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Old June 4th, 2008, 04:01 PM   #81
bdaly
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Originally Posted by RochesterAddict View Post
This is a new restaurant opening up in the old Burger King on West Ridge road. Pretty interesting a 17 year old is opening it. Watch the video, it sure doesnt look like a Burger King anymore: http://democratandchronicle.com/apps...22/-1/ARCHIVES
It'll be interesting to see how they do. It looks like a nice place, although that strip has struggled a bit with Kodak's restructuring. With things stabilizing a bit over there, hopefully people will be in a mood to go out and eat and grab coffee again. I'll have to give it a try. Another coffee shop opened up on Merchants Street and Wyand. They've done a ton of work to that building and there's more planned. He's also planning on adding a lunch menu. With it being a walk from my house, I'm hoping they'll have success.
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Old June 4th, 2008, 07:34 PM   #82
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The Powers building reflecting into the Crossroads building.

'The Daily Record' moving in Rochester
Democrat and Chronicle

A century-old legal and real estate publication is about to move to one of downtown Rochester's prime locations.

The Daily Record plans to relocate to 3,400 square feet on the ground floor of the Powers Building at Main and State streets by late June, said Publisher Kevin M. Momot.

"The visibility is going to be a huge difference from where we are now," Momot said.

Currently The Daily Record operates out of 11 Centre Park in the city's Cascade District off West Main Street. Rochester real estate development company Buckingham Properties bought the building in 2007 from owner Jack Hay. Hay also had been owner of The Daily Record until selling it in 1998 to Minneapolis-based Dolan Media Co., which specializes in publications and business services for the legal, financial and real estate industries.

The paper, which publishes five days a week and has a daily circulation of about 1,000, is primarily read by the local legal and real estate community. Each issue is filled with listings of federal tax liens, real estate transactions, legal notices, court dockets and local court rulings of note.

Moving a few blocks east to a main crossroads of downtown will put The Daily Record a bit closer to its readership, Momot said.

"A lot of them are right here at the Four Corners."

The Daily Record spent the past 30 years in the Cascade District building. When it started 100 years ago, it was in the Powers Building. So it is returning to its original location, a building named for banker Daniel W. Powers, whose Powers Banking House first appeared at Main and State shortly after the Civil War.

The move comes as The Daily Record is going through a sizable revamping, including a redesign of its newspaper product with full color.

The publication is moving into what had been an M&T Bank branch. Renovations of the space began in March, Momot said, and included removal of teller stations and a large bank vault.

Another local Dolan Media operation, its Rochester office of Counsel Press, also is relocating from the Cascade District building.

The Counsel Press operation, which prints appellate court filings and decisions, will be next door to The Daily Record in what had been a card and gift store.

The Daily Record employs 10 and plans to add three positions in the next few months, while Counsel Press employs three, Momot said.

Both The Daily Record and Counsel Press are leaving Centre Park as their leases are expiring. The Daily Record quit printing its paper in house in 2007 and no longer needs the 12,000 square feet it has in the Cascade District. The printing now is done by Adnet Printing of Canandaigua.

Including The Daily Record and Counsel Press, the Powers Building will be about 90 percent occupied, said Mark D. Stevens, president of the Ashley Group, which owns the building.



DEVELOPMENT: Correcting a riverfront albatross
City Magazine

The Genesee Commons has always looked foreboding. The nearly solid wall of 70's-era low-income apartments on Mt. Hope Avenue contrasts sharply with the Victorian-era mansions to the south. And there's almost no indication from the street that it's riverfront property on the Genesee Riverway Trail. When the property was purchased by Conifer Realty a few years ago, it was known to residents and business owners as a crime-ridden eyesore.
About a third of the property, which consists of 202 units in the tower to the north and 100 in the five adjoining lower buildingsto the south, is vacant today.

Conifer is planning to invest more than $30 million into the complex, now called River Park Commons. The investment will make the project one of the city's most significant new housing developments.

But the preliminary designs, while a vast improvement over what is there now, are not what many nearby residents say the area needs. The South Wedge Planning Committee has received a grant to renovate Mt. Hope Avenue, and some residents see the redevelopment of both Mt. Hope and River Park Commons as a one-time opportunity to join the riverfront and the apartments with the neighborhood.

"We know how important this site is to everyone," says Allen Handelman, Conifer's project director. "Ever since it was built, people have been trying to figure out ways to correct what is there."

The plans call for leaving the tower intact, but renovating all of its units with updated kitchens and baths. The building is mostly occupied, but tenants would need to move to different units for a short time while their units are remodeled.

The five lower buildings would be demolished, and 12 new structures would be built in their places, with a total of 100 two-bedroom units. Each building would have three floors and a brick and wood-style exterior. Green space and walkways are planned between the buildings so there is visual and physical access to the river and trail.

Parking is limited for the size of the complex. Tenants with multiple cars would likely have to use street parking. That's just one of several things irking Robert Boyd, executive director of the South Wedge Planning Committee.

"If someone is paying $1,200 a month, they're going to have cars," he says. "If it's a professional couple, they will have more than one. So that means you will need side-street parking in the neighborhood."

The design of the new buildings is not impressive, Boyd says. There is access to the river, but no sidewalks leading directly to it. And there is no aesthetictransition, he says, from the tall 70's-style concrete tower to the new buildings.

"It just stops and the new construction starts up again," he says.

The design doesn't reflect the area, Boyd says.

"All the buildings look the same," he says. "They look more like apartments you would find in Henrietta, not a historical neighborhood like South Wedge."

Boyd has created a video explaining all of these concerns to residents, with instructions on how to contact the city's building and zoning department. He has learned from past experiences with the city and developers, he says, how to build alliances to encourage design changes. His most recent battle was over the Highland Hospital parking garage plans, which were eventually modified to include some of Boyd's recommendations.

