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Old March 29th, 2014, 06:44 PM   #1
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India | Mountain Railways

From Wikipedia

Mountain railways of India are the six or seven odd "chhotey" (Hindi for small) lines, out of around 20 similar such narrow or metre gauge remaining in operation around the world. Built during the nineteenth and early twentieth century of British colonial rule (the Raj), these lines have been running since then. Today the Indian Railways runs them, along with the Kashmir Railway, operational since 2005. While four of these seven: the Darjeeling Himalayan Railway (1881), the Kalka–Shimla Railway (1898), the Kangra Valley Railway (1924), and the Kashmir Railway (2005), are in the rugged hill regions of the Himalayas of Northern India, two are further down south in the Western Ghats: the Nilgiri Mountain Railway in Tamil Nadu, and the Matheran Hill Railway in Maharashtra; while the Lumding–Silchar line, built at the turn of the 20th century, lies deep inside Assam, in the Barak river valley of the Cachar Hills. The Darjeeling Himalayan Railway, the Nilgiri Mountain Railway and the Kalka–Shimla Railway have collectively been designated as a UNESCO World Heritage Site.

The mountain railway systems in India include:

Name: Darjeeling Himalayan Railway
Length(KM):88
Length(MI):55
Constructed:1881
Type:Narrow Gauge
Gauge:2 ft (610 mm)

Name:Kalka–Shimla Railway
Length(KM):96
Length(MI):60
Constructed:1903
Type:Narrow Gauge
Gauge:2 ft 6 in (762 mm)

Name:Kangra Valley Railway
Length(KM):164
Length(MI):102
Constructed:1929
Type:Narrow Gauge
Gauge:2 ft 6 in (762 mm)

Name:Matheran Hill Railway
Length(KM):20
Length(MI):12
Constructed:1907
Type:Narrow Gauge
Gauge:2 ft (610 mm)

Name:Nilgiri Mountain Railway
Length(KM):46
Length(MI):29
Constructed:1908
Type:Meter Gauge
Gauge:1,000 mm (3 ft 3 3⁄8 in)
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Old March 29th, 2014, 06:47 PM   #2
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Mountain Railways of India as World Heritage Sites

This site includes three railways. The Darjeeling Himalayan Railway was the first, and is still the most outstanding, example of a hill passenger railway. Opened in 1881, its design applies bold and ingenious engineering solutions to the problem of establishing an effective rail link across a mountainous terrain of great beauty. The construction of the Nilgiri Mountain Railway, a 46-km long metre-gauge single-track railway in Tamil Nadu State was first proposed in 1854, but due to the difficulty of the mountainous location the work only started in 1891 and was completed in 1908. This railway, scaling an elevation of 326 m to 2,203 m, represented the latest technology of the time. The Kalka Shimla Railway, a 96-km long, single track working rail link built in the mid-19th century to provide a service to the highland town of Shimla is emblematic of the technical and material efforts to disenclave mountain populations through the railway. All three railways are still fully operational.

http://whc.unesco.org/en/list/944

The Mountain Railways of India are outstanding examples of hill railways. Opened between 1881 and 1908 they applied bold and ingenious engineering solutions to the problem of establishing an effective rail link across a mountainous terrain of great beauty. They are still fully operational as living examples of the engineering enterprise of the late 19th and early 20th centuries.
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Old March 29th, 2014, 06:48 PM   #3
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Darjeeling Himalayan Railway

The Darjeeling Himalayan Railway is intimately linked with the development of Darjeeling as the queen of hill stations and one of the main tea-growing areas in India, in the early 19th century. The densely wooded mountain spur on which Darjeeling now stands was formerly part of the Kingdom of Sikkim. It was adopted by the British East India Company as a rest and recovery station for its soldiers in 1835, when the area was leased from Sikkim and building of the hill station began, linked to the plains by road. In 1878 the Eastern Bengal Railway submitted a detailed proposal for a steam railway from Siliguri, already linked with Calcutta to Darjeeling. This received official approval and construction work began immediately, and by 1881 it had been completed. Since 1958 it has been managed by the State-owned Northeast Frontier Railway.

