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Old July 22nd, 2014, 02:08 AM   #2561
geogregor
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If we are on subject of the Mississippi crossings here are bridges from Natchez in Mississippi to Vidalia in Louisiana (US Hwy84)

Driving into Louisiana




Looking from Louisiana bank of Mississippi.




And few local highways, I don't remember on which side of the river I took those shots, most likely in Mississippi






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Old July 22nd, 2014, 02:47 PM   #2562
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Do we even have such cantilevered truss bridges for road traffic in Europe? Perhaps in the former Soviet Union.
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Old July 27th, 2014, 09:19 PM   #2563
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Woodward Avenue (M-1) in Detroit:
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Old July 28th, 2014, 08:04 PM   #2564
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US 27 and friends, Fort Benning, GA

Georgia really doesn't do expressways, but US 27-US 280-GA 520 has evolved into an exception. It's been four lanes for a long time, I guess since the fifties or maybe since the WW2 era, but over the decades it's been upgraded, interchanges added, and access points revised and/or removed. From the general appearance, I'm guessing this work was done by the Corps of Engineers rather than GDOT. I find it interesting-- maybe you will, too.

This is I-185 southbound approaching Fort Benning. I-185 was six laned down to St Mary's road a while back, in the '90's, IIRC. The section from there to Fort Benning is more recent, since 2010, and involved straightening out a 50 mph/80 kph S curve. The pavement was removed and replaced with all-concrete lanes and shoulders, even where the road wasn't realigned.

As you see, there's a lane drop exit for US 280-GA 520 westbound-- there's a recently-added flyover ramp for the opposite direction, too. It looks weird on a map, but that's definitely the heaviest turning movement through the interchange. Too bad that there's no arterial (or any road at all!) cutting off that rather extreme corner:


At the I-185-US 27-US 280-GA 520 interchange, a grand gateway to Fort Benning has been built. It looks pretty spectacular, actually. Directly in front of the bridge, FORT BENNING GEORGIA is incised into the buff-colored precast. Leaving the base (I worked there in 2011 and 2012), it's COLUMBUS GEORGIA. Embarassingly, the Streetview here is far better than my crappy photo.



A bit farther southeast on US 27 et al, there's this unusual interchange. The northwestbound ramps are elevated to squeeze them in between the mainline lanes and the nearby Cusseta Road (the old highway, I presume) and railroad. I think that GDOT would've done a pair of panelized retaining walls instead.

Within Fort Benning, there's a median guardrail broken only at access points. Just beyond this interchange, there's a break for an emergency vehicle turnaround, and as we drove through, an ambulance made a U turn there for no obvious reason.



Further down, a new overpass, and older one, and a closed-off at-grade access point. Since I'm dumber than a box of rocks, it didn't occur to me that the new bridge is on a separate road for tanks and other heavy vehicles even though I noticed that the pier is solid like the ones for railroad bridges instead of being a two-column bent per GDOT practice. As you can see on the satellite view, the at-grade access point has been replaced by a trumpet interchange, though the at-grade facility has been barricaded off rather than removed. Perhaps it'll come in handy for some reason.







A little further southeast, there's this pedestrian bridge. I wouldn't be surprised if they use golf carts to get around the base-- that would explain why the bridge and its approaches are step free. There's another bridge like this over Lindsay Creek Parkway (the unnumbered late '70's extension of I-185).


Finally, well off the base on the other side of Cusseta, there's a permanent speed warning sign. Between its unusualness and the fact that it informed me that I was doing 64 in a 55 zone, I got so flustered that I not only didn't get a photo, but also failed to make the right turn (at the intersection at the bottom of the hill) to stay on US 27 and had to make a U turn. Fortunately, there was an unusually prominent reassurance (or not!) sign for US 280-GA 520, so I noticed my mistake promptly. My family will be coming that way in the near future-- the feature that confused me can serve as a landmark for them.
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Old July 28th, 2014, 09:54 PM   #2565
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CA-14 Antelope Valley Freeway