Addressing those concerns, however, would not be easy or inexpensive for Conifer. River Park has some physical constraints. The new buildings would be constructed on the existing foundations because digging would disturb the site, and require cleanup of whatever containments are unearthed. It's unknown if any problems exist, but it is a constant concern for developers and the city, particularly along the river.

"There was a lot of fill used on the site, and we don't know exactly what that contains," says Dorraine Laudisi, a senior planner with the city. "Using the existing foundations is kind of a given."

And the city has a 30-foot sewer easement running through the middle of the parking lot. The new buildings can't be arranged differently on the parcel to increase the view of the water because of the foundations and the sewer line.

Increasing the parking may not be an option, either. Conifer needs all of the proposed units, particularly the higher-end units, says Handelman, because much of the project'sfunding is coming from government sources. The city, for instance, is contributing more than $3 million. Some of that government funding is contingent upon building an 80/20 ratio of market-rate housing to income-based housing. Increasing parking would reduce space available for units.

Excess parking is not typical, Laudisi says. The property is close to downtown, she says, and on a major bus line.

Another big concern is the 30-or-so tenants still scattered throughout the five buildings. Conifer will give the tenants the option to stay, but out of the proposed 100 new units, only 20 are planned as affordable housing. It's possible, says Handelman, that tenants will be displaced.

"We have a displacement plan in place to help people relocate nearby, if that's the case," Handelman says.

But even if all of the other issues are addressed, there is still the question of why such an important riverfront site is being used for affordable housing at all. Most cities have been using their waterfront sites for luxury housing - development that invigorates downtowns and rebuilds tax bases.

Boyd says that the inclusive mix is what makes the South Wedge work.

Comment on River Park plans
The city is accepting public comments on the River Park plans, which can be found at the South Wedge Planning Committee's website: www.southwedge.org


National play center company considers Greece, East Rochester
Democrat and Chronicle

A company that has 170 play centers around the country is looking at two locations in the Rochester area for its newest franchise. Pump It Up officials say they have their eyes on East Rochester and Greece for their inflatable-filled playlands.

The two suburbs have the right demographics and logistics for Pump It Up arenas: "a certain level of income, lots of young kids," said Gordon Keil, CEO of Pump It Up. He spoke by phone from company headquarters in the Chicago area.

Keil said Pump It Up frequently chooses sites in light industry parks because of the availability of appropriately sized buildings — 6,000 to 10,000 square feet in area with 20-foot ceilings.

The larger arenas include six inflatable structures, Keil said, and a climbing wall. The company debuts new features every six months, he said.

"We're fairly well saturated on the West Coast, throughout California," Keil said, and so the company has started moving into the Northeast. Its only other franchises in New York are on Long Island.

Keil said Pump It Up hadn't talked with real estate brokers yet about specific properties but had done market research in the area. The marketing data revealed that the Rochester area also would be a good place to find prospective franchise owners, he said.

"The number one way we find owners is people who have attended parties at Pump it Ups," Keil said.

East Rochester's light industrial park already features a baseball-themed indoor recreation center, a skateboard and roller skating arena and a gymnastics training center, all of which offer birthday parties.

The more the merrier, suggested Debra Ross, operator of the Kids Out and About's Web site, which lists activities for families with children, including indoor arenas and birthday party locations.

"There is no question that here in Rochester, the market is ripe for just these kinds of venues," Ross said. "As wonderful as our children's museums are and as enticing as Chuck E Cheese is for kids, families crave variety. And competition begets innovation, so everyone benefits."

Keil said uncomfortable weather is a boon to Pump It Up locations.

"In the snow belt, you can feel safe and secure that when you plan a birthday party at Pump It Up, it doesn't matter if it rains, it doesn't matter if it snows, it doesn't matter if it's cold," Keil said.


Bella Carta Studio plans open house
Rochester Business Journal

Bella Carta Studio LLC, a Rochester business that designs hand-crafted invitations and announcements, has moved to a new location.
The design firm has relocated from its Monroe Avenue location to 11 North Goodman, Suite 15.
“We’re thrilled to be opening our new space in this historic mansion-turned professional office in the Neighborhood of the Arts,” said Lisa Frey, Bella Carta’s president and principal designer. “In just three years of business, we’ve grown to be a nationally recognized design studio specializing in distinctive invitations. It’s such an exciting time for us and we are proud to announce our new location to the Rochester public.”
The public is invited to an open house 5:30 to 8 p.m. Thursday.

Last edited by RochesterAddict; June 4th, 2008 at 10:16 PM.
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Old June 5th, 2008, 05:06 PM   #83
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Plans Released for Genesee Hospital Site
WHAM 13

Plans are taking shape on the site of the former Genesee Hospital.

“We're going to do a combination of housing, offices, and maybe small retail with a very strong bias toward neighborhood orientation,” said developer Larry Glazer.

Glazer’s company, Buckingham Properties, is spending $83 million to make it happen.

The garage has been shored up, and renovations are under way to an existing office building where Preferred Care will soon move. Construction on a branch of Canandaigua National Bank will begin soon.

The major piece will be a new medical office complex right on the corner of Monroe Avenue and Alexander Street.

“We have seen the market studies and demographic analysis that there is potentially a very good opportunity to repopulate this with medical services for this end of the city,” Glazer said. “And don't forget, you've got 50,000 people who also work downtown every day.”

The north side of the campus will be a mix of housing, offices, and retail. That will be the final component, and architectural drawings have not been drawn up yet.

“It looks like it will be rental, perhaps for sale units. It will not be what I consider very high end,” Glazer said.

The project, called Alexander Park, is expected to take four years.



