daily menu » rate the banner | guess the city | one on oneforums map | privacy policy | DMCA | news magazine | posting guidelines

Go Back   SkyscraperCity > Infrastructure and Mobility Forums > Airports and Aviation

Airports and Aviation » Airports | Photos and Videos



Global Announcement

As a general reminder, please respect others and respect copyrights. Go here to familiarize yourself with our posting policy.


Reply

 
Thread Tools
Old September 23rd, 2008, 01:23 PM   #161
Magellan
Registered User
 
Magellan's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2008
Location: London
Posts: 335
Likes (Received): 0

Quote:
Originally Posted by hkskyline View Post
DEALTALK-Russian move on Austrian a boon for Lufthansa

VIENNA, Sept 18 (Reuters) - Germany's Lufthansa appears to be the preferred and most natural buyer of Austrian Airlines -- but not the one that will pay most or is the likeliest to accommodate wider Austrian interests.

A possible solution to that dilemma for the Austrian government has emerged in the form of Russia's S7 -- if Austria is ready to take the political risk involved.

Austrian government holding agency OeIAG has whittled away unworthy bidders for its 42-percent controlling stake in loss-making Austrian over the past month to draw up a shortlist of three possible buyers this week: Lufthansa, S7 and Air France-KLM .

The trio is now delving into Austrian's books to come up with binding offers by Oct. 21.

Bankers and advisers involved in the deal say OeIAG and Austria's finance ministry have made clear in informal talks that they believe Lufthansa is the only serious contender. OeIAG denies it has a preference for the German carrier.

On top of its long-standing relationship with Austrian -- the two share codes and have a lucrative joint venture that operates flights between the two countries -- Lufthansa appears like a safe haven in a time of turmoil in the airline industry.

The prospect of a smooth handover to a culturally compatible buyer outweighs concerns Lufthansa may sideline Vienna Airport and re-route flights to its Frankfurt and Munich hubs, and may cut costs aggressively.

But those bankers and advisers also say that Austria's courtship is one-sided.

Lufthansa, which agreed to buy Brussels Airlines last week and which sources say is more keen on Alitalia or SAS than on Austrian, is trying hard not to appear overly excited by the prospect of an Austrian buy.

"Their message is, 'Don't take us for granted'," says one banker who is looking at the deal but does not have a mandate.

TWO BIRDS WITH ONE STONE

A key reason is that Lufthansa has the least to gain, another banker looking at the deal says.

"Lufthansa is already today realising maybe 80 percent of the possible benefits through its close cooperation (with Austrian) in the Star Alliance," says this banker who also does not have a mandate.

Lufthansa's main interest in the sale is to make sure Air France does not win the bid and moves Austrian into rival Air France-led alliance Skyteam, those bankers and airline analysts say.

Thus a sale of Austrian to S7, Russia's biggest domestic airline that is seeking to expand abroad and is not part of an airline alliance yet, would catch two birds with one stone from Lufthansa's point of view.

If the deal would be followed by S7 joining Lufthansa's Star Alliance and preserve the German-Austrian joint venture, Lufthansa could keep most of its benefits from its cooperation without exposing itself to a messy restructuring and a deterioration of its balance sheet with indebted Austrian.

Smelling its chance, S7 has stepped up its lobbying in Austria. Chief Executive Vladislav Filev has travelled to Vienna several times in the last few weeks to dispel doubts.

"They really want this deal," says one source close to Austrian's non-executive supervisory board.

But with Russia's relations to the West deteriorating after last month's war in Georgia, Filev's charm offensive cannot easily overcome the Austrian government unease about the risk of exposing its airline to a political crisis that may still have unpredictable consequences.

"It wouldn't be a bad solution at all," the first banker said. "But whether the political background allows it, is the big question."
There are said to be five bids altogether, with BA thought to be one of them, and either Air China, or Turkish the fifth bidder:

http://www.uk-airport-news.info/heat...ews-290808.htm



If Austrian went to Lufthansa there is a possability of the EU Commission launching an anti-competative investigation into the Lufthansa group given its current and proposed spending spree.