The DHR consists of 88.48 km of 2 ft (0.610 m) gauge track that connects New Jalpaiguri with Darjeeling, passing through eleven stations between the two termini. One of these, Ghoom, is the second highest railway station in the world, at an altitude of 2258m. Because it passes through a mountainous region, 73% of the total length of the line consists of curves, the sharpest of which is that between Sukna and Rongtong, where the track passes through 120°. There are six reverses and three loops on the line, the most famous of these being the Batasia Loop between Ghoom and Darjeeling. The steepest gradient is 1 in 18 (in zigzag reverses). The Toy Train, as it is affectionately known, affords breathtaking views of high waterfalls, green valleys that are often hidden by cloud, and at its end the splendid panorama of the snow-capped Kanchenjunga range. There are several distinct sections: the 10 km plains section between Siliguri and Sukna (partly urban and partly agricultural), the 11 km densely forested section from Sukna to beyond Rongtong, the 38 km largely deforested open hill section with its many tea gardens to Kurseong, and finally the 30 km alpine section to Darjeeling, dominated by stands of Himalayan pine and tea gardens.

Route



Copyright: © OUR PLACE The World Heritage Collection
Author: OUR PLACE The World Heritage Collection






DHR Terminal at New Jalpaiguri Jn Railway Station


Sonada


GHUM


Batasia Loop of Darjeeling Himalayan Railway

English: The Batasia Loop was created to lower the gradient of ascent of the Darjeeling Himalayan Railway in Darjeeling district of West Bengal, India. At this point, the track spirals around over itself through a tunnel and over a hilltop. It was commissioned in 1919.

Original image caption:

TOY TRAIN OF N.F. RAILWAY AT BATASIA LOOP, DARJEELING, INDIA
PHOTOGRAPH BY : VIKRAMJIT KAKATI


CC PP Yoonus
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Old March 29th, 2014, 06:54 PM   #4
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Nilgiri Mountain Railway

The history of NMR dates back to 1854 when proposals were first made by the British to build a railway up the hills. Work began on the Madras-Coimbatore line (5'6") in 1853, and the branch to Mettupalaiyam opened in 1873. The problem was how to replace the tedious ascent by bullock-cart or pony to Coonoor. In 1873, the district engineer of the Nilgiris, J.L.L. Morant, proposed building a rack railway, but the first offers were reclined. Sir Guildford Molesworth, the former engineer in chief of the Ceylon Government Railway, acting as consultant to the Government of India, advised a rack and adhesion line on the model of the Abt system built in the Harz Mountains in Germany. In 1882, M. Riggenbach, the Swiss inventor of Rigi rack railway, submitted a proposal for the construction of the railway line. This was accepted, and the Nilgiri Rigi Railway Company Ltd was formed in 1885. The work was inaugurated in 1891, and finally completed in 1908. Subsequently the railway was run by different companies, and was then incorporated into the Southern Railway in 1951. The British began to move into this region of India in around 1820, and the first railway projects were particularly early, in the 1840s. However the broad gauges then used (1.67 m) were basically incompatible with any idea of providing rail transport to the hill regions.

The Nilgiri Mountain Railway consists of 45.88 km of a 1 m gauge single-track, partly rack-and-pinion railway that connects Mettupalayiyam to Udagamandalam in Tamil Nadu State. The railway can be divided into three sections:

Some 7 km, from Mettupalaiyam to Kallar (elevation 405 m), across the central plain of Tamil Nadu, with its betel-nut palm and other plantations. Maximum speed is 30 km/h called the Blue Mountain Express, the name of which was changed recently to the native Nilgiri Express.

The rack section of the line, from Kallar to Coonoor (elevation 1,712 m). There are 208 curves and 13 tunnels, and 27 viaducts. The Kallar Bridge over the River Bhawani, the Adderley Viaduct and the Burliar Bridge are examples of such composite bridges. Here, the railway climbs through almost uninhabited, tropical jungle.