New Greek restaurant on Monroe Ave, Astoria: http://www.rochestercitynewspaper.co...ND%3A+Astoria/



Paetec, state and city to spend millions on move
Rochester Business Journal

Paetec Holding Corp. plans to spend $100 million to $150 million to build its new headquarters at the Midtown Plaza site, officials said Thursday. The demolition of Midtown and city support for business relocation will cost an additional $68.5 million.
Meanwhile, Paetec chairman and CEO Arunas Chesonis said Providence, R.I.-based Gilbane Inc. has been selected as project developer. Founded in 1873, Gilbane is among the nation’s oldest builders.
Fourth-generation members of the Gilbane family today lead the company, which has annual revenues topping $2.5 billion and more than 25 offices nationwide.
Most of the funding for the demolition will come from the Empire State Development Corp., which is contributing $55 million for asbestos abatement and demolition.
The city of Rochester will invest $12.67 million, including $5.9 million to purchase the property, $5.5 million to help Midtown businesses relocate, $900,000 to manage, operate and maintain Midtown properties, and $300,000 for professional services and consulting, officials said.
The city closed on the purchase of the Midtown site May 28.
Midtown businesses are scheduled to leave the complex by July 31, when the plaza will close to the public. The underground parking garage will close Sept. 30.
The demolition is scheduled to begin in June 2009 and be completed by October 2009. Construction of Paetec headquarters is slated to begin in September 2010.
Paetec, a Perinton-based telecommunications firm, plans to build a 50,000-square-foot structure on the property and move some 600 employees downtown. The company expects to add 400 workers.
In addition to housing Paetec, the Midtown property will also include “mixed use urban space,” officials said.
Information on the development will be available online at www.MidtownRochesterRising.com.


The site above has some nice pictures:

The footprint of the Midtown complex.



Downtown Rochester



The doors to City Hall.

Last edited by RochesterAddict; June 5th, 2008 at 11:09 PM.
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Old June 6th, 2008, 05:16 PM   #84
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Smithsonian museum builder hired for Rochester's PAETEC tower
Democrat and Chronicle

A Rhode Island construction company known for a Smithsonian museum will oversee development of PAETEC Holding Corp.'s new headquarters skyscraper at the site of Midtown Plaza.

PAETEC Chief Executive Arunas Chesonis announced the hiring of Gilbane Inc. of Providence, R.I., to manage construction of the tower, which might rise as high as 37 stories. Xerox Square, currently the city's tallest building, is 30 stories.

City and state officials gathered with Chesonis for Thursday's announcement at City Hall and unveiled a Web site — MidtownRochesterRising.com — that will track the 8.5-acre redevelopment project.

The PAETEC building, estimated to cost between $150 million and $200 million, will occupy part of the site. Its height and cost could vary because PAETEC is getting requests for additional floors from high-end office users and condominium developers, Chesonis said.

He said PAETEC chose Gilbane because the 135-year-old New England company was open to working with Rochester-area contractors and architects. Gilbane has $2.5 billion in annual revenue and managed construction of the Smithsonian's National Air and Space Museum in Washington, D.C.

Among those joining the telecommunications company's CEO were Gov. David Paterson and Mayor Robert Duffy. The state is providing $55 million to demolish Midtown Plaza and the city almost $13 million for the project.



Group seeks more tourists
Democrat and Chronicle

VisitRochester, the local tourism agency, will send a delegation to Toronto next week to try to attract Canadians to the region this summer.

The event at the Toronto Hilton on Tuesday will include a lunch for Canadian travel industry members and media co-hosted by VisitRochester and the New York state Division of Tourism.

"Capturing an increased share of the Canadian market is a significant component of VisitRochester's 2008 business plan," said Ed Hall, president and chief executive of VisitRochester.

Representatives from George Eastman House, Strong National Museum of Play and Wilmorite's malls are among those making the trip.



Its a miracle! VisitRochester is finally marketing our malls to Canadians! Buffalo has been making $ hand over fist from Canadians at its malls. What did it take, 3 years? I think the value of the dollar has been in the toilet that long. Wow, we are fast on the uptake!



Although I dont consider Farmington to be Rochester, we see how more and more Monroe County residents keep moving to nearby Ontario County. 800 new homes planned in Farmington alone!

Growth may lead Farmington to lose DiPacific's Restaurant to Walgreens
Democrat and Chronicle

In a town that does not have a Main Street, DiPacific's Restaurant and Party House has become the closest thing to a town square, a place for Chamber of Commerce meetings, wedding receptions and school reunions.

But the family-owned restaurant, a mainstay at the intersection of Routes 332 and 96, probably will be torn down to make way for a Walgreens drugstore, another step from farming town to suburban community. Some residents are concerned that the town is losing its rural roots.

If Walgreens gets final approval July 2 from the Farmington Planning Board, DiPacific's probably would close by the end of August.

Helen DiPacific, 73, is torn by the decision to sell her land for a chain drugstore. She says she really doesn't want to go out of business, but the pending sale will allow her to do other things to help the community. She notes that she will still have a presence at the intersection with her Dari-An snack bar.

"Some of the townspeople are not too happy," said Town Historian Margaret Hartsough, who like many other Farmington residents has gone to DiPacific's for years.

Their disapproval is not directed at DiPacific, whose restaurant has been in her family for almost six decades. She is treasured by the community and says she often is approached by local residents who regret the closure of her restaurant.

But tensions increasingly are bubbling up as this growing town of about 11,000 goes through an identity crisis. The latest example has been the ongoing debate over Farmington's recreational activities.

Newcomers such as Chris Brinza, 36, who moved to Farmington with his family less than six years ago, are demanding more recreational services from the town and do not object to the surge in development and arrival of chain stores.

"I think it's inevitable. Victor has expanded. It is working its way to Farmington," said Brinza, who is a regional credit manager for United Agri Products.

Walgreens move

Some residents already were upset about the traffic at routes 332 and 96 — the area in northwest Ontario County called the "growth corridor" — but that is what helped draw Walgreens to the intersection. "It is a combination of a strong, growing population, a steady, growing traffic count and market studies showing that it is underserved," said Guy Hart Jr., managing partner for Syracuse-based HDL Property Group.