Last edited by Magellan; September 23rd, 2008 at 01:40 PM.
Magellan no está en línea   Reply With Quote

Sponsored Links
Old September 23rd, 2008, 01:37 PM   #162
Magellan
Registered User
 
Magellan's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2008
Location: London
Posts: 335
Likes (Received): 0

BMI - A sure thing?

The Times has reported that Eithad is intereted in buying control of BMI:

http://www.uk-airport-news.info/heat...ews-170908.htm


The interesting thing here is the suggestion that Lufthansa/*.* is prepared to consider selling its future controlling stake (it has first call on the sale of the of the main sharehold's stake) in BMI, with its priorities adjusted now that SAS, and Austrian are within it's grasp.

That would be throwing up a big opportunity to get a significant foot-hold in Heathrow (third place in terms of landing/take-off slots) , while at the sametime causing big problems for BA and the Oneworld Alliance.

Lufthansa/*.* has possibly already been making plans on the assumption that it will gain control of BMI next year, with the launch of Heathrow to Milan flights in the Smmer of 2009 (given also that Alitalia will most likely have gone by then):

http://www.uk-airport-news.info/heat...ews-170908.htm


From Eithad's point of view, BMI might make a nice cultural fit, and will help feed traffic into Eithad's long-haul services, but it would still not be a major long-haul player out of Heathrow, given that teh airport is not it's main base. Perhaps a better fit woud be Virgin. Let's see.
Magellan no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old September 24th, 2008, 09:30 AM   #163
Magellan
Registered User
 
Magellan's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2008
Location: London
Posts: 335
Likes (Received): 0

Eastern EU airlines

Nothing much has been mentioned of the clutch of airlines based in the 10 middle-European states that have joined the EU in recent years. It would be interesting therefore to see and compare the situation they are in.

For a start they are largely operating in economies with lower costs but also lower demand for airtravel given the general level of incomes and employment. They do not compete directly with HS Rail, but they are operating in the same business environment as some of the largest and strongest airlines in the world.

Anyone with information?
Magellan no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old September 24th, 2008, 09:37 AM   #164
hkskyline
Hong Kong
 
hkskyline's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2002
Posts: 86,960
Likes (Received): 18219

Quote:
Originally Posted by Magellan View Post
Nothing much has been mentioned of the clutch of airlines based in the 10 middle-European states that have joined the EU in recent years. It would be interesting therefore to see and compare the situation they are in.

For a start they are largely operating in economies with lower costs but also lower demand for airtravel given the general level of incomes and employment. They do not compete directly with HS Rail, but they are operating in the same business environment as some of the largest and strongest airlines in the world.

Anyone with information?
Some updates :

Eastern Europe : Low-Cost Carriers Open New Tourism Opportunities
http://www.skyscrapercity.com/showthread.php?t=219305
__________________
Hong Kong Photo Gallery - Click Here for the Hong Kong Galleries

World Photo Gallery - | St. Petersburg, Russia | Pyongyang | Tokyo | Istanbul | Dubai | Shanghai | Mumbai | Bangkok | Sydney

New York, London, Prague, Iceland, Rocky Mountains, Angkor Wat, Sri Lanka, Poland, Myanmar, and much more!
hkskyline no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old September 24th, 2008, 09:47 AM   #165
Magellan
Registered User
 
Magellan's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2008
Location: London
Posts: 335
Likes (Received): 0

Quote:
Originally Posted by hkskyline View Post
Some updates :

Eastern Europe : Low-Cost Carriers Open New Tourism Opportunities
http://www.skyscrapercity.com/showthread.php?t=219305
Those are the cattle-truck operations end of the market. In terms of consolidation, the most intersting developments will centre on what were the 'national airlines' of those countries.
Magellan no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old September 24th, 2008, 09:58 AM   #166
hkskyline
Hong Kong
 
hkskyline's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2002
Posts: 86,960
Likes (Received): 18219