A stretch of 18 km runs through a landscape with dominant eucalyptus and acacia forest. The railway continues to climb across the Nilgiris until it reaches the summit, just before the terminus of Udagamandalam at 2,203 m.

Copyright: © Ana Draskovic
Author: Ana Draskovic




Track with Abt double rack on Nilgiris Mountain Railway

Route


0 km Mettupalayam(Coimbatore)

8 km Kallar

13 km Adderly

18 km Hillgrove

21 km Runneymede

25 km Kateri Road

28 km Coonoor

29 km Wellington

32 km Aruvankadu

38 km Ketti

42 km Lovedale

46 km Ooty


Author: Prakhar


Nilgiri Mountain Railway train waits to depart from Ketti Station. The locomotive is No.37384. 26th February 2005
Photographer - A.M.Hurrell



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Old March 29th, 2014, 07:04 PM   #5
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Kalka Shimla Railway

The Kalka Shimla Railway, a 96.6 kilometer long, single track working rail link built in the mid-19th century to provide a service to the highland town of Shimla is emblematic of the technical and material efforts to disenclave mountain populations through the railway. The world's highest multi-arc gallery bridge and the world's longest tunnel (at the time of construction) of the KSR were the a testimony toof the brilliantce engineering skills applied to make this a dream a reality.

The Shimla region took on considerable political importance as the Indian colonial government decided to take up summer residence there, because of the healthier climate linked to the altitude. The question of transport to the Himalayan foothills, the Delhi region and the Ganges plain then became crucial. The possibility of a rail link was mentioned as early as 1847. The opening of the Grand Hindostan and Tibet Route was however the first major advance in this field. It was operational in this region in 1856.

The first engineering development work was carried out in 1884-85, to establish a steam traction "adhesion line" with a gradient not exceeding 30/1000 (1/33), using the narrow gauge principle. The project was submitted to the government but was not immediately taken up.

Development work was revived by the arrival of the Delhi railway line at Kalka, in 1891. Other shorter layouts and other technical solutions were then considered by the engineers, such as the rack system. Finally a contract was signed between the government and the Ambala-Kalka Railway, for the construction and operation of an adhesion line with a gauge of 2 feet. The final general design project was presented and approved in 1899. It comprised the technical development work, the costing and the rolling stock. The Railway had to meet the cost of construction on its own; only the land was provided by the public authorities.

The work was begun, but at the request of the Army, the initial 2 foot gauge was increased to 2 feet 6 inches. The rails were in laminated steel, and were laid on wooden sleepers and ballast.

Traffic opened to the public on 9 November 1903. But exceptionally heavy snowfall damaged the track on 26 December of the same year, causing a large number of landslides. Difficult operating conditions were thus added to the high cost of initial establishment, and despite the high fares the Railway experienced serious financial difficulties. Its strategic importance led the government to acquire the line on 1st January 1905.

The first steam locomotives were 4-wheeled engines (1900), and these were followed by 6-wheeled (1902) and finally 10-wheeled engines. They were made by Stewart & Co of Glasgow. The locomotive models were derived from those used on the Darjeeling Himalayan Railway. This rolling stock remained in service until 1953 with no major modifications.

The locomotives were then modified by the German company Henschel: increase in water and coal capacities, modification of the grate, modification of the valve gear. The modified steam locomotives began to be scrapped in the 1970s, and the last ones remained in service until 1980. They were replaced by diesel engines from 1952 onwards. One of the steam locomotives initially delivered in 1905 (KC 520) has been restored by KSR, in 2001, in order to re-establish the tradition of steam traction in the mountains, which today has been almost completely forgotten.

The carriages were built by the Railway itself from 1903 onwards. The first were very simple 4-wheeled carriages, light and short (17 feet). In 1910 new carriages were introduced using steel under-frames and bogies, thereby reducing the number of derailments. The KSR initially had 4 travel classes. Furthermore, extremely luxurious saloon cars could be rented. The second car of this type, built in 1912 (RA-2), has been conserved and restored. Subsequent passenger carriages were made lighter and protected against the effects of corrosion by the use of aluminium.

