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Old February 21st, 2010, 11:42 PM   #81
Botswana
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I'm so glad that they have rebuilt at least some of the city. The architecture is absolutely gorgeous. It's really great that they rebuilt the Frauenkirche, because Dresden was not the same without it.
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Old February 23rd, 2010, 12:36 PM   #83
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I was there in 2004 and I can tell you that this is an increadable city.It was one of the most beautiful cities comparable with Paris or Venice.A woman told me that she have seen a column of black smoke coming from Dresden back in 1945 and she was in Oderan about 70 km away...
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Old February 25th, 2010, 11:11 AM   #85
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It's a shame that the Baroque Brühlsche Palais was demolished in 1900 (although it would've been destroyed in the war anyway, I guess):


http://de.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?...20090803124423


http://de.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?...20090803124644


http://de.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?...20090803125055
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Old February 25th, 2010, 01:53 PM   #86
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Wow - the plasterwork in that first pic of the Brühlsche Palais is really exquisite. A terrible loss.

I don't want to hijack the thread, but this seems as good a place as any to ask: what do people mean when they refer to a reconstruction as being done "cheaply"? I've heard it said of the Warsaw Old Town, old towns in the Baltics and Croatia, etc. Are inauthentic materials used? The work is slipshod? The interiors are modern? If the last is the case, then most of the recent reconstructions in Dresden, as well as the Berlin Schloss, would also be guilty.
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Old February 25th, 2010, 03:29 PM   #87
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Quote:
Originally Posted by catoneinutica View Post
Wow - the plasterwork in that first pic of the Brühlsche Palais is really exquisite. A terrible loss.

I don't want to hijack the thread, but this seems as good a place as any to ask: what do people mean when they refer to a reconstruction as being done "cheaply"? I've heard it said of the Warsaw Old Town, old towns in the Baltics and Croatia, etc. Are inauthentic materials used? The work is slipshod? The interiors are modern? If the last is the case, then most of the recent reconstructions in Dresden, as well as the Berlin Schloss, would also be guilty.
Hi Caton. Not sure about anyone else, but when I think of reconstruction being done on the cheap then I'm really thinking of modern materials being used either behind the facade or within the facade itself. Yes, the Neumarkt is a good example of this. I can't pretend not to be disappointed that the Neumarkt facades are just stuck onto the front of buildings that have been built using totally modern techniques and materials. I don't think any of the Neumarkt buildings have been constructed totally from original materials or using original techniques e.g. are the red roof tiles manufactured using the 18th century methods or are they just mass-produced out of a modern factory. The problem is that no country or business can now afford to reconstruct these places using original techniques because of the cost in employing so many craftsmen using skills which are, these days, very rare. There are some exceptions but not many that I can think of (although I think a lot of authentic techniques were used in the reconstruction of Hildesheim's Knochenhauer-Amtshaus). It's what annoys me so much about the wanton demolition of such things as the Berlin stadtschloss. Once these things are gone then they really are gone forever. I read somewhere that there aren't enough stonemasons in Europe to recreate the stadtschloss exactly as it was.

I think Warsaw's old town reconstruction is a great success in terms of the authenticity of the age of the materials. The problem there as I understand it is that other towns and cities in Poland were plundered in order to provide those materials.

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Old February 25th, 2010, 09:38 PM   #88
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Quote:
Originally Posted by catoneinutica View Post
Wow - the plasterwork in that first pic of the Brühlsche Palais is really exquisite. A terrible loss.

I don't want to hijack the thread, but this seems as good a place as any to ask: what do people mean when they refer to a reconstruction as being done "cheaply"? I've heard it said of the Warsaw Old Town, old towns in the Baltics and Croatia, etc. Are inauthentic materials used? The work is slipshod? The interiors are modern? If the last is the case, then most of the recent reconstructions in Dresden, as well as the Berlin Schloss, would also be guilty.
Excuse me for another slight diversion, as an architectural historian and city planner and of course to some extent a biased Pole, the reconstruction of Warsaw's OLd Town was not done cheaply. Ancient crafts were revived to rebuild it. Even ancient kilns and ways of making bricks, glass, ceramics etc were revived. For this reason and the impressive efforts at reconstructing an urban ensemble of different architectural periods, it was put on the UNESCO. Some of the recent replacement parts such as plastic windows are certainly cheap, but are now banned by the conservator. Yes, bricks and materials from other POlish cities were used to rebuild Warsaw to some extent given the catastrophic level of detsruction suffered by Warsaw unequalled by any other Polish city.

Last edited by Urbanista1; February 25th, 2010 at 09:45 PM.
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Old February 25th, 2010, 11:22 PM   #89
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Originally Posted by Urbanista1 View Post
Ancient crafts were revived to rebuild it. Even ancient kilns and ways of making bricks, glass, ceramics etc were revived. For this reason and the impressive efforts at reconstructing an urban ensemble of different architectural periods, it was put on the UNESCO.
The care and attention to detail shows too. Something along these lines should've been done at Dresden's Neumarkt but unfortunately the cost must've made it prohibitively expensive (not that I'm complaining. The reconstructed parts of the Neumarkt are more than I hoped would ever happen!).
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Old February 26th, 2010, 04:08 AM   #90
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Urbanista1 View Post
Excuse me for another slight diversion, as an architectural historian and city planner and of course to some extent a biased Pole, the reconstruction of Warsaw's OLd Town was not done cheaply. Ancient crafts were revived to rebuild it. Even ancient kilns and ways of making bricks, glass, ceramics etc were revived. For this reason and the impressive efforts at reconstructing an urban ensemble of different architectural periods, it was put on the UNESCO. Some of the recent replacement parts such as plastic windows are certainly cheap, but are now banned by the conservator. Yes, bricks and materials from other POlish cities were used to rebuild Warsaw to some extent given the catastrophic level of detsruction suffered by Warsaw unequalled by any other Polish city.
Urbanista, mea culpa for my using my words carelessly! I read somewhere long ago that the Warsaw Old Town was rebuilt "cheaply." Certainly that wasn't my impression when we visited the city. And it's truly a marvelous thing indeed how the Poles are rebuilding so many architectural treasures, even those built by the marauding Prussians. It's a tragedy for lovers of historical architecture that Koenigsberg didn't end up in Poland after the war!

Last edited by catoneinutica; February 26th, 2010 at 11:22 AM.
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Old February 26th, 2010, 10:32 AM   #91
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Hi
Brühl Palace and Saxon Palace in Warsaw
http://www.warszawa1939.pl/index.php...ac_bruhla&r3=0
http://www.warszawa1939.pl/index.php...lac_saski&r3=0
there are plans to rebuild it but no one knows when it will be
I recommend this page if anyone wants to know how prewar warsaw looked
http://www.warszawa1939.pl/index_fotoplany.php
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Old March 3rd, 2010, 06:40 AM   #94
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NICE!!!
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Old March 4th, 2010, 01:13 AM   #96
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image hosted on flickr


This church let me think about the Westerkerk in Amsterdam.

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Old March 10th, 2010, 10:29 PM   #98
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I love Dresden! It's such an amazing and interesting city!

P.S. Why is the Church of the Cross so stark and bare? Are they planning on rebuilding the interior anytime soon?
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Old March 11th, 2010, 04:25 PM   #99
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Quote:
Why is the Church of the Cross so stark and bare?
In 1945 burnt out the Church of the Cross completely. The reconstruction began in 1950.

Quote:
Are they planning on rebuilding the interior anytime soon?
Unfortunately
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Old March 11th, 2010, 06:49 PM   #100
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Dr

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