I actually think the no-frills ones will be more likely to consolidate given the fuel price environment and they don't have economies of scale or diversified markets to balance.
__________________
Hong Kong Photo Gallery - Click Here for the Hong Kong Galleries

World Photo Gallery - | St. Petersburg, Russia | Pyongyang | Tokyo | Istanbul | Dubai | Shanghai | Mumbai | Bangkok | Sydney

New York, London, Prague, Iceland, Rocky Mountains, Angkor Wat, Sri Lanka, Poland, Myanmar, and much more!
hkskyline no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old September 24th, 2008, 10:08 AM   #167
Magellan
Registered User
 
Magellan's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2008
Location: London
Posts: 335
Likes (Received): 0

Quote:
Originally Posted by hkskyline View Post
I actually think the no-frills ones will be more likely to consolidate given the fuel price environment and they don't have economies of scale or diversified markets to balance.
I am not sure that would happen. They are more likely to go out of business. There may be one or two mergers, but in most cases the big low cost operators such as easyJet and Ryan Air can move in and take away their business with little effort given their scale of operations and sharp business sense. I think recent collapses have illustrated this pattern. The last merger of low cost operators that I am aware of was that involving of Air Berlin.
Magellan no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old September 24th, 2008, 11:50 AM   #168
hkskyline
Hong Kong
 
hkskyline's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2002
Posts: 86,960
Likes (Received): 18219

Quote:
Originally Posted by Magellan View Post
I am not sure that would happen. They are more likely to go out of business. There may be one or two mergers, but in most cases the big low cost operators such as easyJet and Ryan Air can move in and take away their business with little effort given their scale of operations and sharp business sense. I think recent collapses have illustrated this pattern. The last merger of low cost operators that I am aware of was that involving of Air Berlin.
I actually meant consolidation to be a combination of M&A and bankruptcies, as the industry is 'consolidating' at this time.
__________________
Hong Kong Photo Gallery - Click Here for the Hong Kong Galleries

World Photo Gallery - | St. Petersburg, Russia | Pyongyang | Tokyo | Istanbul | Dubai | Shanghai | Mumbai | Bangkok | Sydney

New York, London, Prague, Iceland, Rocky Mountains, Angkor Wat, Sri Lanka, Poland, Myanmar, and much more!
hkskyline no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old September 24th, 2008, 11:54 AM   #169
Magellan
Registered User
 
Magellan's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2008
Location: London
Posts: 335
Likes (Received): 0

Quote:
Originally Posted by hkskyline View Post
I actually meant consolidation to be a combination of M&A and bankruptcies, as the industry is 'consolidating' at this time.
Well that's just moving the goal posts - it's not the accepted use of the terminology.
Magellan no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old September 24th, 2008, 12:05 PM   #170
hkskyline
Hong Kong
 
hkskyline's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2002
Posts: 86,960
Likes (Received): 18219

Quote:
Originally Posted by Magellan View Post
Well that's just moving the goal posts - it's not the accepted use of the terminology.
The industry being 'consolidating' is a common term indicating the number of players is decreasing, which is not just about airlines combining with each other. Mergers and acquisitions are not necessarily the same as consolidation. M&A is only a subset of consolidation. It's a subtle difference and the term is used by the consultants who advise on these deals. Perhaps being on the consultant side, my jargon is different from what others use.
__________________
Hong Kong Photo Gallery - Click Here for the Hong Kong Galleries

World Photo Gallery - | St. Petersburg, Russia | Pyongyang | Tokyo | Istanbul | Dubai | Shanghai | Mumbai | Bangkok | Sydney

New York, London, Prague, Iceland, Rocky Mountains, Angkor Wat, Sri Lanka, Poland, Myanmar, and much more!
hkskyline no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old September 24th, 2008, 12:29 PM   #171
Magellan
Registered User
 
Magellan's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2008
Location: London
Posts: 335
Likes (Received): 0

