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Old September 26th, 2009, 04:28 AM   #501
J N Winkler
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It is normal thickness for a local road. For higher-type pavements it is basically a difference in projected service life--Americans tend to prefer 20-25 years for roads where widening is anticipated.
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Old September 26th, 2009, 01:14 PM   #502
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nice pics the usa is nice place for a roadtrip
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Old September 26th, 2009, 03:23 PM   #503
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The Begin of NJ Hwy 21 @ The Newark Airport Highway Interchange

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City of Newark Skyline from Hwy 21 Northeast Corridor Bridge
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Hwy 21 north @ Emmet Street in Newark,NJ
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Hwy 21 @ Walnut Street
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Entering Downtown Newark on Hwy 21
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Hwy 21 crossing Market Street & Amtrak Newark Penn Station
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Hwy 21 near Center street & The New Jersey Performing Arts Center
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Hwy 21 @ Bridge Street
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Hwy 21 @ I-280 Interchange
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Hwy 21 in Northern section of Newark
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Hwy 21 @ Clay Street
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Hwy 21 in North Newark @ Exit 5
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Hwy 21 crossing over Route 7 in Belleville ,NJ
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Hwy 21 North in Belleville
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Hwy 21 near the Route 3 Interchange in Nutley ,NJ
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Hwy 21 in the Route 3 Interchange in the City of Clifton
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Hwy 21 in Passaic ,NJ
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Hwy 21 @ Exit 13
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Last 700 feet of Hwy 21 , US 46 Merge ahead
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crossing crooks avenue in Clifton & The begin of hwy 20
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Hwy 20 at I-80 Interchange
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Hwy 20 in the City of Paterson
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Hwy 20 @ Route 4 in Paterson,NJ
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Hwy 20 @ Fair Lawn ave
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Crossing the Passaic River
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The End for now, hope you enjoyed

~Corey
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Old September 26th, 2009, 05:19 PM   #504
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Nice bridge on that last pic
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Old September 26th, 2009, 11:03 PM   #505
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I bet US has many such beautiful scenic places like the last picture.
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Old September 26th, 2009, 11:49 PM   #506
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It is a nice bridge but it needs a paint job.

Here is US 202 in Central-South Jersey
The "Welcome to New Jersey Sign"
in Lambertville,NJ


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US 202 north near Ringoes,NJ
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US 202 North in Three Bridges,NJ
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Rural Scenes
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US 202 North in Centerville,NJ
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US 202 in Readington,NJ
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Thats it for now , i will post more after my trip tommorrow

~Corey
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Old September 28th, 2009, 12:46 AM   #507
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Nice scenery and good pavement. I thought the name Three Bridges was interesting, so I searched for it and accidentally stumbled upon the world's largest model railroad there.
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Old September 29th, 2009, 05:07 AM   #508
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Originally Posted by Nexis View Post
Crossing the Passaic River
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This bridge might look nice, but it is terrible. There is really only room for one direction, but both ways are forced onto it. Not only that, at one end, there is a light, so you have to sit on the bridge waiting for the light to turn green. It is in desperate need of a replacement, sort of like the Morlot ave. bridge further downriver, but this case is worse.
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Old September 29th, 2009, 05:23 AM   #509
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Verso :Heres the link , if you don't already know it > http://www.northlandz.com/
US 9W south of the NY Thruway has some very nice houses along it.
we start in South Nyack,NY


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The US 9W South over a Viaduct in Piermont,NY
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Oak Tree Road West in Palisades,NY
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crossing over the Palisades Parkway
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NY 340 South
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Rockleigh : Bergen County : New Jersey
Piermont Road South

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a few moments later on County Road 502 West in Closter ,NJ
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[COLOR="rgb(255, 140, 0)"]County Road 502 & 505 : High Street & Knickerbocker Road in Closter[/COLOR]
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County Road 502 @ Schraalenburgh Road
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County Road 505 : Old Hook Road crossing the Oradell Reservoir or my Drinking supply
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in Emerson,NJ
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in Westwood,NJ
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Rockland Coaches Inc. its a semi large bus company in North Jersey / Rockland County ,NY
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County Road 502 West @ County 503 : Old Hook Road @ Kinderkamack Road
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County Road 502 bears left across the Train tracks , Broadway continues Straight and Westwood ave is too the right.
The Pascack Valley Line are the tracks there, a train appears every 30 mins during Rush hour and every hr off peak , the run between Spring Valley,NY to Hoboken Terminal in Hoboken,NJ.

