daily menu » rate the banner | guess the city | one on oneforums map | privacy policy | DMCA | news magazine | posting guidelines

Go Back   SkyscraperCity > Infrastructure and Mobility Forums > Highways & Autobahns

Highways & Autobahns All about automobility



Global Announcement

As a general reminder, please respect others and respect copyrights. Go here to familiarize yourself with our posting policy.


Reply

 
Thread Tools
Old August 12th, 2015, 12:28 PM   #101
Tenjac
Registered User
 
Join Date: Jul 2014
Posts: 122
Likes (Received): 39

Quote:
Originally Posted by italystf View Post
I've read that in Cuba restaurant and bar waiters who get tips in hard currency from foreign tourists are much richer than a doctor paid by the state.
It's probably like it was in the former Eastern Bloc. My father visited Czechoslovakia in 1985 and said that everyone wanted USDs or Deutsche Marks as tips.
That is, of course, true. But the whole thing is by far more complex then that. And it is applicable if you compare two capitalist countries too.

For example, I am working for 800 €/month in Croatia. In Germany, I would, for the same job, got much more then that (someone from Germany can tell how much). In Switzerland or Norway even more. In Cuba, I would get around 70 US$ officially for 40 hours per week, unofficialy for 20 hours per week (first hand information; majority of Cubans are far more lazy then you can even imagine).

I am assistant professor at university (though, I am underpaid because of restrictions imposed by the government).

But if I go to the store in Cuba, 1 $ will buy the same amount of goods as 20 € in Croatia. I have to pay 500 € for housing and far more in the store. I have barely managed to buy myself a new car (C3, nothing special) but that's only beacuse i am still childless and my wife is also employed. And, it would be almost impossible for me to loose the job in Cuba while in Croatia I have 5 years contract which will be extended only if I accomplish some defined tasks.

Level of corruption in Croatia is high. Political freedoms are not very high. You can be fined for displaying symbols and slogans against liberal democracy and capitalism (the same what will happen to you in Cuba if you speak against the revolution) - there is expression in Croatia which would describe this as "same shit, different package" - and you most probably will not get a job if you are syndicalist in private company.

Roads are OK but because of 0,06 €/km of tolls I can barely afford myself driving on highways. I use them but very, very rarely.

Stores are full of goods which I cannot buy and majority of people has lower wage then me.

So...
Tenjac no está en línea   Reply With Quote

Sponsored Links
Old August 12th, 2015, 12:50 PM   #102
keber
Moderator
 
Join Date: Nov 2006
Location: Slovenia
Posts: 9,878
Likes (Received): 1364

Quote:
Originally Posted by Tenjac View Post
But if I go to the store in Cuba, 1 $ will buy the same amount of goods as 20 € in Croatia.
Apparently you haven't been on Cuba yet. Things are generally somehow cheaper in stores, but not much cheaper than elsewhere. 1 $ will buy you maybe one can of Coca cola. Basic things like rice, flour, oil, sugar, cigarettes etc. is given to Cubans only on basis of monthly coupons in special stores.
I've been on Cuba 14 years ago and as I've heard from others, not much has changes since (see my 7 year old post on first page)
I remember when you drive on motorways it feels like US Interstates from 1940ies (concrete, no dashed lines, no guardrails, almost no signalisation), albeit with traffic of Alaska in more remote parts.
__________________

El Tiburon liked this post
keber no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old August 12th, 2015, 02:02 PM   #103
italystf
Registered User
 
Join Date: Aug 2011
Posts: 6,456
Likes (Received): 2185

Quote:
Originally Posted by Tenjac View Post
Political freedoms are not very high. You can be fined for displaying symbols and slogans against liberal democracy and capitalism (the same what will happen to you in Cuba if you speak against the revolution) - there is expression in Croatia which would describe this as "same shit, different package"
Apology of nazi-fascism and hate speech (i.e. racist speech) are illegal virtually everywhere in Europe.
Some former communist countries also banned the apology of communism.
So, it's not a problem just of Croatia, you probably would be fined for that even in Switzerland or Germany.
If you were Cuban you wouldn't be writing there, as internet is censored in Cuba.
__________________
“The transponder’s personalised signal would be picked up when the car passed through an intersection, and then relayed to a central computer which would calculate the charge according to the intersection and the time of day and add it to the car’s bill” - Nobel Economics Prize winner William Vickrey, proposing a system of electronic tolling for the Washington metropolitan area, 1959
In real life, electronic toll collection was first introduced in Bergen, Norway in 1986, and well into the 21th century many countries still struggle to implement it.