Quote:
Originally Posted by hkskyline View Post
The industry being 'consolidating' is a common term indicating the number of players is decreasing, which is not just about airlines combining with each other. Mergers and acquisitions are not necessarily the same as consolidation. M&A is only a subset of consolidation. It's a subtle difference and the term is used by the consultants who advise on these deals. Perhaps being on the consultant side, my jargon is different from what others use.
Consolidation in consultancy circles does not include bankruptcies. I think you are going off on a tanget again and flooding the thread with junk. Try and keep on topic and don't spoil it for others.
Magellan no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old September 24th, 2008, 01:16 PM   #172
hkskyline
Hong Kong
 
hkskyline's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2002
Posts: 86,960
Likes (Received): 18219

Quote:
Originally Posted by Magellan View Post
Consolidation in consultancy circles does not include bankruptcies. I think you are going off on a tanget again and flooding the thread with junk. Try and keep on topic and don't spoil it for others.
Oh really? Here is a recent example of how consolidation includes bankruptcies :

British Travel Industry Dealt Several New Blows
13 September 2008
The New York Times

LONDON -- Britain's already struggling travel industry suffered a series of setbacks on Friday when a large tour operator collapsed, British Airways offered thousands of managers a buyout and Richard Branson of Virgin Atlantic said he would fight ''tooth and nail'' to prevent a combination of British Airways with American Airlines.

More than 89,000 people were stranded abroad, mainly in Orlando, Fla., and the Caribbean, when the XL Leisure Group, a tour operator, ran out of money and had to ground its airplanes. Another 200,000 people had bookings with XL, which fell victim to higher fuel prices and slower economic growth. XL, which employs about 1,700 people, is based in Crawley, England, and serves 50 destinations.

A spokeswoman did not know how many planes were grounded but said it was the entire fleet.

The Civil Aviation Authority said about 10,000 of the stranded passengers would have to find and pay for their flights back home because they booked flights directly with the company and are thus not eligible for any compensation. The rest, who booked package holidays or flights through another tour operator, will be flown home at no extra cost because they are covered by the Air Travel Organizers' Licensing compensation plan.

XL joined about 24 other airlines and tour operators that went out of business this year, according to the International Air Transport Association. Zoom Airlines, a trans-Atlantic carrier based in Ottawa and at Gatwick airport in London, filed for bankruptcy protection last month. Eos Airlines, a business-class-only carrier, stopped flying in April.

Oil prices, which peaked in July, have hovered near $100 a barrel in recent days, but the decline has not been enough to ease pressure on the airline industry as consumers seek to cut costs amid a slowing economy.

''The summer season is usually the good part of the year for the industry and now this is coming to an end and the outlook is not encouraging,'' said Douglas McNeill, an analyst at the stockbroker Blue Oar Securities, in London. ''The oil price is still high and the situation is very challenging.''

Commercial airlines, including British Airways and Virgin, were in talks with the Civil Aviation Authority to help fly some of XL's stranded passengers back to Britain but those airlines are facing their own difficulties.

British Airways, which has more than 45,000 employees, said Friday that it would offer about 2,000 managers incentives to quit as the airline seeks to reduce its employee costs. The airline chief executive, Willie Walsh, told Bloomberg Television that he expected 300 managers to take the buyout.

''We are in the worst trading environment the industry has ever faced and must take action to offset the combined effects of the continuing global economic downturn, weakened consumer confidence and high fuel prices,'' British Airways said in a statement.

British Airways announced plans last month to enter into a revenue-sharing venture with American Airlines and Iberia Lineas Aereas de Espana of Spain on flights between Europe and North America. The combination, British Airways said, would give customers access to better fares and frequent-flier miles but the plan is being examined by regulators concerned about antitrust violations.

Mr. Branson, Virgin Atlantic's president, said on Friday that he was determined to stop the revenue-sharing venture, which he said would create a ''dominant market player'' and hurt customers as much as rivals. Mr. Branson plans to spend ''millions of dollars'' on a campaign to block the combination, which includes painting ''No Way BA/AA'' onto every Virgin aircraft, buying advertising space and hiring lobbyists.

''The economic downturn is no excuse for authorities to allow that combination,'' Mr. Branson said at a news conference at London's Heathrow airport. ''They are both strong and don't have financial problems, and even if they did, an unfair market place must not be created. We'll fight tooth and nail to prevent that merger.''

