listed as ‘ongoing’ within the strategy period, which will be subject to feasibility studies.

The transport strategy until 2040 has been released for a 12-week consultation period. Alongside, TfGM is also consulting on the delivery plan for the next five years. This includes:
  • Business case development for road improvements around Port Salford and Manchester Airport

  • Further development of Airport-Piccadilly HS2 route

  • New link from A57 at Mottram Moor to A57 at Woolley Bridge

  • Masterplans for improvements at National Hub stations

  • A Piccadilly Hub masterplan

  • A review of bus routing and interchanges

  • Increasing Metrolink capacity from Manchester to Salford Quays

  • Feasibility studies into tunnels under Manchester city centre to support rapid transit schemes, and orbital links

  • Potential strategic park and ride

  • Development of a Greater Manchester Highways Strategy Delivery Plan

  • Integrated fares and ticketing system, and work with Transport for the North to develop cross-modal payment system across the North
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Old July 4th, 2016, 08:19 PM   #2149
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Hotel operator secured for part of the 55 storey tower.

Click on the link below the render for the full article and more renders.

Allied London/Mike Ingall, St John's.



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Allied London secures hotel for St John’s tower

4 Jul 2016, 11:33

Allied London has released a series of new images showing the latest designs for the St John’s neighbourhood, and has confirmed that Nadler Hotels will operate a 110-bedroom hotel from the tallest tower within the scheme.

- See more at: https://www.placenorthwest.co.uk/new....TqvuaduR.dpuf
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Old July 4th, 2016, 09:04 PM   #2150
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Property Week.

Quote:
Salford’s MediaCityUK is primed for the next stage in its evolution

1 July 2016 | By Mia Hunt

MediaCityUK has been hailed as a shining light for the north, and it may soon shine brighter.


£1bn has been earmarked for phase two

The next stage in its evolution, a £1bn investment in phase two, is due to be brought forward after plans were submitted to Salford City Council last month.

The ‘reserved matters’ application - which will deal with the parts of the site not settled when the original outline planning permission was granted in 2006 - will encompass nine plots comprising 540,000 sq ft of offices, 1,800 apartments, retail and leisure provision, public spaces and a pedestrian promenade.

Now that MediaCity has established itself, what part will the plans play in its evolution?

The brainchild of Peel Land and Property, MediaCityUK revitalised the former Manchester Docks and played a significant role in the regeneration of Salford and Greater Manchester. When it opened in 2011, it brought 1.5m sq ft of commercial, residential, hotel and retail and leisure space to what had been an unloved and underutilised suburb.

Success story

Some doubted MediaCityUK would secure the calibre of tenants Peel aimed to attract; doubts soon quashed when a number of BBC departments relocated from London to Manchester. That landmark deal led to the flood of businesses and young talent that have taken up residence at the scheme since, cementing its reputation as a world-leading tech, media and creative hub.


An ‘experimental’ studio and office space

While MediaCityUK’s success is well documented, Warwick Smither, a partner at Manchester-based property consultancy Cheetham & Mortimer - which is retained as the sole letting agent for the scheme’s retail and leisure elements - says it came as a surprise to many.

“Some individuals within the BBC were not particularly enamoured with the thought of moving ‘up north’, and in particular to what they perceived was a relatively poor area of Manchester,” he says. “The reality is a bright, shining example of regeneration.”

The scheme - now a 50/50 joint venture between Peel and Legal & General Capital - is continuing to evolve even before phase two takes shape, with three new buildings coming on stream. The 100,000 sq ft ‘experimental’ office and studio scheme, Tomorrow, is due for practical completion in July, while The Lightbox - which will deliver 238 apartments in a 19-storey tower overlooking the waterfront and Manchester’s skyline - is anticipated to launch in the first quarter of 2019. A new restaurant for The Alchemist is also in for planning.

Picking up momentum

“There is momentum in progress,” says Stephen Wild, managing director at MediaCityUK. “Peel built a high-profile destination and five years on it is hugely important that we set the framework to build on its success.”

The site’s former incarnation, Manchester Docks, was a thriving commercial hub employing 3,000 people before it spiralled into decline and closed in the early 1980s.

Peel’s vision from the very beginning was that the scheme should contribute to the wealth of Manchester and the wider area. It has succeeded in its goal. MediaCityUK’s total economic impact was £277m gross value added (GVA) in 2014-15 alone.