Remarkable
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Old July 29th, 2014, 02:27 PM   #2566
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Murica can into metric system
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Old July 29th, 2014, 05:20 PM   #2567
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New aerials of the new Stillwater Bridge project over the Saint Croix River
























All courtesy of WisDOT
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Old July 29th, 2014, 05:48 PM   #2568
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If I read correctly, there are only two such bridges in the United States;

* St. Croix River Crossing (U/C) in Wisconsin/Minnesota
* Pearl Harbor Memorial Bridge (2012 / 2016) in Connecticut

We're talking about extradosed bridges here. They look like cable-stayed bridges, but they are in fact box girder bridges with cable stays to allow a longer span with low towers.

Extradosed bridges are fairly cost-efficient. They can bridge longer spans than your typical box girder bridge or beam bridge, but don't need the large towers of a cable-stayed bridge. They are also aesthetically pleasing compared to the boring box girder bridges.
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Old July 29th, 2014, 05:58 PM   #2569
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ChrisZwolle View Post
If I read correctly, there are only two such bridges in the United States;

* St. Croix River Crossing (U/C) in Wisconsin/Minnesota
* Pearl Harbor Memorial Bridge (2012 / 2016) in Connecticut
There are two more that recently opened in Texas. The Extradosed design itself is still exceedingly rare, even globally.
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Old July 29th, 2014, 10:24 PM   #2570
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ChrisZwolle View Post
Remarkable
These types of dual-unit mileage signs were quite common on I-5 through the central valley up until the turn of the century. Unfortunately, most, if not all, of these signs were replaced with the metric units left off.

I seemed to recall seeing a couple of dual-unit signs on US 101 between San Francisco and Los Angeles too.
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Old July 31st, 2014, 05:51 AM   #2571
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Quote:
Originally Posted by myosh_tino View Post
These types of dual-unit mileage signs were quite common on I-5 through the central valley up until the turn of the century. Unfortunately, most, if not all, of these signs were replaced with the metric units left off.

I seemed to recall seeing a couple of dual-unit signs on US 101 between San Francisco and Los Angeles too.
Just drove down last weekend and I saw a few. I think maybe 2 on I-5 and I think I've come across 2 in the Bay Area. The entire Caltrans standards and all their projects were in metric, but they reverted in the last few years because they were the only ones, which complicated things.
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Old August 1st, 2014, 10:43 AM   #2572
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SR 520


A view of the SR 520 project on a sunny day with Seattle in the background
by WSDOT, on Flickr


The Evergreen Point Road lidded overpass
by WSDOT, on Flickr


Bellevue Way Northeast
by WSDOT, on Flickr


108th Avenue Northeast
by WSDOT, on Flickr


92nd Avenue Northeast lidded overpass and transit stop
by WSDOT, on Flickr


The 84th Avenue Northeast roundabout
by WSDOT, on Flickr
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Old August 3rd, 2014, 10:24 PM   #2573
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The Port of Miami Tunnel opened to traffic this morning

http://miami.cbslocal.com/2014/08/03...-finally-open/

It is a twin-tube undersea tunnel that allows direct access to the Port of Miami via I-395, instead of via the downtown street grid. Construction took nearly 5 years. It is a PPP project, but is toll-free for users.

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Old August 4th, 2014, 07:43 AM   #2574
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Tennessee Route 8 / Market Street Bridge in Chattanooga


Market Street Bridge (1 of 2) - Chattanooga, TN
by t55z, on Flickr
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Old August 6th, 2014, 12:22 PM   #2575
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016
by Nexis4Jersey09, on Flickr
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Old August 8th, 2014, 01:25 AM   #2576
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Houston, Outbound Morning Traffic & Construction

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Old August 8th, 2014, 07:44 PM   #2577
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Loop 101, Phoenix, AZ

Loop 101 project scheduled to begin this weekend

A major project that will add new lanes in both directions of Loop 101 between Shea Boulevard and Loop 202 (Red Mountain Freeway) in the Scottsdale and Salt River Pima-Maricopa Indian Community area is scheduled to begin this weekend (August 9-10).