It would be the third such campaign for Mr. Branson, who opposed two earlier failed efforts -- one in 1997 and another in 2001 -- by British Airways and American Airlines to combine.

Yet, some analysts said that consolidation might be the only way forward for many airline operators and that more airlines could go out of business, especially smaller ones unable to pass on the higher costs to its customers.

''There are still more than 100 airlines in Europe and it's getting more difficult for an increasing number of them,'' an analyst at Panmure Gordon in London, Gert Zonneveld, said. ''We'll certainly see more trouble in the industry before the end of the year.''
__________________
Hong Kong Photo Gallery - Click Here for the Hong Kong Galleries

World Photo Gallery - | St. Petersburg, Russia | Pyongyang | Tokyo | Istanbul | Dubai | Shanghai | Mumbai | Bangkok | Sydney

New York, London, Prague, Iceland, Rocky Mountains, Angkor Wat, Sri Lanka, Poland, Myanmar, and much more!
hkskyline no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old September 25th, 2008, 10:28 AM   #173
Magellan
Registered User
 
Magellan's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2008
Location: London
Posts: 335
Likes (Received): 0

Quote:
Originally Posted by hkskyline View Post
Oh really? Here is a recent example of how consolidation includes bankruptcies :

British Travel Industry Dealt Several New Blows
13 September 2008
The New York Times

LONDON -- Britain's already struggling travel industry suffered a series of setbacks on Friday when a large tour operator collapsed, British Airways offered thousands of managers a buyout and Richard Branson of Virgin Atlantic said he would fight ''tooth and nail'' to prevent a combination of British Airways with American Airlines.

More than 89,000 people were stranded abroad, mainly in Orlando, Fla., and the Caribbean, when the XL Leisure Group, a tour operator, ran out of money and had to ground its airplanes. Another 200,000 people had bookings with XL, which fell victim to higher fuel prices and slower economic growth. XL, which employs about 1,700 people, is based in Crawley, England, and serves 50 destinations.

A spokeswoman did not know how many planes were grounded but said it was the entire fleet.

The Civil Aviation Authority said about 10,000 of the stranded passengers would have to find and pay for their flights back home because they booked flights directly with the company and are thus not eligible for any compensation. The rest, who booked package holidays or flights through another tour operator, will be flown home at no extra cost because they are covered by the Air Travel Organizers' Licensing compensation plan.

XL joined about 24 other airlines and tour operators that went out of business this year, according to the International Air Transport Association. Zoom Airlines, a trans-Atlantic carrier based in Ottawa and at Gatwick airport in London, filed for bankruptcy protection last month. Eos Airlines, a business-class-only carrier, stopped flying in April.

Oil prices, which peaked in July, have hovered near $100 a barrel in recent days, but the decline has not been enough to ease pressure on the airline industry as consumers seek to cut costs amid a slowing economy.

''The summer season is usually the good part of the year for the industry and now this is coming to an end and the outlook is not encouraging,'' said Douglas McNeill, an analyst at the stockbroker Blue Oar Securities, in London. ''The oil price is still high and the situation is very challenging.''

Commercial airlines, including British Airways and Virgin, were in talks with the Civil Aviation Authority to help fly some of XL's stranded passengers back to Britain but those airlines are facing their own difficulties.

British Airways, which has more than 45,000 employees, said Friday that it would offer about 2,000 managers incentives to quit as the airline seeks to reduce its employee costs. The airline chief executive, Willie Walsh, told Bloomberg Television that he expected 300 managers to take the buyout.

''We are in the worst trading environment the industry has ever faced and must take action to offset the combined effects of the continuing global economic downturn, weakened consumer confidence and high fuel prices,'' British Airways said in a statement.

British Airways announced plans last month to enter into a revenue-sharing venture with American Airlines and Iberia Lineas Aereas de Espana of Spain on flights between Europe and North America. The combination, British Airways said, would give customers access to better fares and frequent-flier miles but the plan is being examined by regulators concerned about antitrust violations.