HDL will buy the land from DiPacific and build the 14,550-square-foot structure, which will be leased to Walgreens. Hart would not disclose what his company is paying for the land, but typically, he added, such purchases exceed $1.5 million. He hopes to have the Walgreens open by next summer.

Currently about a dozen Walgreens operate or are planned in the Rochester area, but this is the first for Farmington.

Some question the need for a Walgreens, since there is a CVS at this intersection. And they hope DiPacific's remains open.

"I don't think it has to close. The area needs a restaurant," said Whitey Hettlinger, 63, a jockey agent and longtime regular at DiPacific's.

Others worry that Farmington is losing its character.

"It has grown way too much. I liked it back when it was country," said Larry Potter, 68, who served on the Town Board for 28 years until retiring last year. While a building contractor, Potter said, he stayed away from the big housing developments that are now popping up in Farmington.

Development also is transforming the "four corners" at routes 332 and 96.

In addition to Walgreens at the northwest corner of the intersection, an ALDI grocery store near the southwest corner is slated for approval by the Planning Board this month. A Comfort Inn recently opened next to DiPacific's, a Dunkin' Donuts is being built near the southeast corner, and a McDonald's stands at the northeast corner.

Dave Goehring, regional traffic engineer for the state Department of Transportation, said the expansion of Route 332 — completed in 2002 — from two lanes to four, with turn lanes at key intersections, should be sufficient to handle the increase in traffic.

In 2006, the traffic near this intersection averaged 21,368 vehicles a day on Route 332 and 16,805 on Route 96.

In addition, more vehicles will use Route 332 from about 800 homes planned on former farmland west of Route 332 and from the proposed Glacier Lakes Resort and Indoor Waterworld, which would feature a water park, on the east side of Route 332.

Ron Brand, director of planning and development, said that while the roads can handle the additional traffic, the 332/96 intersection needs attention. "You have to slow down the traffic," he said.

Rural roots

Farmington was established as a farming community 220 years ago. Some of the descendants of early settlers still make their living off the land in a town that had a population of only 1,399 in 1950.

But with the opening of the Thruway exit at Farmington in 1948, the town experienced a growth spurt. Its population grew by half during the 1950s and, boosted by the opening of Finger Lakes Gaming and Race Track in 1962, rose 69 percent in the next decade.

The population then more than doubled during the 1970s, from 3,565 to 8,922.

DiPacific's was built in 1950 by Helen's father, James "Jimmy" DiPacific, who was a successful grocer in East Rochester. The farmland had been owned by the Weigert family.

"I can remember driving up to the Thruway on a tractor and seeing (Gov.) Thomas E. Dewey waving in a car with a top down on the Thruway," said Ken Weigert, whose father, Herman, sold a slice of farmland to DiPacific.

James DiPacific was killed in a traffic accident in 1953. Anna, his wife, continued to run the restaurant and was soon joined by Helen, who took over as sole owner after her mother's death in 2000.

Dari-An, with limited seating inside, opened about 1960 as a separate business next to the restaurant. DiPacific's draw increased in the mid-1980s when a party house with seating for 300 was added.

DiPacific's, just a couple of blocks from the racetrack, became a regular stop not only for workers there but also for area residents drawn by the food, which ranges from Italian cuisine to steak to Friday night fish fries.

"There was always good food and good atmosphere," said longtime customer Audrey Everdyke, 71, of Farmington.

Helen DiPacific is known to arrive at the restaurant in the morning and, splitting her time between the restaurant and Dari-An, work until 1 a.m.

She has built up a devoted clientele and staff.

"Once you work for Dari-An and DiPacific's, you are always an employee," said Janice Shannon, 49, who — like her two children — worked for DiPacific and now considers her former boss a friend.

DiPacific, meanwhile, says she has no plans to sell the property on which Dari-An sits. She will continue running her snack bar and is looking into developing land she owns just north of the restaurant.

"I'm not leaving," she said.
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Old June 6th, 2008, 07:14 PM   #85
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PAETEC Tower

In today's D&C article about the PAETEC project and the selection of Gilbane, Inc. as developer:

"It's height and cost could vary because PAETEC is getting requests for additional floors from high-end office users and condominium developers, Chesonis said."


Are we looking at a mixed-use tower here? I'm not sure if that's odd or not, but I haven't encountered a lot of mixing in the bigger towers, mostly because the space is so expensive for residences. This is Rochester, though, so prices may be within reach.
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Old June 10th, 2008, 07:18 PM   #86
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Academy Bldg. Renovation Planned
RNEWS 9

It hasn't happened in decades, but Rochester is now racing to keep up with downtown development. One example is the Academy Building on South Fitzhugh Street.

Florida developer George Traikos is working to renovate the site. He also bought the old Carriage Factory near the Susan B. Anthony neighborhood.

Traikos says retailers catering to the needs of downtown workers will fill the Academy Building's first floor.

"We've done a study based on some information from the International Council of shopping Centers and we've come to the conclusion that about $112 million a year are spent by the daytime population on retail purchases," Traikos said.

Fourteen luxury apartments are also planned for the Academy Building's third and fourth floors. Office space is planned for the second floor.


Traikos Website: http://www.traikos.us/proj_details.php?project_ID=25
Check out the site and floor plans, good stuff. I LOVE this building.

On page 6 of the Leasing brochure is a picture of the old Rochester Savings Bank, it makes me cry that that building was torn down, what a shame.

http://www.traikos.us/proj_details.php?project_ID=33
Im not sure if this guy knows what he is doing, since he just owns a bunch of dumpy apt buildings in FL, but Im hoping.



Really nice pic of the city.


RenSquare gets support from small-business owners
Democrat and Chronicle

A group of small-business owners came out in the rain on Tuesday to support Renaissance Square, the $230 million project which would combine a bus terminal, college and arts center along East Main Street in downtown Rochester.