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i hope you liked , more too come
~Corey
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Old September 29th, 2009, 09:46 AM   #510
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Nice homes, Rockland County is a nice place to live, city nearby, but also large natural areas (Catskills etc.)
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Old September 29th, 2009, 10:32 PM   #511
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Great houses, really. They cause urban sprawl, but what the heck. It's becoming popular here too, although I still prefer living in city. What's the town Three Bridges called after, btw? Are there 3 bridges in the town? Are they one by another or on different places?
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Old October 5th, 2009, 06:56 PM   #512
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Thats not the Catskills, its The Palisades.
There are 3 Bridges on US 202 , 2 over a creek and one over a freight line. The town three bridges does have 3 bridges in it.

Today i show trip from yesterday through 2 state parks in Western Jersey.


Exiting I-80 in the Delaware Water Gap
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This section of Old mine Road is one lane and controlled by traffic Lights
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The 2 lane section is slightly wider, it reminds me of a Japanese road.
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Entering Delaware Water Gap National Recreational Area
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Millage Sign of Major Campsites and small villages
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Upper Glen Camp site
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Millbrook,New Jersey a small village in the part , they were having a festival yesterday.
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Millbrook-Flatbrook Road North
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Wallpack-Flatbrook Road North
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Sussex County Road 560 East
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US 206 North
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Approaching the Delaware Bridge to Pennsylvania
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Milford–Montague Toll Bridge US 206 North
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Looking North
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1.40$ Toll
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End of US 206 ,@ US 209 in Milford, Pennsylvania
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US 209 North
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US 6 North
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Thats the end for now i'll the rest tomorrow, i hope you liked

~Corey
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Old October 5th, 2009, 07:11 PM   #513
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Once again, great photos! Keep 'em coming.

Did you also take pics on I-80?
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Old October 6th, 2009, 09:46 PM   #514
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Alexriga View Post
I bet US has many such beautiful scenic places like the last picture.
The vast majority of Virginia's land area is similar, and i expect that much of the East Coast would be as well.
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Old October 6th, 2009, 11:34 PM   #515
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It is probably the Piedmont region with sloping hills and deciduous forests. That is the lower foothills before the Appalachians and above the coast. At Philadelphia the Piedmont comes very close to the coast.
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Old October 7th, 2009, 07:43 AM   #516
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NJ 23 South in Montague ,NJ

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Millage Sign on NJ 23 South

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Climbing up hill

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At the top

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Going Down hill
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NJ 23 in Sussex,NJ
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Dutch-American Bakerky
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near Hamburg,NJ
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Main street area of Hamburg
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JCT with NJ 94 <---- Warwick,NY : -------> Columbia,NJ

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Franklin,NJ

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Climbing up hill

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NJ 23 Freeway South Passaic / Morris Counties

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NJ 23 South in Riverdale / Butler,NJ

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I-287 Interchange

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Ramp to I-287 Northbound

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I hope you liked , more to come soon

~Corey
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Old October 7th, 2009, 12:19 PM   #517
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I like those American suburban and smalltown homes. Here in the Netherlands, every house looks the same, little variation in shapes within one street.
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Old October 7th, 2009, 08:57 PM   #518
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Oh, look, this post has a title!

There's a vast difference between suburban houses, urban houses, and rural houses.

Urban houses are often built from vastly different time periods, in vastly different styles, making a big hodgepodge of a wide range of time periods, as the areas often got developed over an extended period - on my street, developments began in appx. 1900 and went up until the 1930s or so. Street layouts are typically logical, with grid-layouts. Most houses have a wide porch to sit out on a nice day.