El Tiburon liked this post
italystf está en línea ahora   Reply With Quote
Old August 13th, 2015, 08:29 AM   #104
El Tiburon
Registered User
 
Join Date: Mar 2010
Posts: 738
Likes (Received): 314

Quote:
Originally Posted by Tenjac View Post
While they, indeed, got only 20 CUC = USD per month, the state subvensions provided to them by using CUP make the prices to be only 4 % of normal. Cars are, of course, an exception. Together with free education and health care, their living standard is effectively equal to that in Romania.
The state "subventions" were always meager at best and were food rationing system used a social control mechanism based on the need to eat. Now, they are almost non-existing, with the monthly ration lasting less than a week and forcing people to "invent" to be able to subsist and buy some basic items in CUC (dollars) at very inflated at the dollarized stores belonging to the military and run by dicitator Raul Castro's son-in-law.

There is nothing free in Cuba. That's a propaganda myth used by the Castro diciatorship to justify its humans rights violations and its absolute and never-ending power. Cubans are charged foe eduction and health care not only through the miserable salaries they recieve but through unpaid work that is "voluntory" (a little bit voluntary and a whole lot mandatory), "red sundays", "productive work" and "social service". Healthcare professionals are rented out to other countries and the dictatorship keeps from 75% to 90% of their salries. And those foreign enterprises that do buisiness in Cuba muist hire and pay for employess through state "labor agencies" using a predatory formula that results in the satte keeping 92 cents of every dollar that the foreign business pays in salry for the Cuban worker.

The helathcare system for Cubans is atrocious. The hospitals are run down, they have no equipment or medicine and there are not enough doctors because most are in other countries doing quasi-slave labor that nets huge profits to the Castros (in Brazil alone, they net $34 million a month in salaries that they take fronm the doctors). By contrast, the helathcare system for foreigners that pay in dollars or euros is much better than the one for Cubans, with hotel-like hospitals, medicines, equipment and good doctors.

Quote:
President Castro also said that there will be a move to eliminate CUP and that all wages denominated in CUP will be payed in CUC in the same amount. That will bring Cuban wages to the level of 500 US$ per month without subvensions. Still, education and health care will remain free, and the cost of living will be very low.
Neither Fidel Castro nor his brother Raul who inherited power from Fidel by dynastic succession are presidents of Cuba because they have never been elected to the position. They are, plain and simple, dictators. the last demoocratically elected president of Cuba was Carlos Prios Socarras in 1948. Weeks before the 1952 election, Batista usurped power with a coup d'etat and since 1952 Cuba has had 3 dictators. The "lections" staged regularly in Cuba are no such thing because there is only one party (the communist party) and the people only get to elect the local delegate (something lie a neighborhoord chief) and don't get to vote for any higher position.

The story of the reunification of currency is sort of like Cubans call "el cuento de la buena pipa" (the story of the good pipe) that goes in circles without end. In 1958, Cuba had some of the highest salaries in the world which the castro diciatorshop managed to sink to the lowest level. Now, the Cuban peso, (CUP) which used to be stronger than the US dollar is worth 4 USD cents and the new salaries of $500 CUC being promised but never delivered will be ridiculous compared to the pre-1959 salaries Cubans enjoyed before the Castros destroyed Cuba and its economy.

Interestingly, the Castro family and its closest associates seem to have no limits on their income. Last month, for example, Antonio Castro Soto del Valle, who is Fidel Castro's son vacationes in the Mediterranean Sea in a 160-foot (50-meter) yacht on which he arrived to to Bodrun, Turkey from the Greek Islaes. In Bodrun, he stayed in a luxury resort with his entourage and spent in lodging alone 30 thousand euros (6 suites at 1,000 euros a night for 5 nights) which is the equivalent of 160 years of work for an average Cuban. While there, his bodyguards assaulted and insulted reporters and photographers that dared to document his rich-and-famous lifestyle, specially when his father and uncle are always forcing the Cuban people to make more "sacrifices for the revolution". Likewise, dictator's Raul Castro's granddaughter was photographed in the United States carrying her $800-dollar Louis Vuitton purse which is the equivalent of three-and-a-half years of work for an average Cuban. It seems like in the Castros' "egalitarian" Animal Farm, like George Orwell said, some animals are more equal than others.