In 1911, petrol-driven Rail Motor Cars were introduced on the line to carry mail. They were made by the Drewery Car Co. Ltd. in London, and were equipped with White & Poppe 17 HP engines. Car no. 12 of this type is preserved in the National Rail Museum, New Delhi. Diesel-electric motor cars were introduced from 1932, with large windows to give panoramic views of the magnificent Himalayan mountain scenery. One of these cars (no. 8) is known as the "Queen of Shivalik". With this type of car, the total journey time was reduced to 4½ hours, which is still the same today. Generally speaking, the KSR has always attempted to improve its rolling stock, both in terms of technical performance and passenger comfort.

Source: Advisory Body Evaluation



Kalka-Simla Railway. A Special train hauled by Steam Locomotive 520 waits to pass a service train at Taradevi. 13th February 2005
Photographer - A.M.Hurrell


The Kalka-Shimla Train Halts At Solan Station

Route

0 km Kalka

6 km Taksal

11 km Gumman

17 km Koti

27 km Sonwara

33 km Dharampur

39 km Kumarhatti

43 km Barog

47 km Solan

53 km Salogra

59 km Kandaghat

65 km Kanoh

73 km Kathleeghat

78 km Shoghi

85 km Taradevi

90 km Totu (Jutogh)

93 km Summer Hill

96 km Shimla


Shivalik Deluxe Express ( Photo by : Md Mudassir Alam)
Shivalik Deluxe Express – An Express Train service with more comfortable chair cars and meal service


Kalka Shimla Express Train ( Photo by : Subh Mohan Singh)
Kalka Shimla Express - An Express Train service with first, second class and unreserved seating.


Himalayan Queen ( Photo taken by : Anup Negi)
Himalayan Queen – A Heritage Train service with chair cars, connecting Mail/Express train and the Kalka Shatabdi from/to Delhi


Rail Motor in Kalka Shimla Railway ( Photo by : Shrivas)
Rail Motor – A railbus originally used to transport upper class travelers, first class seating only, glass roof and possibility to look out to the front. This is a unique rail in which Rail Engine is connected with Bogie (i.e. Engine and Bogy is on same platform). The total passenger capacity of this train is 15 only.
Himalayan Queen – A Heritage Train service with chair cars, connecting Mail/Express train and the Kalka Shatabdi from/to Delhi

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Old March 29th, 2014, 08:39 PM   #6
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Kangra Valley Railway

The Kangra Valley Railway lies in the sub-Himalayan region and covers a distance of 164 km (101.9 mi) from Pathankot, Punjab to Jogindernagar in Himachal Pradesh, India. The Kangra valley railway comes under the Firozpur division of Northern Railway. It is one of two mountain railways that run in Himachal Pradesh, the other being Kalka-Shimla Railway, which has been designated as world heritage site by UNESCO. Both of these currently run at a 2 ft 6 in (762 mm) narrow gauge, although they do not connect to each other. The Kangra Valley Railway is among in the tentative list of UNESCO world heritage sites. Indian Railways has identified Pathankot-Jogindernagar route to be converted into 1,676 mm (5 ft 6 in) Indian gauge and to extend it to Mandi, and eventually to Ladakh via a new Bilaspur-Mandi-Leh Railway

Route
0 km Pathankot Junction

83 km Jawalamukhi Road

94 km Kangra

109 km Nagrota

127 km Palampur

141 km Baijnath Paprola

164 km Joginder Nagar


Baijnath Paprola station
CC GKarunakar


Line towards Jogindernagar
CC GKarunakar


Kangra valley Rail on Gaa Khad Bridge in Jawali
CC Vikasjariyal
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Old March 29th, 2014, 08:46 PM   #7
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Matheran Hill Railway

Matheran Hill Railway is a 2 ft (610 mm) narrow gauge heritage railway in Maharashtra, India. The railways comes under the administration of the Central Railways. The railway covers a distance of 21 km (13.05 mi), over large swathes of forest territory connecting Neral to Matheran in the Western Ghats. UNESCO is considering giving world heritage status to matheran light railway