A press conference was assembled by county leaders this Tuesday morning at 150 E. Main St., a RenSquare building which is empty — for now.

John Julian, the retired owner of Julian’s Dry Cleaners, said his family would be interested in establishing its second Rochester store if RenSquare is built.

James Rodgers of Rochester said he even moved back from Tallahassee, Fla., to start a second concession near the site.

“It kind of gave me hope,” said Rodgers, who owns and operates two units of Muncheez Concessions in Florida and downtown Rochester.
Rodgers said he hears some negativity about the project, but explains to people it will revitalize downtown.

“I’m telling people to support it,” said Rodgers.

Maggie Brooks, Monroe County executive, said her staff is working around the clock to keep the project within budget.


Im against posting any Ren Square articles until I see demo happen, but I thought it was nice to see a positive outlook by the D and C.
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Old June 10th, 2008, 07:23 PM   #87
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Where it stands: Historic High Point
Messenger Post Newspapers

With the first building of the High Point Business Park nearly complete on the hilltop overlooking Easview Mall on Route 96 in Victor, a much smaller proposal by the same developer is coming to a crucial point.

The Victor Town Board will soon decide whether to rezone a nearly two-acre lot where the Rainaldi family of Rochester wants to create a historic-looking plaza of three buildings. The land would have to be rezoned from residential to planned development.

About the project
The Historic High Point retail project calls for the renovation of an 1800s cobblestone schoolhouse and the construction of two structures of 7,000 and 5,400 square feet.

The triangle-shaped lot is on the corner of High Street, High Street Extension and Route 96, next to the 100-plus acre property where the High Point Business Park is going up.

The two new buildings and cobblestone would be designed to look like an old village, complete with antique-looking lampposts, said Fred Rainaldi Jr. There is no word on who the tenants would be, though Rainaldi’s father, Fred Sr., has said he would like to rent to a bakery like Cheesy Eddie’s, which has a store on South Avenue in Rochester, and a wine-tasting and education center to complement the Constellation Brands headquarters, which moving from Perinton to High Point.

What’s at stake
Rezoning is a hot-button issue in burgeoning Victor. Town officials seem to agree that Victor’s zoning is out of date. In some areas, residential neighborhoods straddle high-intensity commercial lots with little or no buffer. The town also has a seeming overabundance of industrial-zoned land. The Town Board has begun work to revise the comprehensive plan, essentially a series of zoning recommendations. Until that plan is complete, though, some have argued that the town should hold off rezoning parcels here and there, a practice referred to as spot zoning. On the other side are landowners who believe they should not be prevented from selling their property or developing it due to the lack of an updated plan.

At a May 27 public hearing, Douglas Fisher, a critic of the board’s vote to rezone for the High Point Business Park, opposed the latest rezoning proposal. He asked the board to “consider the larger neighborhood and its character” — surely referring to Valentown Museum, formerly owned by his father, the late J. Sheldon Fisher. Property owner and Cork Road resident Jerry Colyer told the board, “People that own things have rights. ... If you have a project that makes sense for the community, the town should have an opportunity to change things.”

What’s next
The town’s Planning Board in April recommended that the Town Board approve the rezoning. The Town Board is expected to cast its vote June 9.

Meanwhile, the town’s Architectural Review Board has given a thumbs up to the project. Town Historian Babette Huber, said at the public hearing: “We’ve come a long way with the architecture. ... I have nothing but positive remarks to give you about this project.”

Rainaldi said he would spare several old maple trees on the site, and the Rochester Museum and Science Center has conducted archeological studies to ensure the site was not laden with artifacts. He added that three traffic consultants have reviewed the plans, including the town’s own former consultants from SRF Associates.



Homearama is coming soon:
http://rochesterbusinessjournal.com/...cfm?sdid=73568
http://www.rochesterhomebuilders.com...a2008/home.htm


RIT Dubai is a done deal:
http://www.rbj.net/fullarticle.cfm?sdid=73566


The Fed says crime has gone down in all of NYS:
http://democratandchronicle.com/apps...28/1003/NEWS01


Retailers endorse Renaissance Square
Rochester Business Journal

Rochester-area retailers, along with M&T Bank Corp. Rochester Division President Daniel Burns, on Tuesday endorsed the proposed $230 million Renaissance Square development.
The project would include a bus station, a performing-arts center and a downtown campus for Monroe Community College on the northwest corner of East Main Street and Clinton Avenue.
Supporters gathered near the site Tuesday morning to promote the project. A similar news conference last week featured two local labor unions in support of the development.
“Renaissance Square will provide substantial foot traffic every day from the people who ride the bus or go to MCC,” Burns said in a statement released Tuesday by project administrator Main and Clinton Local Development Corp. “Its location is also solid because of the number of people who work within a block of here.”
New retail space and staffing for Renaissance Square and MCC would result in 300 jobs, Main and Clinton officials said in the release. The retail component would be as large as 15,000 square feet.
A public workshop for inspection and comment is scheduled for 6 to 8 p.m. Thursday at the Rochester Riverside Convention Center. Main and Clinton representatives are expected to select a preferred concept June 17.


The new GRE business newsletter came out:
http://files.e2ma.net/6659/assets/do...newsletter.pdf

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Old June 11th, 2008, 06:58 PM   #88
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Wegmans Expansion Adds Local Jobs
RNEWS 9

A home grown company is making the attempt to keep jobs in Rochester. Wegmans presented an expansion proposal to the Chili Town Planning Board that could create a few hundred jobs in coming years.

Wegmans headquarters on Brooks Ave. will be a little less crowded if the Chili Town Planning Board approves the expansion.

The proposal looks to the Wegmans Industrial Park on Market Street off Chili Avenue.

Wegmans reps say the 400,000 sq. ft., four story project hopes to relieve crowded offices in other locations.