Last edited by El Tiburon; August 13th, 2015 at 08:45 AM.
El Tiburon no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old August 13th, 2015, 08:53 AM   #105
El Tiburon
Registered User
 
Join Date: Mar 2010
Posts: 738
Likes (Received): 314

Quote:
Originally Posted by italystf View Post
I've read that in Cuba restaurant and bar waiters who get tips in hard currency from foreign tourists are much richer than a doctor paid by the state.
It's probably like it was in the former Eastern Bloc. My father visited Czechoslovakia in 1985 and said that everyone wanted USDs or Deutsche Marks as tips.
That is true. The maximum salary for a doctor in Cuba who is either a second-degree specialsit or has more than one specialist is $1500 Cuban pesos ($60 dollars a month).

Lots of doctors and other professionals try to get into the tourism industry for that reason. Since Cubans cannot directly contract with foreign employers and must go through a state labor agency, there is a corruption avenue (among many in Cuba) to sell jobs in the tourist sector to the highest bidder. I personally knew a doctor who dreamed of becoming a bellhop at a tourist hotel in order to earn hard-currency tips carrying in tourists' luggage.
El Tiburon no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old August 13th, 2015, 08:58 AM   #106
El Tiburon
Registered User
 
Join Date: Mar 2010
Posts: 738
Likes (Received): 314

Quote:
Originally Posted by italystf View Post
I wouldn't be surprised if 6 or 8-lanes highways in Cuba had been built primarily to serve for tanks or planes in case of war.
Wen they began building the "ocho-vias" (8-lane) highway in the 1970's it was with the purpose of using it as runways. Thus, the highway has no dividers. It is a ribbon of concrente 8-lanes wide with no lane markings in most places and you made your own lane.
El Tiburon no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old August 13th, 2015, 08:59 AM   #107
El Tiburon
Registered User
 
Join Date: Mar 2010
Posts: 738
Likes (Received): 314

Quote:
Originally Posted by Falusi View Post
BTW I took some pictures of that motorway, and other roads in January, I can upload them if you want.
Please do.
El Tiburon no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old August 13th, 2015, 09:16 AM   #108
El Tiburon
Registered User
 
Join Date: Mar 2010
Posts: 738
Likes (Received): 314

Quote:
Originally Posted by Falusi View Post
Our tourist guide in Cuba said, that indeed the original goal of the Autopista Nacional was to connect the two big cities Havanna and Santiago de Cuba to respond faster in case of an attack from USA. But the construction was very expensive and on the Santiago de Cuba side was really slow, so the works had been stopped. Of course they couldn't say that, so they figured out a story, that this motorway serves as a very good runway to possible invading aircrafts, and that's why they had to stop constructing it further.
Fidel Castro did all kinds of absurdi and downright insane things to keep people in a siege mentality of "yankee attack" in order to rally nationalistic support using the tried-and-true playbook of fascist and communist dictators.

In addition to the 8-lane runway, which was to be used by Castro's MiG fighter-bombers, he had conscripted young men in the obligatory military service, dig and blast tunnles and storage caves in the Havana-Matanzas heights along the northern shore of those provinces where weapons, tanks, planes, missiles and explosives were stored and where radar units and anti-aircraft missile batteries were set up. In Havana, the tunnels that began to be excavated for the Havana Metro (subway) were transforemed into the "tunnels of the war of all the people", a North Korea-sounding name given by
Fidel Castro to his psychotic outburst. The Cubans were kept on edege, digging tunnels and shelters and doing drills to prepare for the "yankee attack" that would never come. Now, one of those tunnels is used to grow mushrooms for export but you can see the consequeinces of the mindless and reckless blasting in buildings that suffered fatal structural damages a s a result, the most prominet being the Pedro Borras Children's Hospital in G and 29 streets, a beautiful Art Deco hospital built in the 1930's when Cuba still had a first-class health care system.
El Tiburon no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old August 13th, 2015, 09:43 AM   #109
El Tiburon
Registered User
 
Join Date: Mar 2010
Posts: 738
Likes (Received): 314

Quote:
Originally Posted by Tenjac View Post
In Cuba, I would get around 70 US$ officially for 40 hours per week, unofficialy for 20 hours per week (first hand information; majority of Cubans are far more lazy then you can even imagine).
If you make $70 USD ($1,750 CUP) in Cuba you have a tremendous salary higher than the highest salary that doctors get.

