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Old September 10th, 2009, 12:22 PM   #841
Schmeek
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OT and Stanley Park for semis? Not both.
It will most certainly be OT and one in London.
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Old September 10th, 2009, 02:36 PM   #842
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Give up on this thread, Australia is getting the 2018 WC, and thats that.
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Old September 10th, 2009, 02:49 PM   #843
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Oh OK then!
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Old September 10th, 2009, 04:33 PM   #844
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Well. Least us Brits can entice your ladies
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Old September 11th, 2009, 01:15 AM   #845
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MelbournesNT View Post
Give up on this thread, Australia is getting the 2018 WC, and thats that.
cant see it at all
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Old September 11th, 2009, 01:24 AM   #846
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the sheffield bid man in charge paul cant remember his second name said the sheffield bid is seen to be very striong by the fa and the fanzone could be unique with the donvalley area been a strong possibility with the don valley stadium the arena and don valley bowl this was on radio sheffield btw.
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Old November 21st, 2009, 04:42 PM   #847
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Football's coming home?

Skysports.com looks at the 16 locations in England which are hoping to be included in the bid to host the 2018 World Cup finals

The competition to host the 2018 World Cup is gathering pace and England is therefore preparing to fine tune its bid by selecting the 12 venues which will act as potential stages for the competition.

A Football Association committee, charged with the task of picking the correct locations to include in an overall proposal designed to bring football home, is therefore considering its options from 16 possible candidates before cutting four candidates from the running and submitting an agreed application to Fifa.

The FA will select its 12 venues focusing on the Fifa requirements of stadia, training facilities, base camps and Fan Parks. There is also an expectation for public support, excellent accommodation and transport services, and robust plans for safety, security and sustainability.

Birmingham

England's 'Second City' would expect to be one of the lynchpins of a 2018 World Cup in the country and it already appears well suited for the job.

In Villa Park, Birmingham has a 43,000-seater ground which is adept at hosting major footballing events after perennially staging FA Cup semi-finals, while plans are to update and increase capacity and quality.

Villa Park was a venue during the 1996 European Championship and provided the scene for the last Cup Winners' Cup final in 1999.

International events also take place at the National Exhibition Centre and the National Indoor Arena, meaning the city already has organisational experience, superb travel links and potential areas for training and media.

A geographical location in the centre of England helps in regards to access, a factor which saw a culturally-vibrant Birmingham considered for a new national stadium prior to the re-development of Wembley.

Birmingham City's previous owners had plans for a City of Birmingham Stadium at a suburban Brownfield site, which could have been an option, but this now appears unlikely.

Bristol

The city is perfectly positioned to act as a venue in the South West of the country, with only Plymouth offering competition in the region.

Bristol City's new stadium in the Alderman Moores allotments area has been partially agreed by the council and it has been reported that FA bid committee members have already carried out an inspection.

Bristol has hosted international cricket matches and so is aware of the necessary procedures of catering for the needs of visiting fans, travel and safety.

The city also provides a piece of English history which would be in contrast to more metropolitan areas, with an abundance of inner-city green spaces and a scenic working harbour seemingly ideal for Fan Zones.

If fully-approved, built and selected as a venue, City's new 30,000-seater stadium, which has been the subject of complaints regarding environmental issues, would be expanded to meet Fifa's minimum capacity of 40,000 for the World Cup.

Blue Square Premier side Forest Green Rovers would act as a training venue for teams if Bristol is picked.

Derby

Pride Park is the figurehead for Derby as the modern stadium is already in good condition to host World Cup matches.

The 30,000 capacity would only need to be slightly increased, but the out-of-town setting would mean that should not be an issue.

Derby County's 1997-built ground is up to date in comparison with some and therefore has all the necessary trimmings, including car parking and a comfortable walk to the city's train station.

As with Birmingham, a Midlands position works in its favour and makes travel complaints less of an issue.

But if local rivals Nottingham's plans for a new stadium are selected, Derby's bid could stumble.

Hull

The city has come in for ridicule in the past, but it is now a bustling area and all the ambition is in place to prove a vibrant World Cup venue.