“When Peel invested £650m in the construction of MediaCityUK between 2007 and the end of 2010, there was an absolute determination for the economic benefits to be felt by local people,” explains Paul Newman, director of communications at MediaCityUK and Peel Media.

During the construction of phase one, Salford companies won contracts worth £93m and Greater Manchester businesses benefited to the tune of £230m.

[b]Steady growth[b/]

“There has been steady growth and there are now a total of 7,000 people living, working and studying at MediaCityUK,” says Newman. “The projections set out in the first masterplan in 2006 were that the site would eventually host 15,000 people - that was the original ambition and this year plans have been put in place to achieve that.”


MediaCityUK is host to incubator space and more

The site currently plays host to 250 businesses and educational institutions including ITV, the University of Salford and a swathe of small and innovative tech companies. All are catered for, from incubator space in the famous Greenhouse to destination offices for the big players.

Wild says the operating costs, access to talent from strong local universities and the housing stock all contribute to occupiers’ desire for space.

“They feel they are better off located in a place where the operating costs are cheaper, where there are resources, where they can retain talent and where they can be part of a cluster of like-minded businesses,” says Wild.

“As the needs of our occupiers change, we’ll grow with them; that approach is important,” he adds.

According to Wild, Manchester has received international acknowledgement. He believes MediaCityUK is well positioned to maximise the global opportunity but that that opportunity will be further unlocked by the so-called ‘northern powerhouse’ and greater infrastructure and power capacity in the north.

If phase two is given the go-ahead - the plans are expected to be considered by the council in September - the hope is for construction to start on the first residential development in early 2017, with the rest delivered thereafter in what Wild describes as a “seamless process”.

“We have the right mix here to drive it forward and there is a self-fulfilling economic benefit,” he says. “We’ve outlined what we want to deliver in the next 10 years and we have a vision far beyond that.”

The creation of a successful media and tech hub at MediaCityUK has already had a huge impact on Greater Manchester and the wider region. The question now is whether phase two can build on its shining reputation and exploit the global opportunities that are coming its way.
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Old July 4th, 2016, 09:22 PM   #2151
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They got the location of Kampus wrong. I'll let them off for that glaring error.

Property Week.

Quote:
Manchester's property recovery: 20 years after the bomb

1 July 2016 | By Helen Crane

Ask any Mancunian where they were on the day the Provisional IRA detonated a truck bomb in the heart of the city on 15 June 1996, and they will no doubt have a story to tell.


Bomb blast, Corporation Street, Manchester

Scene of devastation: 200 people were injured and buildings decimated by the bomb blast on Corporation Street - Source: Lynne Sladky/AP/Press Association Images

Although no one was killed, 200 people were injured in what was the biggest bomb blast in Great Britain since World War II. Having targeted Manchester’s infrastructure and economy, the IRA succeeded in its goal; what suffered most was the city’s main commercial and retail district, where 500,000 sq ft of shops and offices were destroyed, causing an estimated £700m worth of damage.

Contrast that with the Manchester city centre of today, where destruction has given way to construction and developers are clamouring to put up office, residential and retail schemes. The main concern for the property industry now is that there is still not sufficient supply to meet the exceptional levels of occupier demand.

What has happened over the past 20 years has been nothing short of a transformation - one that can in part be attributed to the events of that Saturday morning.

“Some people think the success of the city is entirely down to the IRA bomb, which in my view is completely wrong,” says Ken Bishop, development director at JLL in Manchester, who was working as head of office agency at DTZ in 1996. “But it placed us in a very fortuitous position and took down a very ugly and unloved part of the city centre.”

Growth spurt

When the bomb went off, development in the city was just getting started again after the 1989 recession. “In 1996, the economic prospects for Manchester and the UK were getting pretty strong,” says Bishop.

Thanks to the buoyant market, Manchester’s property industry was having a growth spurt. Savills had opened its Manchester office - its first outside London - just two months before the event.


Kampus is in the north of Manchester

“Manchester City Council called all the property companies to the town hall to see what we could do and how we could relocate businesses and tenants,” recalls Peter Mallinder, who still works at Savills as an investment director.

“It was quite exciting as it gave us something to get our teeth into straight away.”

Around 600 businesses were affected. Eight buildings were under construction at the time of the bombing, four of which were delayed by minor damage.