Cubans have become incredibly lazy because they don't see any fruits form their labor for the state. While the state pretends to pay them, the Cubans pretend to work. Cubans prefer to "invent" which is diverting resources from the state, that is stealing anything they can get away with from governemnt enterprises or warehouses. When it comes to "inventios" the creativity of Cubans has no limits.

Quote:
But if I go to the store in Cuba, 1 $ will buy the same amount of goods as 20 € in Croatia.
That might be in a government "bodega" which are usually bare and have little, if any, food available through the ratining booklet. If you go to the dollarized stores, you will have to pay very inflated prices higher that you would pay for the same producti in American supermarkets.

Quote:
I have to pay 500 € for housing and far more in the store.
In Castro's Cuba, there is a major housing crisis. Several generations live in the same housing unit, often in ruinous buildins that collapse in the rain because they have recieved no maintenance or even a coat of paint since 1958. There is a lot of overcrowding, rains often bring building collapses and unjust evictions, confiscations and destructions of self-built housing are very common.

Quote:
And, it would be almost impossible for me to loose the job in Cuba while in Croatia I have 5 years contract which will be extended only if I accomplish some defined tasks.
Jobs in Cuba are very easy to lose nowadays, specially for political reasons. In the 1960's, everyone who applied to leave in the Freedom Flights was automatically terminated from their jobs. In the 1980's, they were expelled from their jobs through so-called "acts of repudiation", an evil act copied by Fidel castro form Hitler where government-controlled mobs beat people up and destroy their property while hurling rocks, eggs and insults at them.

Now, nobody wants to work for the State in Cuba except for those "mayimbes" and members of the nomenklatura with all sorts of privileges. The desirability of a job in Cuba is not measured in salry and benefits but in the opportunities it offers to divert state resources.

Quote:
Level of corruption in Croatia is high. Political freedoms are not very high. You can be fined for displaying symbols and slogans against liberal democracy and capitalism (the same what will happen to you in Cuba if you speak against the revolution)
Level of corruption in Cuba is extremely high and is a way of life for most everybody.. Political freedoms do not exist. You can be arrested, beat-up, fined, jailed and even killed for expressing opinions different to the official orthodoxy of the Castro dictatorship or doing political activities like marches or petitions thay are strictly prohibited there.
El Tiburon no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old August 13th, 2015, 08:47 PM   #110
Corvinus
License plate spotter
 
Join Date: Dec 2010
Location: H / D / CH
Posts: 1,058
Likes (Received): 1190

Sounds really like the Eastern bloc during Cold War Europe. No incentives to perform - resulting in poor labor quality and a generally decaying infrastructure.

BTW we could add the [C] to the thread title, even if very few (if any at all) Cuban vehicles ever needed a decal. Are there any testimonies of Cuban reg. vehicles driving around in a foreign country? (or vice versa?)
Corvinus no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old August 14th, 2015, 12:19 AM   #111
Kanadzie
Registered User
 
Kanadzie's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2014
Posts: 2,374
Likes (Received): 747

LOL how does a tiny impoverished dump like Cuba get the full C and a G7 democracy like Canada gets only CDN
__________________
100 coups de fouet, si vous n'ętes pas morts de rire !
Kanadzie no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old August 14th, 2015, 12:50 AM   #112
italystf
Registered User
 
Join Date: Aug 2011
Posts: 6,456
Likes (Received): 2185

@El Tiburon: are you a Cuban political refugee?
You seem to know very well the situation of that country and you gave a very sad picture of it, but probably very realistic, much more realistic than happy holiday reports.
Interesting report.
__________________
“The transponder’s personalised signal would be picked up when the car passed through an intersection, and then relayed to a central computer which would calculate the charge according to the intersection and the time of day and add it to the car’s bill” - Nobel Economics Prize winner William Vickrey, proposing a system of electronic tolling for the Washington metropolitan area, 1959
In real life, electronic toll collection was first introduced in Bergen, Norway in 1986, and well into the 21th century many countries still struggle to implement it.