Proposals are to expand Premier League Hull City's small, but impressive, 2002-built KC Stadium to a 46,000 capacity and the edge-of-city location and comfortable access, aided by a park and ride system, should mean that is not a problem.

There are also plans for a specialised train station to be built next to the stadium, although the central station is within walking distance.

Hull has invested heavily in transforming its image and building a mix of culture and entertainment, including the renowned The Deep aquatic attraction.

FA inspectors have already visited Hull on at least two occasions, meeting with the likes of Hull City manager Phil Brown.

Leeds

Sport is central to the city, with the hugely successful rugby league side Leeds Rhinos and fallen football giants Leeds United.

The sporting facilities are therefore in place to reflect the passion, and Elland Road, the home of United, would provide a sizeable and well-equipped venue.

A capacity of more than 40,000 would require only a bit of housekeeping and the experience of hosting games during Euro 96 and rugby league finals also bodes well.

Leeds, which has been visited by bid officials, has produced a DVD promoting its bid and copies have been circulated to local schools in order to generate interest among youngsters.

The city boasts attractive shops, nightlife and excellent travel links to the north and south, while it is also in close proximity to the picturesque Yorkshire Dales.

Roundhay Park has staged music concerts including the likes of Robbie Williams and would provide an excellent area for a Fan Park within easy reach of the city centre.

Headingley Stadium on the outskirts of the city could be an option for meeting visiting teams' training requirements.

Leicester

The Walkers Stadium, the home of Leicester City, would be the obvious focal point for a bid, which is backed by World Cup legends Peter Shilton and Gary Lineker.

After opening in the 2002/03 season, the ground has played host to Premier League and international football, and European rugby to build experience of hosting major sporting events.

Plans to expand a current capacity of 32,500 to 45,000 have already been outlined to officials and there is potential to add a further 10,000 seats.

Leicester has obtained the support of the famous sporting facilities at Loughborough University, home of the National Cricket Academy, to offer a state-of-the-art training base as part of its bid.

Leicester Tigers' Welford Road Stadium, which will play an important role in the rugby union World Cup in 2015, could also accommodate sides' preparations.

The city's Victoria Park and Abbey Park have been highlighted as suitable venues for Fan Parks following Germany's success with this scheme in 2006.

As with all Midlands-based bids, a central position in England will greatly boost Leicester's prospects, but the competition for places will be keenly contested.

Liverpool

The passion for football on Merseyside is rightly being used as a selling point for a bid, which also features the prospect of two new stadia.

Liverpool and Everton both have plans to move from Anfield and Goodison Park, respectively, to plush homes in Stanley Park and Kirkby which should be ready for 2018.

Either ground could act as a venue, but it is likely that it will only be London that is handed the luxury of two stadia in one city so there could be direct competition.

There are concerns regarding a recession-induced delay on Liverpool's new ground, which is planned to seat in the region of 61,000 with an option for expansion, while Everton's move has been met by local complaints.

Anfield and Goodison Park will be considered if new grounds are not available but, despite quality and history, aging grounds and poor travel links to out-of-city locations could prove an issue in the FA's assessment.

Stanley Park or the world famous Albert Docks in the city's centre would act as excellent bases for Fan Parks.

A status as the 2008 European City of Culture saw a detailed development and clean-up of the city, investing more than £400million in the last decade, which earned excellent results and reviews.

London

The capital would be viewed as the HQ for a World Cup and is certain to host the final, if England is selected, but it also has selling points of stadia, travel, public spaces and experience which could obtain additional matches.

Wembley, the home of the England national team, is the ace in the pack and has played host to a range of international sporting and music events, while with 90,000 seats and a sliding roof it comfortably meets Fifa rules on capacity for the opening match and the final.

Arsenal's 2006-built Emirates Stadium could easily act as a semi-final venue after being designed to high quality and security specifics with a capacity of 60,000 at a cost in the region of £430million.

Chelsea's Stamford Bridge would be in contention to host group games after a revamp in recent years saw hotels, bars and restaurants attached to the stadium, which seats around 42,000 before a possible expansion.