Mr. Branson, Virgin Atlantic's president, said on Friday that he was determined to stop the revenue-sharing venture, which he said would create a ''dominant market player'' and hurt customers as much as rivals. Mr. Branson plans to spend ''millions of dollars'' on a campaign to block the combination, which includes painting ''No Way BA/AA'' onto every Virgin aircraft, buying advertising space and hiring lobbyists.

''The economic downturn is no excuse for authorities to allow that combination,'' Mr. Branson said at a news conference at London's Heathrow airport. ''They are both strong and don't have financial problems, and even if they did, an unfair market place must not be created. We'll fight tooth and nail to prevent that merger.''

It would be the third such campaign for Mr. Branson, who opposed two earlier failed efforts -- one in 1997 and another in 2001 -- by British Airways and American Airlines to combine.

Yet, some analysts said that consolidation might be the only way forward for many airline operators and that more airlines could go out of business, especially smaller ones unable to pass on the higher costs to its customers.

''There are still more than 100 airlines in Europe and it's getting more difficult for an increasing number of them,'' an analyst at Panmure Gordon in London, Gert Zonneveld, said. ''We'll certainly see more trouble in the industry before the end of the year.''
There is nothing to do with consolidation in that article. None of the players have aquired terratory from the failed airline. There is more to consultancy than copy/paste - there are enough of that kind in the world, and many of them have causde the sort of problems that the airline industry is experiencing now.
Magellan no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old September 25th, 2008, 02:45 PM   #174
hkskyline
Hong Kong
 
hkskyline's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2002
Posts: 86,960
Likes (Received): 18219

Quote:
Originally Posted by Magellan View Post
There is nothing to do with consolidation in that article. None of the players have aquired terratory from the failed airline. There is more to consultancy than copy/paste - there are enough of that kind in the world, and many of them have causde the sort of problems that the airline industry is experiencing now.
It's a correction and a consolidation. Consolidation should not be intepreted in a literal sense as to mean only an acquisition or merger. Consolidation is far broader, as capacity decrease can arise from a bankruptcy or an M&A deal, and consultants will be involved in both cases. An economic downturn can lead to consolidation, which is not solely limited to M&A. Capacity decrease is an effect of consolidation, which is not solely caused by M&A either.
__________________
Hong Kong Photo Gallery - Click Here for the Hong Kong Galleries

World Photo Gallery - | St. Petersburg, Russia | Pyongyang | Tokyo | Istanbul | Dubai | Shanghai | Mumbai | Bangkok | Sydney

New York, London, Prague, Iceland, Rocky Mountains, Angkor Wat, Sri Lanka, Poland, Myanmar, and much more!
hkskyline no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old November 4th, 2008, 06:40 AM   #175
hkskyline
Hong Kong
 
hkskyline's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2002
Posts: 86,960
Likes (Received): 18219

EU bans airlines from hiding taxes and charges

BRUSSELS, Oct 30 (Reuters) - European Union airlines will this week be banned from hiding taxes and extra charges when advertising their flights, the EU's executive said on Thursday.

The European Commission also said its new regulations on air services, which come into force on Saturday, gives European nations extra powers to prevent airline bankruptcies, which often leave passengers stranded.

"Airlines will be required to include all taxes and charges in the final price of the ticket ... and this from the moment of publicising the prices," a Commission spokesman told a daily briefing.

"That means no hidden charges, no hidden fees or taxes, full transparency and the possibility of informed choices," he added.

The rules also prevent carriers from charging different prices for the same flight if booked from different national websites.

And to reduce the risk of airline start-ups going bankrupt they will have to provide more information about their financial resources to national authorities.

"If an air carrier can no longer meet its actual and potential obligations for a 12-month period, the authority shall suspend or revoke the operating licence," said a statement.

The new rules come into force as airlines struggle with a cocktail of soaring fuel costs, slowing consumer demand and the impact of the credit crisis on banking liquidity.

Over 30 airlines have failed worldwide so far this year and a similar number are expected to collapse in coming months, as travel slows in the northern hemisphere winter.