Two of these were Amec Developments’ (now known as Muse Developments) 100 and 101 Barbirolli Square; neighbouring buildings just outside the traditional city core, which between them cover 220,000 sq ft. They were completed in 1997, and Bishop says the unavailability of city centre space helped expand office occupiers’ horizons to slightly more far-flung locations.

Now, Manchester’s next wave of high-profile office schemes - including Ask Real Estate’s 101 Embankment and Muse’s One New Bailey - are on the very fringes of the city centre.


New Bailey

“Barbirolli freed the shackles for developers,” Bishop says. “Following that, Allied London did Spinningfields and Argent did Piccadilly Place. I couldn’t have seen those schemes happening without Barbirolli.”

Adam Higgins, co-founder of developer Capital & Centric, which has just submitted plans for the £200m mixed-use Kampus scheme north of the city centre, agrees. “The area north of where the bomb went off became dead pretty quickly,” he says. “But that area was suddenly opened up and is now home to the Printworks.”

Manchester-based developers have led the development charge in the past 20 years, with Allied London topping the table having delivered 1.72m sq ft across nine buildings. Ask and Muse are in the top four, having delivered 600,000 sq ft and 467,000 sq ft respectively. And London-based Argent comes in second, having developed 850,000 sq ft across four buildings since 1996, although it is now planning to pull out of the city amid doubts about the level of returns it can achieve in the regions.

Some believe that the spread of the central zone could be taken further still. “Masterplanning needs to take place beyond the inner ring road to create sustainable neighbourhoods that link in with the whole,” says Allied London’s development director Graham Skinner.

Leisure and placemaking

Most in the industry agree that the transformation of leisure and retail spaces and the public realm was what really changed the face of the city and made it a more attractive place in which to live, work and visit.

Manchester City Council’s director of housing Paul Beardmore says placemaking has been high on the city’s agenda for the past 20 years. “Sir Howard Bernstein and Richard Leese have an ethos that we need to create somewhere that people will choose to be,” he says. “The starting block is always ‘what is the purpose of this place, and what do we want to achieve here?’”

One of the worst-hit buildings, and one of the key elements of the redevelopment masterplan that followed, was the Arndale shopping centre, then owned by P&O.


The Arndale Centre: key to Manchester’s post-bombing redevelopment

David Moore, head of the North West region at Lambert Smith Hampton but previously a founder at Tushingham Moore, recalls a large plastic football that had hung over the entrance to the JD Sports unit being blown off and landing at the opposite end of the shopping centre.

Despite the damage - which meant that retailers had to close temporarily - Moore says the subsequent redesign and recladding was a long time coming.

“The Arndale certainly needed work doing on it internally,” he says. “There were plans afoot to develop that area [before the bomb], but those plans were accelerated and we eventually ended up with a bigger scheme.”

It also cleared the way for Selfridges to be brought into the city, on a site adjacent to the Arndale, now called Manchester Arndale.

It previously housed a 1970s precinct-style urban square, which David George, partner and head of the Manchester office of Falconer Chester Hall Architects, described as “very poorly designed”.

“The whole development was quite uninviting and acted as a barrier disconnecting the city centre from the historic cathedral area and Victoria station,” he says.



JLL’s Bishop says the city’s “unlovely” Renaissance Hotel, on which Urban & Civic is now delivering a 248-bed apartment scheme and a new hotel, is one of the last vestiges of the old city centre and was “symptomatic of that area “.

Few historic buildings were badly damaged, but Katie Tonkinson, head of the Manchester office of architect Hawkins\Brown (who hails from Manchester but was away at college during 1996), remembers the medieval Shambles pub being deconstructed, ready to be moved elsewhere.

“I do recall coming back to the city; little bits of it were particularly unrecognisable,” she says.

Tonkinson says work to make the city centre more attractive is ongoing. “We’re trying to accommodate more smaller units and fewer big-box retail aspects, making it a more walkable city,” she says, adding that, with more people coming into the city centre to live, a “high-street feel” is preferable to large, imposing schemes.

Social pull

The effect of these significant changes was to draw more people into the city centre to live. “Before the bomb, there were very few places you could go and eat or drink in the city centre,” says Savills’ Mallinder. “You were in Manchester to work and you’d go back to the suburbs to socialise.”

Mallinder also thinks the more lively city centre has encouraged graduates to remain, which in turn has strengthened the region’s economy.

In the 1980s, the number of people registered to vote in general elections in the city centre ward averaged around 70, but now that figure is closer to 20,000.