It could also bring hundreds of job opportunities in years to come. Tuesday night's conceptual review was an initial introduction to the building project.

"We're dedicated, loyal to the community in appreciation for what the community has provided to Wegmans. As well as we want to continue to grow our market here," Wegmans Project Manager Arthur Pires said.

"I see it as, certainly, a significant economic gain for the town. In the future, even some of the employees working there may want to relocate to the town to be closer to where they work," Town of Chili Planning Board Chair, James Martin said.

The planning board will hold a public hearing July 10. The board is expected to make a decision by August. If Wegmans gets the approval, builders will break ground as early as Spring of 2010.


Wegmans may move Tastings to former drug store
Democrat and Chronicle

Wegmans Food Markets Inc. wants to move its Tastings restaurant across Monroe Avenue to the building formerly occupied by a Rite Aid drugstore.

The Pittsford Planning Board approved a special use permit for the project at its meeting Monday. Wegmans is expected to go before the town's Architectural Review Board on June 23 for final approval.

Wegmans' plans to remodel the former drug store at 3220 Monroe Ave. — a 10,700 square-foot, one-level structure — to allow for outdoor seating and additional parking.

The current Tastings restaurant is a 10,000-square-foot, two-level building with the bar and restaurant downstairs; and banquet, private dining and meeting rooms upstairs. After the move, the Tastings space would be incorporated into the adjacent grocery store, said Wegmans spokeswoman Jo Natale.

"We are in the preliminary stages of design," she said. "No timeframe has been set."

Tastings opened in 2002 as Wegmans' first full-service, sit-down restaurant.

It offers a basic American food menu with influences from around the globe.

The 114-seat restaurant also features chef's tables where diners can watch the kitchen staff at work.


Canadian firm becomes RTP tenant
Rochester Business Journal

A Canadian company is making Rochester Technology Park home for one of its manufacturing hubs, RTP’s owners said Wednesday.
RTP’s owners, based in Brooklyn, have recruited a handful of new tenants to Eastman Kodak Co.’s former Elmgrove facility. Since last year when the Tryad Group purchased RTP, occupancy has increased from 800,000 square feet to over 1.3 million square feet.
The Canadian company, Weldrite Closures Inc. in Building 8, will add 50,000 square feet. Total, the Technology Park covers 5 million square feet of space.
Weldrite manufactures doors and hatches for ships and ocean-drilling platforms, as well as closures that provide airtight seals in bio-hazard laboratories. The firm expects to add 40 jobs here over the next three years.
Dick Knapp, Weldrite general manager said the company already created 20 of those new jobs within the past two months.
Knapp said Weldrite chose the Tech Park over a location in Connecticut in part for the amenities there that are critical to the company’s operations.
Weldrite joins Pepsi Bottling Group, Hammer Packaging and Citigroup Inc. as the latest tenant to lease space at RTP.
Beyond RTP, Tryad Group owns millions of square feet of industrial properties, as well as multifamily and mixed-use properties in New York and nationwide.


Another Abbott’s to open in Fla.
Rochester Business Journal

Abbott’s Frozen Custard is opening its second store location in the Naples-Ft. Myers, Fla. market Friday. Joseph Francher, president of the Francher Group, owns the new location, in addition to another Naples store. The Francher Group plans to open several more Abbott’s locations in the region in the next two to four years. Abbott’s Frozen Custard, established in 1902, is based in Rochester and has more than 40 locations.




Im just posting this because I like Jazz, I think its a nice compilation of places to check out, it has nothing to do with dev, sorry: http://www.rochestercitynewspaper.co...Jazz+hangouts/

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Old June 12th, 2008, 05:15 PM   #89
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Funny how in such a short period of time the occupancy has risen that dramatically at the Tech Park eh?
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Old June 12th, 2008, 07:58 PM   #90
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Funny how in such a short period of time the occupancy has risen that dramatically at the Tech Park eh?
I know, right? It just took getting the right owner who knows what they are doing to get the ball rolling. That Cohen guy from Cali (previous owner)didnt have the right contacts.

Its good someone else is posting on here with me, all I hear is crickets when Im on SSC. Rocguy must have a great summer internship, I havent seen him on here in a long time. MAT and Bdaly give a sporadic shout out, which is cool. I guess this site just doesnt have a Rochester following. What type of other dev websites do people post on? Citydata? Are there Roc peeps on SSP?
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Old June 12th, 2008, 08:21 PM   #91
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Its good someone else is posting on here with me, all I hear is crickets when Im on SSC. Rocguy must have a great summer internship, I havent seen him on here in a long time. MAT and Bdaly give a sporadic shout out, which is cool. I guess this site just doesnt have a Rochester following. What type of other dev websites do people post on? Citydata? Are there Roc peeps on SSP?
It's funny. When there were "debates," this was active as can be. Now that it's essentially being used as it's intended, it's pretty quiet as there's less of a discussion. I do check this daily, I just haven't had too much to comment on. (And, I recently got married and was in Ireland for a while.)

It seems like some good projects are underway or are on the drawing board. I'm happy to see the High Falls apartments coming together so quickly--that should really help inject 24/7 life into the district and make the vacant restaurants viable again.

It should be a busy weekend in the city center once again--Jazz Fest, Maplewood Rose Weekend, Red Wings, Rhinos Friday, Rattlers Saturday. You can tell it's the Spring/Summer festival season.
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Old June 12th, 2008, 10:38 PM   #92
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It's funny. When there were "debates," this was active as can be. Now that it's essentially being used as it's intended, it's pretty quiet as there's less of a discussion. I do check this daily, I just haven't had too much to comment on. (And, I recently got married and was in Ireland for a while.)

It seems like some good projects are underway or are on the drawing board. I'm happy to see the High Falls apartments coming together so quickly--that should really help inject 24/7 life into the district and make the vacant restaurants viable again.