The $72.7 million project will widen 11 miles of Loop 101 south of Shea Boulevard with the addition of one new lane in each direction. A second new northbound Loop 101 lane also will be constructed between the Loop 202 interchange and McDowell Road.

The improvement project is scheduled for completion by late 2016.

Full press release: http://www.azdot.gov/media/blog/post...n-this-weekend

This will widen Loop 101 to 10 lanes. Only a small portion of the project area is in built-up area, most of it is just east of Scottsdale urban limits.
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Old August 8th, 2014, 09:43 PM   #2578
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US 85, North Dakota

US 85 open to 4-lane traffic between Watford City and Alexander

The North Dakota Department of Transportation (NDDOT) opened the first segment of 4-lane highway on US 85 today. This 14-mile segment located west of Watford City to just south of Alexander marks the completion of the first phase of the US 85 project.

Press release: http://www.dot.nd.gov/dotnet2/news/d...-4laneopen.pdf

It is part of a project to twin US 85 in western North Dakota, as it provides the main access to Williston and the oil-rich Bakken Formation from the south. Traffic volumes are rising, and so are fatal accidents. A lot of large equipment needs to be moved along the road.
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Old August 17th, 2014, 07:43 PM   #2579
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US 319, TALLAHASSEE to TIFTON

US 319, TALLAHASSEE to TIFTON

Part 1: Tallahassee to Thomasville


I've long been fascinated by this route because it arguably demonstrates four different ways of addressing the same problem: providing a four-lane corridor on a route that isn't especially heavily traveled, but is desirable for system continuity reasons. Really, the narrative needs to go from north to south, but I took the photos headed northbound, so that's how I'll present them here.

I'll start with the impressive flyover carrying southbound 319 traffic onto Capital Circle-- the route through downtown is now FL 61. As you see from the satellite view, the nearby interchange with iI-10 is cobbled together and counterintuitively arranged, despite the recent addition of a braided ramp onto I-10 westbound from Capital Circle.





North of here, 319 is a state-of-the art (at the time) six lane arterial per Florida practice, with bike lanes and no opportunity to turn left onto the road from side streets except at intersections that are designed to be signalized eventually. The whole eastern half of Capital Circle is built per the same concept, but over a long enough period of time that it's easy to see how Florida's thinking has evolved. The older northeastern quadrant of Capital Circle has little inbuilt provision for control of left turns, but the brand-new southeastern quadrant has increasingly elaborate provisions including buttonhook left turn ramps (admittedly ROW is less constricted there), plus brick paver-looking crosswalks and ever more elaborate landscaping. US 319 is more in an intermediate phase. Sadly, I didn't get any photos-- it would be hard to show what I'm talking about from a windshield photo, anyway.


The urban configuration of 319 (and, arguably, Tallahasse itself) ends abruptly at Bradfordville, site of a Target shopping center; there's a Walmart center not far south of there, and a high school to the north. I guess we'll see how that works out-- I can't imagine that Target, Walmart and the local board of education didn't anticipate their customer base sprawling for miles in every direction when they built there. That said, you'll see that upgrading the highway to a more urban standard will be easy when the time comes.

Here's where the fun really begins, at the rural section. This was the last of the four segment of 319 to be widened (Tallahassee-Thomasville-Moultrie-Tifton), and Florida really pulled out the stops. The median is wide and variable, and there are buttonhook left turn ramps at (to me) more than convenient intervals.









Annoyingly, I breezed right into Georgia without getting a photo of this section's most interesting feature: these football-shaped intersections. Unsignalized crossings of rural divided highways often present a comprehension problem to stupid or impaired drivers, but the unusual shape of these crossings surely suggests that there's something atypical going on here-- turning left from the crossing into oncoming traffic would require a counterintuitively sharp turn. The layout looks 18 wheeler-friendly, too.

Last thing: There are fairly elaborate filter berms to protect water quality. The granite riprap used in my neck of the woods is surely hard to come by here; instead, they use broken concrete, stained by dirt to an attractive light beige. It looks surprisingly nice.

All in all, this is the best rural divided highway I've ever seen.