“A phenomenal amount of housing has been delivered after the bomb,” says Beardmore, adding that there is now little land left for new schemes without redeveloping commercial premises, leading to a preponderance of tall towers.

The masterplan produced after the bomb included Crosby Homes’ luxury 14-storey tower No 1 Deansgate, which has broken several residential records in the city, including being the home of the city’s first property worth £2m in 2002.

The ringmaster

The thread holding all these aspects together is the council, which Bishop says acted as the “ringmaster” after the events of 15 June. It set up development corporation Manchester Millennium to oversee the regeneration, and Alison Nimmo, now chief executive of The Crown Estate, was appointed as project director.

To this day, developers credit the dynamic duo of Bernstein and Leese with bringing investment into the city in the days following the bomb. “All of the masterplanning we do now almost stems from what we learned then,” he says.

“The one thing that differentiates Manchester from other local authorities is that we don’t do things ourselves in terms of development,” he adds. “Engagement with the private sector is absolutely key; we couldn’t have rebuilt the city centre without it.”


The new No. 1 Spinningfields

Agents say occupiers were not particularly scared off by the bomb, perhaps because, thankfully, no lives were lost. Nonetheless, Capital & Centric’s Higgins says the council went all out to get businesses back into the city, by speeding up the planning process, for example.

It was also a crash course in handling the large-scale regeneration schemes that are now commonplace in the city.

“Even though areas such as what is now Spinningfields were largely unaffected by the bomb, it enabled that to happen because it meant the council could handle difficult regeneration projects,” Higgins says.

Allied London’s Skinner attests to this. “Spinningfields was not easy to develop as it was benchmarked against the best in class nationally, and to some extent globally, with constant challenges made of designers, consultants and the delivery teams,” he says. “However, the partnership with the city council was a true partnership whereby help and assistance was made available.”

Debates will endure about just how much of a turning point 15 June 1996 was in the fortunes of Manchester. But given how far ahead the city is in terms of investment compared with its regional counterparts, it is clear it did not hamper the city’s progress. “It reflected the stoicism of the people,” Tonkinson concludes. “That’s what Manchester’s all about.”
Please note. Victoria Station has now been redeveloped.





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Old July 4th, 2016, 09:37 PM   #2152
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The highrises should have gardens and enough parking space.
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Old July 4th, 2016, 11:59 PM   #2153
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Click on the links for more information and renders.

Quote:
Allied London unveils plans for 'urban oasis' in Spinningfields

15:28, 4 Jul 2016

By Shelina Begum

The Field at Hardman Square will be 'a celebration of green space' in the city and will include new bars and restaurants interlinked with footpaths and planted areas



https://twitter.com/AlliedLondon?ref...Ctwgr%5Eauthor

http://www.manchestereveningnews.co....arebar_twitter
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Old July 5th, 2016, 12:05 AM   #2154
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Renaker twitter.

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Old July 5th, 2016, 01:01 AM   #2155
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X1 Media City | Michigan Avenue | Salford Quays | 4 x 86m | 4 x 26 fl | App


A close up shot of the site from a high vantage point, you can see clear progress on tower 2, with what appears to be a hole for where the core will go:



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Old July 5th, 2016, 10:42 AM   #2156
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Owen St | Great Jackson St | 200.5/158/140/122m | 64/50/44/37 fl | Pro


Taken by me from Cloud 23, the 23rd floor in the 50 storey Beetham Tower:

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Old July 5th, 2016, 03:05 PM   #2157
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Victoria Station looks incredible, especially indoors.
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Old July 5th, 2016, 05:03 PM   #2158
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Quote:
Originally Posted by iamtheSTIG View Post
Owen St | Great Jackson St | 200.5/158/140/122m | 64/50/44/37 fl | Pro


Taken by me from Cloud 23, the 23rd floor in the 50 storey Beetham Tower:

I am confused. This supposed to be approved now?
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Old July 5th, 2016, 06:48 PM   #2159
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Yes. All of Owen St is now approved (as of last Thursday), with Towers 1 & 4 at groundworks. The digger you see in Stig's photo is digging away at the foundation for Tower 1.
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Old July 5th, 2016, 07:01 PM   #2160
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Apologies if these actual renders have already been posted in this size? There's that much happening in Manchester atm, and the threads are so fast moving, it's hard to keep up with what has been posted and what hasn't.

St John's tower. 55 stories.

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