It should be a busy weekend in the city center once again--Jazz Fest, Maplewood Rose Weekend, Red Wings, Rhinos Friday, Rattlers Saturday. You can tell it's the Spring/Summer festival season.

Yeah Ive got major plans for the weekend starting with a tour of the High Falls brewery tonight. Free taste testing!

American Packaging breaks ground on new facility
Rochester Business Journal

Ground was broken Thursday on American Packaging Corp.’s $9.3 million, 14,000-square-foot facility.
Monroe County Executive Maggie Brooks, Rochester Mayor Robert Duffy and other officials joined Peter Schottland, the firm’s president and CEO, at the morning event.
American Packaging, with a 100-year history in Rochester, employs 500 — with some 150 in Rochester — and has sites in Iowa and Wisconsin. It moved its headquarters to Rochester in 2001. Company officials said the expansion would add 25 new jobs locally over the next three years.
The company, located on Driving Park Avenue, specializes in making flexible packaging laminations for specialty markets.
The Rochester plant's products have included lids for Pringles chips, ready-to-go cereal bowls for customers including Kellogg Co. and General Mills Inc., and paper lids for instant lunches.



$50k to help city’s real estate market
Rochester Business Journal

A $50,000, two-year initiative was launched Thursday to reinvigorate stagnant real estate markets in Rochester city middle-neighborhoods.
Such communities are described as neighborhoods that do not grab headlines for high crime rates or get significant investment. The Realtors Charitable Foundation and NeighborWorks, a non-profit run in Rochester, focuses on areas it calls economically stagnant with its program, Rochester’s Healthy Blocks.
Developed to rehabilitate an area of the South Wedge in 2005, the Healthy Blocks strategy is based on a national model called Healthy Neighborhoods. It was deployed in cities similar in size to Rochester, such as Battlecreek, Mich. and Hartford, Conn.
Three years ago in the Swillburg neighborhood, the organization met with residents to find out what would improve the attractiveness of their neighborhood.
“There was a chain-link fence there that was an eye sore. It had been crushed by snow removal equipment,” said Amy DeSouza, spokeswoman at Greater Rochester Association of Realtors Inc. Through Healthy Blocks, she said, the area was restored and afterwards, residents worked together to garden and maintain the area.
In addition to Swillburg, Healthy Blocks has supported work in targeted areas of the 19th Ward and Brooks Landing.
GRAR, with approximately 3,000 members in the region, funds the Realtors Charitable Foundation.
The foundation Thursday announced it would provide the two-year grant to launch Healthy Blocks in the areas between East Main Street, Atlantic Avenue, Woodstock Street and Akron Street, including Newcroft Park.
The partnership will enable real estate agents to get involved and make a strategic impact on the community, said Kimberly Russell, chairwoman of the foundation.

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Old June 13th, 2008, 12:06 AM   #93
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What up y'all? Sorry addict, I figure you have the news covered so I pretty much only post when I learn of something new or have an opinion to share. I sometimes take a look at other cities' forums and so many are full of incessant inane ramblings. I'm proud that ours has become somewhat laid back and focused. Speaking of which, below are the renderings of the preferred design for Renaissance Square, as presented at this evening's public meeting. I'm once again disappointed that they didn't get the memo to do what I want, but alas, jagged glass IS all the rage these days.





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Old June 13th, 2008, 01:13 AM   #94
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I know, right? It just took getting the right owner who knows what they are doing to get the ball rolling. That Cohen guy from Cali (previous owner)didnt have the right contacts.

Its good someone else is posting on here with me, all I hear is crickets when Im on SSC. Rocguy must have a great summer internship, I havent seen him on here in a long time. MAT and Bdaly give a sporadic shout out, which is cool. I guess this site just doesnt have a Rochester following. What type of other dev websites do people post on? Citydata? Are there Roc peeps on SSP?
I'm working as a counselor at a summer camp...I have about 1 hour a day of free time where I don't have to be with the kids, and its a toss up whether or not I get to use one of the few computers they have here durring free time. I have 2 weeks off in the end of June, and then come back for the second session July 2. So I'll be in Rochester June 27th-July 1st.


btw I think its great Wegmans is expanding its headquarters and adding jobs; but it seems kind of dissapointing that it will be in Chili...they should follow Paetec's lead and invest in downtown.
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Old June 13th, 2008, 02:58 AM   #95
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cool! while I am not the biggest fan of Ren Square, those new pics show a lot more detail than any others i have seen. The new bus station section is interesting with the tiered roof. It looks like they were smart enough for some street level retail also, overall the design is nicer than i had expected. Although I still think the city should avoid these mega projects, especially after the fast ferry...

While i have checked this site often, i decided to register after RochesterAddict mentioned how quiet this tread was
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Old June 13th, 2008, 07:23 AM   #96
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Hey, I got everyone to comment back with my comment. Nice!

I think the design for Ren Square looks great. Its 2008 trendy, which Rochester needs a little bit of.

While its not a progressive design, I think it will add to the city.


BTW, I took one of the 1st ever tours of the High Falls Brewery tonight.

It was pretty sweet, I really enjoyed myself and it was cool to see all that they are doing. High Falls Brewing has a lot of marketing planned in the near future. High Falls has always been like the Willy Wonka Factory in Rochester, never really opening up the brewery to the public. A lot of sweet taste testing tonight as well!


On my way home I took a scenic tour from the brewery on St Paul to get back to Penfield.

On Franklin St I noticed that someone took the old 90's club that burned down and gutted it. (Im not old enough to know the club, I think it was called City Lights?) The building has beautiful architecture and is very old. It looks like they turned it into 2 condos. Its still in the area of the sketchy Salvation Army, but perhaps the neighborhood will continue to turn around? Progress is good.
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Old June 13th, 2008, 12:27 PM   #97
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Generally speaking the design is nice, but I am left a little underwhelmed since this project has been talked about for so many years and I am left with a slight feeling "this is it?" It will definitely be a nice addition to the street, especially if they really take advantage of ground floor retail and tenants are found that will truly add foot traffic to the street.