The EU's new rules include emergency procedures for the replacement of airlines that fail while serving a remote region or island that depends on the air link for economic survival.
__________________
Hong Kong Photo Gallery - Click Here for the Hong Kong Galleries

World Photo Gallery - | St. Petersburg, Russia | Pyongyang | Tokyo | Istanbul | Dubai | Shanghai | Mumbai | Bangkok | Sydney

New York, London, Prague, Iceland, Rocky Mountains, Angkor Wat, Sri Lanka, Poland, Myanmar, and much more!
hkskyline no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old November 4th, 2008, 06:54 AM   #176
spongeg
Registered User
 
spongeg's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2006
Location: Coquitlam/Rainbow Lake
Posts: 8,039
Likes (Received): 1742

I wish they would do that here in Canada - its awful to find out the real price of a $199 fare (usually ends up being around $850)
spongeg no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old November 4th, 2008, 08:05 AM   #177
hkskyline
Hong Kong
 
hkskyline's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2002
Posts: 86,960
Likes (Received): 18219

Quote:
Originally Posted by spongeg View Post
I wish they would do that here in Canada - its awful to find out the real price of a $199 fare (usually ends up being around $850)
Yes, I remember trying to book a redemption ticket with my Aeroplan points to a regional destination (15k points) and was shocked to find taxes costed over CAD 100 already for the 'free' ticket.

There used to be a lot of rock-bottom transatlantic specials with advertised fares of CAD 299 / 399 roundtrip. With taxes, the final figure would double ... quite misleading indeed.
__________________
Hong Kong Photo Gallery - Click Here for the Hong Kong Galleries

World Photo Gallery - | St. Petersburg, Russia | Pyongyang | Tokyo | Istanbul | Dubai | Shanghai | Mumbai | Bangkok | Sydney

New York, London, Prague, Iceland, Rocky Mountains, Angkor Wat, Sri Lanka, Poland, Myanmar, and much more!
hkskyline no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old November 4th, 2008, 11:18 AM   #178
goschio
proud Kuffar
 
goschio's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2002
Location: Ujerumani
Posts: 6,060
Likes (Received): 4267

That is all good news. Hate these hidden taxes and extra costs.
__________________
Isaiah 28:2
Behold, the Lord hath a mighty and strong one, which as a tempest of hail and a destroying storm, as a flood of mighty waters overflowing, shall cast down to the earth with the hand.

Matthew 7:25
And the rain descended, and the floods came, and the winds blew, and beat upon that house; and it fell: and great was the fall of it.
goschio no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old November 11th, 2008, 05:53 AM   #179
hkskyline
Hong Kong
 
hkskyline's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2002
Posts: 86,960
Likes (Received): 18219

British Airways says consolidation will speed up
10 November 2008

NEW YORK (AP) - The chief executive of British Airways PLC said Monday he expects consolidation in the airline industry to speed up, but he added that the London-based carrier will be extremely selective in the companies it chooses to team up with.

Speaking at an analyst conference in New York, CEO Willie Walsh forecast more airlines will falter in the coming months as global economic conditions remain tentative. But Walsh said the company will not invest in weakened companies that might put British Airways' financial position at risk.

"Any consolidations that we pursue will serve to strengthen us," Walsh said. "And in this climate, that means a lot of acquisitions go by."

In tandem with its first-half results, the company on Friday said it is eyeing a relationship with CAI, a group of Italian investors set up to save bankrupt Alitalia. However, Walsh said the company would not seek an equity stake in the new company. London-based British Airways is also continuing talks with Spanish carrier Iberia.

Walsh said at the conference the company is taking a conservative approach in general as it expects the global economy to get worse before it gets better.

"We're still heading into the eye of the storm -- we're not yet coming out the other end," he said.