The Neral-Matheran Light Railway was built between 1901 and 1907 by Abdul Hussein Adamjee Peerbhoy, financed by his father, Sir Adamjee Peerbhoy at the cost of INR16 lakh (US$26,000). Sir Adamjee Peerbhoy visited Matheran often and wanted to build a railway to make it easier to get there. Hussain's plans for the Matheran Hill Railway were formulated in 1900 and construction started in 1904. Consulting engineer was Everard Calthrop of Barsi Light Railway fame. The line was open to traffic by 1907. Originally, the tracks were laid with 30 lb/yd (14.9 kg/m) rails but now has 42 lb/yd (20.8 kg/m) rails. Ruling gradient is 1:20 (5%) with tight curves and speeds are limited to 12 km/h (7.5 mph).

The railway was closed by flood damage during 2005 and was not expected to re-open before April 2007.Contrary to those expectations, the first run on the repaired railway was on 5 March 2007.The line observed its centenary on April 15, 2007.

Train services were suspended during the monsoon season from June to October because of the danger of landslides. During the 2012 monsoon season, CR conducted 10 controllability tests for air-braked coaches, followed trial runs and approval from Commission of Railway Safety. CR ran services for the first time during the monsoon.CR also plans to shorten the period during which services are suspended by suspending services only from July 15 and restarting them on October 1.

In November 2012, CR added a 5-seater luxury family coach (called saloon) to trains operating on the line. The saloons feature cushioned sofas and LCD screens images displaying images captured by CCTV cameras installed outside. Earlier, these saaloons were available only to railway officers inspecting tracks and railway premises.

Route
Neral, Jummapatti, Water Pipe, Aman Lodge railway station, Matheran

image hosted on flickr

TOY TRAIN HEADING TOWARDS MATHERAN
The Neral - Matheran Toy Train gracefully climbs the massive curve, about 2kms from Neral Jn.
CC Arzan Kotval





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Old March 29th, 2014, 08:48 PM   #8
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109-year-old steam engine once again rolls out on Shimla track
IANS | Mar 29, 2014, 07.08 PM IST





SHIMLA: An 109-year-old British-era steam engine on Saturday once again chugged down the Kalka-Shimla heritage track with over 12 passengers, mostly foreigners on board, railway officials said here.

Considered to be an engineering marvel, locomotive KC 520, the only narrow gauge steam engine which dates back to 1905, operated to and fro between Shimla and Kathlighat, commercial inspector (railways) Amar Singh Thakur told IANS.

The one-way 22km-long journey between the two stations, located on the Shimla-Kalka rail line that figures in UNESCO World Heritage site list, takes more than one hour.

The steam engine-hauled train, being handled by the Indian Railways Catering and Tourism Corporation (IRCTC), a wing of the Indian Railways, with two chartered coaches was booked for Rs.96,000, including taxes, he said.

The Indian Railways in February last year rolled out the indigenously built coal-fired steam locomotive for the first time in over six years. This was for the second time since then that it was hired.

Frank, a tourist from the US, said he had specially come here to enjoy the ride on the locomotive.

"I really enjoyed the rhythmic chiming of 'chuff-chuff-choo-choo' of the engine. I really enjoyed the ride in the cool hills coated with Himalayan cedars," he said.

Another tourist Sandy said travelling on a coal-propelled engine was really memorable.

IRCTC officials said under the plan, any company or individual can hire a steam train comprising two to three coaches with a capacity to accommodate up to 40 people between Shimla and Kathlighat at a cost of Rs.80,000 plus 20 percent service tax. Food is provided on board.

The British-era steam engine was recently repaired and restored in Amritsar.

The steam locomotives, which ferried Europeans to and from this hill town, the erstwhile summer capital of British India, were gradually phased out with the launch of diesel engines from 1952 onwards.

The Kalka-Shimla rail track, built by the British, was inaugurated by Lord Curzon, the British viceroy in India, in November 1903.