The Bridge, though, faces a tough task to sway the bid committee when up against Wembley and The Emirates, while even the 2012 Olympic Stadium could be considered for matches, media and training.

Fulham's Craven Cottage and West Ham's Upton Park could also be used as preparation bases.

London's bid team, London United, have released a promotional video 'Park Life' which highlights the integration between professional sport and grass roots.

Manchester

The city is using a reputation for attracting major sporting events as the foundations of a bid in the North West.

Manchester has hosted a UEFA Champions League final, FA Cup semi-finals, European Championship football, international cricket, the world swimming championship and the Commonwealth Games in recent years to carve significant potential, while Olympic events will also be held in the city in 2012.

The fame of Manchester United and the emerging ambition of Manchester City are lures for fans, with both Old Trafford and the 48,000-seater City of Manchester Stadium offering excellent potential venues.

Manchester City Council is also keen to point out a grassroots football programme designed to offer support from schools to the professional level.

Despite trouble surrounding the 2008 Uefa Cup final, Fan Parks would be possible in a city centre which was rejuvenated in the 1990s, while both stadia are accessible by public transport.

Old Trafford, which has its own train station and is the only Uefa five-star-rated facility in England, and its capacity in the region of 76,000 would be a definite venue for a semi-final.

The City of Manchester Stadium may find it difficult to be involved considering the probability that only London will enjoy the luxury of two stadia in one city.

Milton Keynes

Stadium:mk is one of the most modern grounds bidding to host World Cup matches and Milton Keynes hopes that will work in its favour.

Though only currently hosting League One football, the town is ambitious regarding the future in football and expects to be playing at a higher level by 2018.

Milton Keynes has hosted Under 21 internationals and the stadium has been given a four-star rating by Uefa, meaning it would be capable of hosting a Europa League final.

There are current plans to increase a 22,000 capacity by 10,000 seats and that could be expanded further above the 40,000 minimum by the time of the finals.

Milton Keynes, which has only been in existence for around 40 years, hopes that the FA will be keen to spread host venues around England and that there will be a desire to place possibly less-famous venues on the map.

An 88-page brochure has been handed to FA representatives and when bid committee members re-visited in September plans were outlined for a £20million development of stadium:mk, which would include the addition of two new tiers, a sports store, health club, restaurants, a media area and a medical centre.

Newport Pagnell, Stony Stratford and Manor Fields in Bletchley have been visited by inspectors and could offer training bases.

It has been claimed that Milton Keynes' 'unique road grid system' makes travelling 'quick and easy'.

NewcastleGateshead

In a similar scenario to Liverpool, the much-heralded love of football in the North East is being used in promotion and the Geordie spirit is a particular highlight.

NewcastleGateshead boasts a host of sporting venues from Newcastle's St James' Park to the Newcastle Arena and the Gateshead Athletics Stadium, while the Great North Run, the world's largest half marathon, also takes place in the region.

St James' Park would be the centrepiece venue at a capacity of 52,000 that is within easy walking distance of the city centre and has hosted matches at Euro 96.

The surrounding Newcastle University, Benfield Centre for Sporting Excellence and a planned International Conference facility, which is undergoing a feasibility assessment, would cater for visiting teams, fans and media.

A formerly industrial area has undergone a facelift over the last 10 years after £300million worth of investment to improve cultural facilities, especially in the Quayside area, meaning very little alterations would be required to host World Cup matches.

Nottingham

A bid will be centred around a two kilometre long River Trent World Cup Park, which will connect the city centre to a newly-built stadium, media centre, VIP area and camping facilities for visiting fans.

Nottingham Forest's new environmentally-friendly stadium, planned to be built by 2014 and expected to hold around 45,000 spectators, will be the heart of the Park in the city's Gamston area.

The development would also include the construction of schools, a shopping centre and community sports facilities, which are likely to impress Fifa.

Plans are in place to increase the capacity of the new stadium, which has a proposed name of Brian Clough Stadium, should Championship side Forest regain Premier League status.

However, Nottinghamshire County Council has indicated that it is not in favour of a new stadium and would prefer a bid based on the City Ground.

The fame of Forest, two-time European Cup winners in the 1970s, will also be used in the bid while the recent renewal of aspirations at Notts County, the Football League's oldest club, could play a part.