British Airways on Friday reported a first-half net loss of 49 million pounds ($77 million), blaming record oil prices and the growing global economic slowdown.
__________________
Hong Kong Photo Gallery - Click Here for the Hong Kong Galleries

World Photo Gallery - | St. Petersburg, Russia | Pyongyang | Tokyo | Istanbul | Dubai | Shanghai | Mumbai | Bangkok | Sydney

New York, London, Prague, Iceland, Rocky Mountains, Angkor Wat, Sri Lanka, Poland, Myanmar, and much more!
hkskyline no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old November 12th, 2008, 03:29 AM   #180
hkskyline
Hong Kong
 
hkskyline's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2002
Posts: 86,960
Likes (Received): 18219

Airline sector recovery seen in 2010 after downturn

BERLIN, Nov 11 (Reuters) - Tough times facing European airlines amid the global financial crisis are likely to ease within a couple of years, executives including Airbus CEO Thomas Enders said on Tuesday.

"We are sticking with our long-term outlook. When the impact of the global financial crisis has passed, air traffic will double every 15 to 20 years," Enders told an industry conference.

Airlines around the world have been hit by declining demand for air travel as the global financial crisis hits companies and consumers. In September, global air traffic shrank for the first time since the SARS epidemic in 2003, the International Air Transport Association said last month.

Enders said some of Airbus' customers have cancelled orders, but not at a dramatic level. In 2009 the number of new orders will fall significantly from this year.

German airport operator Fraport's Chief Executive Wilhelm Bender said he expected air traffic in Frankfurt, where it runs Germany's biggest airport, to ease in 2009 before picking up again in the following year.

In the meantime, it seeks to raise the fees it charges airlines to land at its main airport in Frankfurt by 2 percent to help offset the impact of falling passenger numbers.

Deutsche Lufthansa , Fraport's biggest customer, said on Tuesday it transported 1.4 percent fewer passengers in October than a year earlier, with the decline led by its European business. It also filled a smaller percentage of its available seats and cargo space last month.

NEED FOR OVERSEAS GROWTH

Lufthansa Chief Executive Wolfgang Mayrhuber said to compete airlines needed to focus on growth around the world, and not just in their home markets.

"If we wanted to keep our global market share, which is at only about 3 percent, by growing in Germany we'd need a second Frankfurt or a second Munich," he said.

The German carrier has its two hubs in Frankfurt and Munich. The cash-rich airline has been eyeing possible acquisitions outside its home market to boost growth.

Lufthansa last month made a move on Britain's bmi [BMID.UL] and gained headway in the bidding for Austrian Airlines . Sources said the airline has broken off talks to buy Sweden's SAS to focus its efforts on Austrian Airlines and Alitalia , which is also seeking an investor.

The crisis has not only hurt airlines, but also companies that make parts and offer services to the aviation industry. MTU Aero Engines has said it saw no or little sales growth in 2009 as airlines hold off overhauling engines and running new planes.

To help support aviation suppliers, Airbus CEO Enders called for more government-sponsored research funds. There was already such a fund in France with a volume of about 60 million euros ($76.42 million), and industry associations are in talks with the German government to set up a similar fund there, he said.
__________________
Hong Kong Photo Gallery - Click Here for the Hong Kong Galleries

World Photo Gallery - | St. Petersburg, Russia | Pyongyang | Tokyo | Istanbul | Dubai | Shanghai | Mumbai | Bangkok | Sydney

New York, London, Prague, Iceland, Rocky Mountains, Angkor Wat, Sri Lanka, Poland, Myanmar, and much more!
hkskyline no está en línea   Reply With Quote


Reply

Thread Tools

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Related topics on SkyscraperCity


All times are GMT +2. The time now is 11:19 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.11 Beta 4
Copyright ©2000 - 2018, vBulletin Solutions Inc.
Feedback Buttons provided by Advanced Post Thanks / Like (Pro) - vBulletin Mods & Addons Copyright © 2018 DragonByte Technologies Ltd.

vBulletin Optimisation provided by vB Optimise (Pro) - vBulletin Mods & Addons Copyright © 2018 DragonByte Technologies Ltd.

SkyscraperCity ☆ In Urbanity We trust ☆ about us | privacy policy | DMCA policy

tech management by Sysprosium