The ascent on the track begins from 2,100ft (640 metres) above sea level at Kalka in Haryana and crosses Dharampur, Barog, Solan and Kandaghat before it reaches Shimla at 7,000ft.

There are 102 tunnels on the rail line. Initially, there were 103, but tunnel number 46 does not exist any more.

A train takes about three minutes to cross the longest tunnel at Barog (5,000ft). The other big tunnels en route are at Koti (2,276ft), Taradevi (1,615 ft) and tunnel number 103 (1,135ft), which is near Shimla.
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Old March 29th, 2014, 08:55 PM   #9
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http://indianexpress.com/article/cit...an-line-a-hit/
Special saloons in toy trains on Neral-Matheran line a hit
Written by Kalpana Verma | Mumbai | March 25, 2014 1:42 am




Neral-Matheran rail line was built in the early 20th century at a cost of Rs 16 lakh.

The special saloons in toy trains on Neral-Matheran railway has received overwhelming response from tourists, with income from bookings having witnessed a four-fold increase since its introduction on November 22, 2012, say Central Railway officials.

Between April 2012 and February 2013, 45 bookings were made from Neral to Matheran while 56 bookings were made from Matheran to Neral, helping the CR earn Rs 1.18 lakh. Between April 2013 and February 2014, the figure has risen with 236 bookings made from Neral to Matheran and 104 bookings from Matheran to Neral, helping the Railways earn Rs 3.99lakh.

“It has been noticed that tourists like to use toy trains while going from Neral to Matheran, but prefer taking a taxi or even walking while on their way back,” a CR official said.

The saloons were previously used only by railways officers for inspection. However, with a plan to boost sale of tickets on the hill railway, the CR introduced the facility for passengers too.

The saloons have been modified with provisions made for comfortable seating, especially for a small family or group of friends travelling together. A CCTV camera has been attached outside the saloon, which connects to an LCD TV inside to help passengers enjoy the scenic beauty of the hill station easily. For this, a group of five passengers have to pay only Rs 1,175.

At present CR operates six shuttle services along Neral-Matheran as only three locomotives are in working condition. CR operates seven shuttle services between Aman Lodge and Matheran.

The Neral-Matheran railway line was built in the early 20th century at a cost of Rs 16 lakh. The construction started in 1904 and the line was thrown open for traffic in 1907. Sir Adamjee Peerbhoy is credited with financing the railway line and his son Abdul Hussain Adamjee Peerbhoy for planning it.
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Old March 30th, 2014, 05:09 PM   #10
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The Darjeeling Himalayan Railway-Documentary

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The Kalka-Shimla Railway-Documentary

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The Nilgiri Mountain Railway-Documentary

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Old March 30th, 2014, 05:58 PM   #13
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Passengers thrilled as heritage train chugs along Himalayas