El Tiburon liked this post
italystf está en línea ahora   Reply With Quote
Old August 14th, 2015, 07:19 AM   #113
El Tiburon
Registered User
 
Join Date: Mar 2010
Posts: 738
Likes (Received): 314

Quote:
Originally Posted by italystf View Post
@El Tiburon: are you a Cuban political refugee?
You seem to know very well the situation of that country and you gave a very sad picture of it, but probably very realistic, much more realistic than happy holiday reports.
Interesting report.
Yes. I was born and raised in Cuba during the Castro dictatorship and came to the United States after high school.
El Tiburon no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old August 14th, 2015, 07:22 AM   #114
El Tiburon
Registered User
 
Join Date: Mar 2010
Posts: 738
Likes (Received): 314

Quote:
Originally Posted by Corvinus View Post
Are there any testimonies of Cuban reg. vehicles driving around in a foreign country? (or vice versa?)
Not that I know...
El Tiburon no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old August 14th, 2015, 01:59 PM   #115
ChrisZwolle
Road user
 
ChrisZwolle's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2006
Location: Zwolle
Posts: 43,597
Likes (Received): 19389

Quote:
Originally Posted by Kanadzie View Post
LOL how does a tiny impoverished dump like Cuba get the full C and a G7 democracy like Canada gets only CDN
The allocation of codes is a bit weird and in some cases outdated.

For example, Burundi has the code RU, which stands for Ruanda-Urundi which existed until 1962 as a Belgian colony. BH = Belize, known as British Honduras at that time. Benin's code is DY, which stands for Dahomey, which was the name of that country until 1975.
ChrisZwolle está en línea ahora   Reply With Quote
Old August 26th, 2015, 12:55 AM   #116
italystf
Registered User
 
Join Date: Aug 2011
Posts: 6,456
Likes (Received): 2185

A googled picture of the 8-lanes motorway near L'Havana.



Motorway rest area

__________________
“The transponder’s personalised signal would be picked up when the car passed through an intersection, and then relayed to a central computer which would calculate the charge according to the intersection and the time of day and add it to the car’s bill” - Nobel Economics Prize winner William Vickrey, proposing a system of electronic tolling for the Washington metropolitan area, 1959
In real life, electronic toll collection was first introduced in Bergen, Norway in 1986, and well into the 21th century many countries still struggle to implement it.

Blackraven, Kozhedub, Alpin, Luki_SL liked this post
italystf está en línea ahora   Reply With Quote
Old September 25th, 2015, 09:43 PM   #117
Corvinus
License plate spotter
 
Join Date: Dec 2010
Location: H / D / CH
Posts: 1,058
Likes (Received): 1190

Quote:
Originally Posted by El Tiburon View Post
Quote:
Are there any testimonies of Cuban reg. vehicles driving around in a foreign country? (or vice versa?)
Not that I know...
I've found one



(Photo src: nacion.com)
__________________

verreme, Mr. Pollo liked this post
Corvinus no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old November 24th, 2016, 11:53 AM   #118
Benyo
Registered User
 
Join Date: Oct 2014
Posts: 66
Likes (Received): 84

Driving over 50km causeway to Cayo Santa Maria

__________________

Corvinus liked this post
Benyo no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old November 27th, 2016, 10:59 AM   #119
Losbp
Registered User
 
Losbp's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2012
Location: Breda (NL) - Jakarta (RI)
Posts: 4,954
Likes (Received): 5444

A nice drive from Jose Marti Airport to the city

__________________
Watch and subscribe!
LTV Indonesia Driving and Public Transportation Series

Transport for Jakarta - FDTJ
Drove in RI AUS NL L B F D CZ A

Benyo liked this post
Losbp no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old December 18th, 2016, 07:48 PM   #120
Benyo
Registered User
 
Join Date: Oct 2014
Posts: 66
Likes (Received): 84

Timelapse Driving in Cuba - From Playa Larga to Santa Clara

__________________

Luki_SL liked this post
Benyo no está en línea   Reply With Quote


Reply

Thread Tools

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Related topics on SkyscraperCity


All times are GMT +2. The time now is 04:17 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.11 Beta 4
Copyright ©2000 - 2018, vBulletin Solutions Inc.
Feedback Buttons provided by Advanced Post Thanks / Like (Pro) - vBulletin Mods & Addons Copyright © 2018 DragonByte Technologies Ltd.

vBulletin Optimisation provided by vB Optimise (Pro) - vBulletin Mods & Addons Copyright © 2018 DragonByte Technologies Ltd.

SkyscraperCity ☆ In Urbanity We trust ☆ about us | privacy policy | DMCA policy

tech management by Sysprosium