Nottingham regularly hosts international Test cricket to demonstrate an ability to host major sporting events.

Plymouth

A scenic, one-off location and distinctive identity will work in Plymouth's favour if the bid committee are eager to spread matches across England in order to improve access to the entire country.

Plymouth Argyle's stadium, Home Park, has already undergone a relatively recent revamp and therefore only additional expansion, to a proposed capacity of 45,000, would be required if selected.

The ground's setting will prove positive, with the stadium surrounded by a green area ideal for a Fan Park, while the natural amphitheatre of Plymouth Hoe, which overlooks the harbour, would also offer an excellent setting for visitors.

World Cup football would be seen as a superb soapbox for promoting the sport in the region and possibly increasing the status of clubs in Devon and Cornwall.

The city was a latecomer to bidding but has planned for rapid improvements to transportation, sporting facilities, accommodation and events at grassroots level in order to leave a legacy of the finals.

St James Park, the ground of neighbours Exeter City, is a potential training base for visiting teams competing in the World Cup.

It is expected that Plymouth or Bristol will be nominated, and not both, so competition is fierce.

Portsmouth

A replacement for Portsmouth's current ground, Fratton Park, is the main focus of a bid and would hope to capitalise on a lack of competition on the South East coast.

The club have been working with architects regarding a new stadium for a number of years, but it remains to be seen if the finances are available for such a project.

Heritage would be a major selling point for a bid, with a historic dockyard at the centre of advertising.

Portsmouth already possesses good travel links to meet Fifa requirements for access, and green or waterside areas would be ideal for Fan Parks.

However, a successful bid would be entirely dependent on guarantees that a new stadium would be developed.

Sheffield

A bid has been launched under the eye of 'Sheffield 2018', which is a team of stakeholders with expertise in specific fields and has earned backing from Fifa president Sepp Blatter.

Arch-rivals Sheffield Wednesday and Sheffield United have joined forces, but both respective grounds, Hillsborough and Bramall Lane, have aspirations towards hosting games.

It is therefore expected that it will come down to one or the other, with London expected to be the only city to be awarded two grounds.

Bramall Lane now holds approximately 32,500 after recent development, and planning permission has been approved for further expansion to meet the 40,000 minimum criteria and to include conference facilities ideal for media.

United's ground would have the edge in terms of being adjacent to the city centre, but Hillsborough, which was a Euro 96 venue and has hosted FA Cup semi-finals, holds the advantage of a surrounding green area perfect for a Fan Park.

A £22million revamp, including a new education facility and increase to a 45,000 capacity, has been approved by the city's council and will take place if the ground is selected.

Both grounds are within access of the city's major train stations, with Hillsborough connected by a 'Supertram' network.

The nearby Don Valley Stadium could be used as a Fan Park and would provide an ideal base for training facilities or media.

Sunderland

The atmospheric, 49,000-seater Stadium of Light will take much of the focus for Sunderland's bid and the Premier League football club already has strong community projects.

England have played World Cup qualifiers in Sunderland during the re-development of Wembley, while the Academy of Light would provide a training base of international pedigree.

Due to the relatively modern build of the ground, the Stadium of Light is already well equipped to deal with media demands and that of Fifa.

There would, however, need to be improvements to parking, although a Metro line and park and ride system serve the area, while plans for additional footbridges across the south bank of the nearby River Wear have been mooted.

Durham County Cricket Club's ground at Chester-le-Street has been included in the bid process as a potential training venue.


http://www.skysports.com/story/0,195...700566,00.html
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Old November 21st, 2009, 04:42 PM   #848
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Really excellent series of video reports on each of England's bidding cities (10 mins)

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Old November 21st, 2009, 04:57 PM   #849
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So, which four cities should the bid team drop?
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Old November 21st, 2009, 05:17 PM   #850
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So, which four cities should the bid team drop?

The four I'd drop would be:

Plymouth
Milton Keynes
Leicester
Hull


Plymouth's plans don't seem as good as Bristol's and only one South-West city should be put forward.