A 109-year-old British era steam engine on Saturday once again chugged down the Kalka-Shimla heritage track with over 12 passengers, mostly foreigners, railway officials said here.
Considered an engineering marvel, locomotive KC 520, the only narrow gauge steam engine which dates back to 1905, operated between Shimla and Kathlighat, commercial inspector (Railways) Amar Singh Thakur said.
The one-way 22-km journey between the two stations, located on the Shimla-Kalka rail line that figures in UNESCO World Heritage site list, takes more than one hour.
The steam engine hauled train, being handled by the Indian Railways Catering and Tourism Corporation (IRCTC), a wing of the Indian Railways, with two chartered coaches was booked for Rs.96,000, including taxes, he said.
The Railways in February last rolled out the indigenously built coal-fired steam locomotive for the first time in over six years. This was for the second time since then that it was hired.
Frank, a tourist from the U.S., said he had specially come here to enjoy the ride on the locomotive.
‘Memorable’
“I really enjoyed the rhythmic chiming of ‘chuff-chuff choo-choo’ of the engine. The ride in the cool hills coated with Himalayan cedars was enjoyable,” he said. Another tourist, Sandy, said the travel was “memorable.”
IRCTC officials said under the plan, any company or individual can hire a steam train comprising two to three coaches with a capacity to accommodate up to 40 people between Shimla and Kathlighat at a cost of Rs.80,000 plus 20 per cent service tax. Food is provided on board. The engine was recently repaired and restored in Amritsar.
The Kalka-Shimla rail track was inaugurated by Lord Curzon, the British Viceroy in India, in November 1903.
The ascent on the track begins from 2,100 ft (640 metres) above sea level at Kalka in Haryana and crosses Dharampur, Barog, Solan and Kandaghat before it reaches Shimla at 7,000 ft. There are 102 tunnels on the rail line. Initially, there were 103, but tunnel number 46 does not exist any more.
A train takes about three minutes to cross the longest tunnel at Barog (5,000 ft).
The other big tunnels en route are at Koti (2,276 ft), Taradevi (1,615 ft) and tunnel number 103 (1,135 ft), which is near Shimla. — IANS
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Old March 31st, 2014, 07:34 PM   #14
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Nice thread... I do have few pics from National Railway Museum Delhi. Will post them here.
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Old April 3rd, 2014, 05:57 AM   #15
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http://www.dhrs.org/
Photo from Sushil Dikshit.

The first picture we have received of this historic event when the DTL charter was the very first steam working along the new alignment and on up to Gayabari

Trains can now travel from NJP to Gayabari over the bottom half of the line.






Trains will be able to travel from NJP/Siliguri to Gayabari.
There is still the massive landslip at Pagla Jhora, above Gayabari, to be rebuilt
to allow trains over the full length of the line.

Work on the new temporary railway line just below the Tindharia Workshops.
The replacement of the road will have to wait for the rebuilding of the hillside
to right of the lower picture.
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Old April 6th, 2014, 07:13 AM   #16
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Indian Railways - 'Toy Train' to Shimla





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Old April 6th, 2014, 07:21 AM   #17
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Darjeeling steam Railway

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Old April 10th, 2014, 06:06 PM   #18
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Matheran’s first ever locomotive up for sale, family wants govt to bid
By Rajendra B Aklekar, Mumbai Mirror | Apr 10, 2014, 01.32 AM IST


The family of Sir Adamjee Peerbhoy, who built the Neral-Matheran railway route over a century ago, have said that they want the inaugural engine, which is in the UK, back.