Now, on to Georgia. From the state line to the outskirts of Thomasville is like Florida's section, just not as high powered. Again, the median is wide and variable-- this part was built before Georgia adopted its current practice of adhering strictly to the 44 foot median and roadways that are exact clones of each other.







Thomasville has bypasses for US 19 on the east, US 84 on the north, and US 319 on the west, plus Pine Tree Blvd to the south, but none are controlled or limited access, so I always take the shorter diagonal through downtown. Just hope not to get caught by a train-- there are bridges over the railroad, but no obvious way to get to them. GPS does come in handy at times.

[size=x-small]Once I got caught by a train-- it moved incredibly slowly for a long time, then stopped and started backing up! I took off to the west, and to my family's horror, drove our (white) minivan through the adjacent railyard, across the tracks on a black-muddy path, and made it to the overpass at MLK, which we could see in the distance. [/size]

Thomasville was a resort in the Victorian era-- vacationers would get to Savannah by ship, then take the railroad until it ended. It has many Victorian homes and other buildings, and the downtown, once forlorn looking, looks nicer every time I see it. Driving through that Saturday, there were plenty of people there, though not enough to cause a traffic problem.

Here are two photos of the US 19 Thomasville Bypass looking from 319, first northward...


...then southward. This stretch of US 19, built in the early '60's, is Thomasville's main suburban commercial strip, and has now-mature trees planted in a neat row down the median.
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Old August 17th, 2014, 07:49 PM   #2580
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Part 2, Thomasville to Tifton

While I tend to think of the Tallahassee-Tifton highway as demonstrating four different ways to address the same situation, that's not really fair. From the southern outskirts of Thomasville southward is mostly pine woods, but northward of there is impressively agricultural. That means that it makes more sense to use a more conservative cross section to avoid disrupting farms and farmhouses. So...

North of Thomasville toward Moultrie, there's this: an unvarying five lanes, even right through Coolidge, the only town on that segment. Yawn. This was the third segment of the route to be completed, and presumably incorporates lessons learned from the Moultrie-Tifton segment.



This is the southern end of the Moultrie bypass. IIRC, it was built in the late '70's or early '80's as two lanes, with the second roadway added in the '90's. Here you see the oversized left turn bays that Georgia is so fond of. In places it has frontage roads, like you'd see in Alabama. It also has a Home Depot and a Lowe's almost next door to each other. To my amazement, both are still open, and when we drove through, they were both doing brisk business-- each of their parking lots were about 2/3 full. At this point I'll add that Moultrie and the other agricultural towns here look quite prosperous.

I wish that at least the GA 33 north to GA 133 portion of the Moultrie bypass had been built as a freeway, especially since work has been started to widen 133 from I-75 at Valdosta to Albany. But that's just roadgeek OCD in action.



Between Moultrie and Tifton is the first and most interesting of the four segments to be built. The rural sections were built as four lanes with a narrow painted median, more like continuous passing lanes than a real four lane highway. Now, though, left turn bays are being built at every intersection.






Entering the town of Norman Park, new sidewalks have just been added, with colored, stamped concrete like you'd see in the suburbs. It looks like the contractor skimped on the dye, though-- the color is more hot pink than brick red.



Through Norman Park and Omega, the cross section narrows to three lanes including a two-way left turn lane. Going by memory, I would've said that the three lane sections are provided with sidewalks, but they aren't everywhere.



This is in Omega, FWIW.



North of Omega, reconstruction isn't quite so far along. I say "reconstruction" because in some places where that turn lane is being added, the profile is also being flattened out, requiring removal and replacement of both pavement and subgrade. In these areas, portable jersey barriers separate the work-in-progress and detour areas, so the difference in profile is easy to see (how did I not get a photo of that? ). That seems rather extravagant, especially considering that the area is so flat. However, some of the existing pavement is in really horrible shape: not potholed, but rough like a washboard, and for no obvious reason. I assume that they'll be terminating the problem with extreme prejudice.
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Last edited by Tom 958; August 21st, 2014 at 04:01 AM. Reason: typos
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