While I do like the contrasting elements that make it look like multiple structures, I don't like the plain silver cladding on top of the corner bulding. It looks like an office park somewhere.
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Old June 13th, 2008, 02:57 PM   #98
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Generally speaking the design is nice, but I am left a little underwhelmed since this project has been talked about for so many years and I am left with a slight feeling "this is it?" It will definitely be a nice addition to the street, especially if they really take advantage of ground floor retail and tenants are found that will truly add foot traffic to the street.

While I do like the contrasting elements that make it look like multiple structures, I don't like the plain silver cladding on top of the corner bulding. It looks like an office park somewhere.
I think that the "this is it" feeling is based on the fact that we were first working with a “star architect” who put together a design that was WAY more then this project needed or could afford. He painted a pretty picture… and those images became what people expected. Now the local architects are faced with the task of making this project real. Although this project may not look the way we all envisioned… I commend the architects for what they have done. I think that this project will be great for the City of Rochester.

RochesterAddict… there are many of us out here reading this blog. Keep posting!!
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Old June 13th, 2008, 11:44 PM   #99
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Riedman Corp. buys Neisner Building
Rochester Business Journal

Riedman Corp., owner of the Riedman Tower at 45 East Ave. and the Rochester office of the state Supreme Court Fourth Department Appellate Division at 50 East Ave., is buying the vacant Neisner Building at 49 East Ave with tentative plans to add commercial, residential, and office space.


Kodak to repair, restore tower exterior
Rochester Business Journal

Eastman Kodak Co. plans to repair and restore the exterior of its headquarters on State Street over the next three years.
“The Kodak Tower has long been an important symbol to Kodak people and it has been (a) landmark in the Rochester skyline for generations,” said Chairman and CEO Antonio Perez, in a statement. “Rochester is our home, and this announcement is another sign of our continuing commitment to this community and our role as a global leader in the imaging business.”
The work is slated to begin mid-summer and continue through 2010. It will require installation of scaffolding for the duration of the project, Kodak said. The primary focus of the work will be repairs to the masonry of the building, which dates back to 1916.
A Kodak spokesman declined to provide the estimated cost for the work, which remains in the project engineering stage. The company also has not “fully identified” who will do the work,” said Christopher Veranda, Kodak manager of communications initiatives.
Deterioration and cracks in the masonry at numerous locations were found in a study completed last year by an architectural engineering firm, Kodak said. The building was found to be structurally sound, but the masonry repairs were identified as required to maintain the structure’s safety and integrity.
The first 16 floors of the Kodak Tower were completed in 1916, while the three top floors were added in 1935. The top floors contain architectural features such as intricate terra cotta masonry and a promenade roof. It will be the first comprehensive repair project in the building’s history, Kodak said.
The extensive exterior work requires the company to relocate the peregrine falcon nesting box in the rooftop cupola. Kodak said it is working with the New York State Department of Environmental Conservation on a plan to relocate the nesting box after the fledging of the current brood of five baby falcons.
Kodak already has been doing some renovation work inside Kodak Tower.
“We’re doing some sprucing up on the inside, too, that was neglected for some time, as well. Painting (in Kodak colors), patching up some walls and putting up new images are the major part of it,” said Christopher Veranda, Kodak manager of communications initiatives.


Port officials reject ferry proposals
Rochester Business Journal

Port officials in Rochester and Toronto have rejected two proposals for ferry service between the cities, Rochester city officials announced Friday.
Representatives of both cities reviewed proposals from Hover Transit Services, based northwest of Toronto, and from Sevstars, a previously undisclosed respondent based in Perinton, to a request for qualifications issued in late March.
Neither proposal exhibited the organizational or fiscal capability to succeed, officials said.
“We needed to determine whether there was sufficient interest on the part of potential investors to pursue the idea further,” Rochester Mayor Robert Duffy said in a statement. “We continue to explore the many possibilities that exist in order to fully showcase and capitalize on our port. It’s a tremendous asset.”
The Hover Transit proposal included two hovercrafts, which fly on a cushion of air and are pushed by propellers.
The Sevstars proposal involved a vehicle that is a cross between a hovercraft and an aircraft, officials said. It moves with a cushion of air created by aerodynamic interaction between its wings and the water surface.
Port officials will not actively pursue a ferry service across Lake Ontario, but will consider any proposal with adequate financial and organizational resources, they said.
Rochester is studying the market and locations for a possible marina basin at the Charlotte port, and is exploring a Lake Ontario natural resource center with SUNY College at Brockport, officials said.
It also is pursuing uses for the ferry terminal, of which the city took possession last month in a buyout agreement with former owner Maplestar Development Co. LLC, a subsidiary of failed fast ferry operator Canadian American Transportation Systems LLC.



Another story on Ren Square, yawn. BUT, the video on the left side is a great way to see the new design!
http://democratandchronicle.com/apps...NTPAGECAROUSEL
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Old June 14th, 2008, 04:53 PM   #100
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I think finally seeing all the elements put together at Ren Square helps to really lay out what they are trying to do to joe public. Instead of 2d drawings it is nice to see a 3d drawing with all the elements put on paper.

The 3d flyover is pretty neat too. I guess if they are going to go ahead with the project, just put a shovel in the ground already. The longer they wait the more money it will continue to cost with rising construction costs across the board.

Also with the increase in gasoline prices, I'm thinking a new and fairly standard major bus hub is what RTS needs to appeal to more people to actually ride the system. The route seem to be more confusing than they need to be.

On top of that with a huge and unprecedented increase in Amtrak funding, could we see train travel in this country actually expand? Instead of just limping along like it always has? Hopefully that means they finally rebuild the Amtrak terminal downtown as well!
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