The present-day generation of Sir Adamjee Peerbhoy, who built the Neral-Matheran railway route over a century ago, want the Indian Railways and the government to make an effort to bring back an original locomotive that operated on the heritage Matheran Light Railway.
The steam locomotive - one of the original four - has been in the UK for the past 30 years, and has now been put up for sale by the Railworld Museum at Peterborough, England.
While no reserve price has been set for the loco, the sale will be executed via informal tenders, the deadline for submission of which is June 30. Railworld Museum says the sale will be to a new owner who has the resources and the commitment to restore and operate the Berlin-built locomotive and provide access to the public. The sale is being managed on behalf of the trustees by The International Railway Preservation Society.
Sources said there were four novel steam locomotives that the Peerbhoy family had bought specially for the mountainous stretch from Messrs Orienstein & Koppel, Germany. These were specifically built for the narrow curves and steep climbs of the Matheran hills. Of the original four engines — MLR 738 is stationed at Neral and is still used occasionally on the route for special tours, MLR 739 is at National Railway Museum in New Delhi, MLR 741 stands outside Matheran station, while MLR 740 is the one in UK.
Built in 1907, the 19.97-km stretch between Neral and Matheran in Raigad district of Maharashtra has been included by UNESCO in its tentative heritage list among mountain railways of India.
"The Neral-Matheran railway is our family's creation and we would like the government to honour Sir Adamjee Peerbhoy by getting this original locomotive back to India," said Ali Akbar Adamjee Peerbhoy, a great-grandson of the Peerbhoy family, who shuttle between Matheran and Clare Road at Byculla where they live.
Comprising two sisters, Fatima and Zainab, and three sons, Husain, Ali Akbar and Ali Asgar, the family own the Khatija Resorts at Matheran, run a charity in Saurashtra, and a school near Neral.
They also resent the attitude of the authorities towards the quaint railway and its founder. "Even the locomotive that stands outside Matheran station today does not bear the Peerbhoy name. The Railways should at least install an adequate plaque at the site," Ali Akbar added.
When Mirror contacted Indian Railways Executive Director (Heritage) Manu Goel, he said he was yet to hear about the upcoming sale, and would have to inquire about it before commenting.
Meanwhile, Phil Marshall of the International Railway Preservation Society, said, The locomotive is currently dismantled and in secure storage following a comprehensive condition survey by a third party. The boiler report and basic mechanical assessment are available to interested parties, and inspections of the locomotive can be arranged."
Asked about the expected price, Marshall said, "As the sale evoked considerable interest, we decided not to set a reserve price. We want to ensure that the loco is restored and that the public will have access to it. As such, we will also take into consideration the future uses of the loco."
Echoing the Peerbhoy family's sentiments is Prof Dr Balkrishna Bhosale of the sociology department of Mumbai University, who is writing a book on the history of Matheran and its railway. "This is the chance.... we should buy the locomotive and restore it. It's a matter of shame that the locomotive is outside India. The Indian Railways must make a bid for it," Prof Bhosale said.
Built in 1907, the locos were very successful and the fleet of four worked the line exclusively until the introduction of diesel engines in 1965. Thereafter, the steam locomotives continued in service for some time, until they were withdrawn in 1982.
The MLR 740 was donated to Britain by the Government of India in 1985 in recognition of services towards the establishment of India's National Railway Museum. The engine was acquired by the Amberley Chalk Pits Museum and arrived in UK on November 28, 1986. It was donated to Railworld Museum, Peterborough, in 1991.
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Old April 16th, 2014, 05:21 PM   #19
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http://www.railnews.co.in/railways-n...er-locomotive/
Railways not keen on getting back Matheran’s first ever Locomotive



08-01मुंबई Mumbai: The Indian Railways on Monday said they are not interested in buying one of the first four original steam locomotives of the heritage Matheran Light Railway (MLR) which have been put up on sale by the Railworld Museum at Peterborough, UK. The MLR 740 has been in the museum for the past thirty years.

On April 10, it was reported that the present-day generation of Sir Adamjee Peerbhoy, who built the Neral-Matheran railway route over a century ago, wanted the railways and the government to bring back an original locomotive that operated on the MLR.

“We will not be interested in buying the engine as we already several of a similar type here,” Subodh Jain, Railway Board Member (Engineering), told.

The present-day generation of the Peerbhoy family was not happy with the railways’ decision. “First of all, the locomotive should not have gone out of India. But now that it is up for sale, it needs to be brought back by the railways,” said Ali Akbar Adamjee Peerbhoy, the second great grandson of Sir Adamjee Peerbhoy.

“The locos had been bought by the Peerbhoy family, how could the Indian Railways give it out to another country? If I remember correctly, the engine had been put up on display outside CST, then one day it was removed,” Ali Akbar added.

The MLR 740 was donated to Britain by the Indian government in 1985 in recognition of services towards the establishment of India’s National Railway Museum. The engine was acquired by the Amberley Chalk Pits Museum and arrived in UK on November 28, 1986. It was donated to Railworld Museum in 1991.

Sources said the four novel steam locomotives had been bought specially for the mountainous stretch from Messrs. Orienstein & Koppel, Germany, in 1907. They were made especially for the narrow curves and steep climbs of the Matheran hills.

Of the original four engines – MLR 738, MLR 739, MLR 740, MLR 741 — that survive today, MLR 740 has been in the UK for the last three decades.

The Railworld Museum said that the locomotive will be sold to someone with the resources and commitment to restore and operate the Berlin-built locomotive with access to the public.

The sale is being managed on behalf of the trustees by The International Railway Preservation Society (IRPS).
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Old April 18th, 2014, 04:59 AM   #20
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