Suburban houses are often built in subdivisions, which each are composed of houses built all at once, or in just a few years, with a single entrance or exit to the subdivision, and insane, illogical street layouts, with a very few entrances or exits into the outside world. Very often the developer puts up a fancy sign outside, naming the subdivision after what was there before the houses were built: for example, "Apple Orchard Acres," where the apples are long gone, or "Hunting Hills," where, now that it has been developed, it is very dangerous, and quite likely fruitless, to try to go hunting. Houses are very often very similar in styling, and quite often they're identical houses with slight variations. I don't like this way of building cities.

Rural houses are built from vastly different time periods, ranging from brand-new, to quite ancient, so styles are vastly variable - one house I know of was built in the 1600s (it's about to be renovated) and of course there's occasionally a new one built. They typically are on a wide area of land, possibly on a farm. Driveways are long, and the house is often set far back from the road. Large detached sheds and garages are likely present. Rural residents are quite wealthy more often than they are in urban areas. If the resident has money to spare, they are more likely to have a wide lawn, and often more land that isn't wooded; rednecks' properties are more likely to be wooded.

Just my two cents on ChrisZwolle's comment about how American housing isn't composed of cookie-cutter houses... (It sometimes is, which is what a lot of suburban housing is)
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Old October 8th, 2009, 05:21 AM   #519
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Quote:
Originally Posted by nerdly_dood View Post
Urban houses are often built from vastly different time periods, in vastly different styles, making a big hodgepodge of a wide range of time periods, as the areas often got developed over an extended period - on my street, developments began in appx. 1900 and went up until the 1930s or so. Street layouts are typically logical, with grid-layouts. Most houses have a wide porch to sit out on a nice day.
This type of house construction is called "Craftsman-style bungalow" and was quite popular before World War II. Verandahs were routinely provided because, in the days before residential air-conditioning was widespread (mid-1960's), this was the only part of the house which was relatively cool.

Quote:
Suburban houses are often built in subdivisions, which each are composed of houses built all at once, or in just a few years, with a single entrance or exit to the subdivision, and insane, illogical street layouts, with a very few entrances or exits into the outside world. Very often the developer puts up a fancy sign outside, naming the subdivision after what was there before the houses were built: for example, "Apple Orchard Acres," where the apples are long gone, or "Hunting Hills," where, now that it has been developed, it is very dangerous, and quite likely fruitless, to try to go hunting. Houses are very often very similar in styling, and quite often they're identical houses with slight variations. I don't like this way of building cities.
A few observations:

Roads inside modern, post-World War II subdivisions tend to be built to a curved pattern (without deliberately seeking to be tortuous or maze-like) to discourage cut-through traffic and high speeds. In newer subdivisions there is also a tendency to have roads terminate on tees, since drivers tend to ignore the priority-to-the-right rule and accord priority to vehicles coming along the top of the tee. Few enough drivers understand priority to the right that it is not defensive driving to approach uncontrolled crossroads at speed while looking just to the right.

Developers have a financial incentive to avoid excessive twistiness in subdivision roads because it is to their financial advantage to space the internal roadways two lot depths apart, with a minimal number of odd-shaped lots which are difficult to sell and are typically the last to be bought and built upon. Too many curves typically lead to too many odd-sized lots. You do tend to encounter more twistiness and more odd-shaped lots in subdivisions which, while not necessarily gated with control of entry and exit, are positioned as exclusive. Such subdivisions often have amenity features like a golf course or an artificial lake and also required minimum house square footages which are designed to keep out low-income residents. The developer trades off the added cost of the amenity features and odd-sized lots for higher profit margins on the prime lots.

Reducing economic uncertainty is the name of the homeownership game in postwar subdivisions. The main focus of interest is the resale price of the house. This is why many subdivisions (the actual rules vary from subdivision to subdivision and are enforced by covenants which, in many cases, provide for a homeowner's association to administer what amounts to planning control) tolerate very little variation not just in floor plan but also in exterior finishes. If you have invested in a house with brick facing, why would you want your neighbor to be able to put up a cheap-looking shack with vinyl siding which then promptly pulls down the value of your own property?

Planning control through covenants is often taken to extremes in subdivisions which have a high transiency factor or a low year-round occupancy rate, e.g. Del Webb housing developments in Arizona snowbird country. In some developments in Sun City, Arizona, for example, you are not allowed to paint any interior or exterior walls anything but beige (sometimes ironically called "Del Webb white") lest unusual paint colors result in your house becoming difficult to sell, and thus pulling down the resale value of your neighbors' houses. Areas with loose zoning (e.g., Houston) tend to have very restrictive covenants also.

Where architecture is concerned, what is called the "ranch style" dominates in postwar subdivisions all across the US. It is essentially a type of bungalow, usually with the longer side facing the street, and fairly large lawns (in comparison, Craftsman houses tend to have square or oblong floor plans with the short sides facing the street and relatively small yards). Covered porches are usually provided in front, but are vestigial because they are not relied on as places to sit in hot weather--nearly all houses constructed in four-season (or warmer) climates in the last forty years have had central air-conditioning. It makes a great deal of difference what improvements the homeowner chooses to undertake. Trees in the back yard will provide shade within 20 years. Ranch houses tend to be built with postage-stamp back patios of poured concrete, but it is not uncommon to take this out and replace it with either a wooden deck or a screened porch.

The walking distance from essential services like supermarkets and banking/posting facilities is actually not very large in cities which stick to the principle of zoning light commercial development at the intersections of section-line roads (a typical subdivision in the part of the US covered by the PLSS will cover the grid square defined by consecutive north-south and east-west section-line roads).

Porosity does make a difference--the "traditional" postwar subdivision (the kind built from about the mid-1950's to about the mid-1980's) will typically have multiple accesses to the surrounding section-line roads, and these are fairly attractive for walkers. The more recent type of "exclusive" subdivision with aggressively consolidated access (sometimes down to just one or two entrances per mile on a given section-line road) greatly increases the walking distance (at least in psychological terms, and sometimes also in terms of possible pathways which are both legal and physically practical to traverse) from an individual house to the outside world, unless specific provision is made for pedestrian access, e.g. by providing walking trails or golf-cart paths to the supermarkets.

Postwar subdivisions have developed and continue to develop at widely varying speeds. The subdivision I grew up opened for housing construction around 1955, and was substantially built-out only in 1985. But this is in a Midwestern city where the real estate market is characterized by slow but steady growth both in housing development and land values. In other areas, where the housing market is much more tightly constrained, more cyclical, and more susceptible to speculative excess, it is possible for entire subdivisions to be built within fewer than ten years, often with supermarkets and other communal facilities coming much later.

It is a bit of a cliché to say that postwar American housing subdivisions are bland, uniform, and soulless crucibles of anomie. That description certainly fits many of them, and the emphasis on reducing economic uncertainty (for both buyers and sellers) does tend to promote architectural uniformity, but there is actually considerable diversity both in traffic circulation and in availability of community amenities. Herbert Gans' The Levittowners is a very useful analysis of how communities form and operate within a traditional postwar subdivision--gated communities are a more recent (and IMO much more objectionable) development.
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Old October 8th, 2009, 11:22 AM   #520
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Quote:
Originally Posted by J N Winkler View Post
In newer subdivisions there is also a tendency to have roads terminate on tees, since drivers tend to ignore the priority-to-the-right rule and accord priority to vehicles coming along the top of the tee. Few enough drivers understand priority to the right that it is not defensive driving to approach uncontrolled crossroads at speed while looking just to the right.
Don't these intersections typically have 4-way stop signs or are otherwise signed in a way that if there's no yield or stop sign, it practically always means you have the right of way?
Off the top of my head, I can't think of any uncontrolled, unsigned intersections where you had to use 'priorite a droit'. Maybe it also varies by state.
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