Milton Keynes isn't a city I'd want to show off to the world and the manner in which the club was created still leaves a bad taste in the mouth amongst many.

I had to drop one East Mids City as having Nottingham, Derby and Leicester in the final running is unrealistic. Nottingham is my favourite of the three whichever stadium they put forward, so then it was a matter of choosing which of the identikit stadiums was cut. Having been to Pride Park a couple of times I have a soft spot for Derby and their fans and my last visit to Leicester didn't leave me wanting to go back. So Leicester is out, despite Lineker's support.

I'm reluctantly cutting Hull only because I don't want to cut Sheffield or Leeds. I nearly put Portsmouth as my fourth city to be cut (because of their financial situation), but that would leave the map of bid cities looking quite top heavy. They need to get their act together though.
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Old November 21st, 2009, 06:09 PM   #851
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Apart from Manchester, Newcastle, Sunderland and Liverpool of course.
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Old November 22nd, 2009, 02:13 AM   #852
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Quote:
Originally Posted by RobH View Post
So, which four cities should the bid team drop?

The four I'd drop would be:

Plymouth
Milton Keynes
Leicester
Hull


Plymouth's plans don't seem as good as Bristol's and only one South-West city should be put forward.

Milton Keynes isn't a city I'd want to show off to the world and the manner in which the club was created still leaves a bad taste in the mouth amongst many.

I had to drop one East Mids City as having Nottingham, Derby and Leicester in the final running is unrealistic. Nottingham is my favourite of the three whichever stadium they put forward, so then it was a matter of choosing which of the identikit stadiums was cut. Having been to Pride Park a couple of times I have a soft spot for Derby and their fans and my last visit to Leicester didn't leave me wanting to go back. So Leicester is out, despite Lineker's support.

I'm reluctantly cutting Hull only because I don't want to cut Sheffield or Leeds. I nearly put Portsmouth as my fourth city to be cut (because of their financial situation), but that would leave the map of bid cities looking quite top heavy. They need to get their act together though.
There are 16 bid cities, so surely you have to drop 5 cities and have 2 stadiums in London, no?

There should be at least 4 venues in the south of England, 2 in the midlands and 6 in the north.

So i'd drop the 4 you mentioned, although i'd prefer Plymouth of Sunderland as the impoverished far south west would be completely neglected (and to balance it out), but i'd also drop derby in favour of a second london venue. Derby and Nottingham are almost the same urban area and definately part of the same metro.

So I'd drop:
Plymouth or Sunderland
Milton Keynes
Leicester
Hull
Derby
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Old November 22nd, 2009, 01:24 PM   #853
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Quote:
There are 16 bid cities, so surely you have to drop 5 cities and have 2 stadiums in London, no?
I don't think so, no. The article I posted above is quite clear that 4 cities will be dropped by the FA. And a quick search on Google News suggest this isn't an error as lots of other news sources are reporting the same.

Besides which, at the bidding stage countries only present the cities they are putting forward. So we'll effectively put forward both Sheffield stadiums as options, three or four London stadiums, both Merseyside stadiums, both Manchester stadiums etc. in our final bid.

Only when a country has won the bid do FIFA, that country's organising committee, and the sponsors choose the stadiums.

Last edited by RobH; November 22nd, 2009 at 02:19 PM.
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Old November 22nd, 2009, 02:49 PM   #854
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I didn't really read the article, but why are we shearing off cities now then, wait til after the bid surely?

I always thought it was FIFA who chose cities from our selection not vice-versa

That's also why I think Plymouth will get the nod, as i've said be for geographical coverage 2m plus people in devon and cornwall who receive a lot of EU funding as it is iirc.
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Old November 22nd, 2009, 03:57 PM   #855
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I'm not really sure what the thought process is. I know Holland/Belgium have recently selected 12 cities to present to FIFA. Perhaps 12 cities is the requirement at this stage. If Mo's reading this thread maybe he'll be able to tell us, he seems to know a lot about the FIFA selection process.
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Old November 22nd, 2009, 07:39 PM   #856
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I think that in both the 2010 and the 2014 WCs the choice of the host cities was up to FIFA AFTER the countries were chosen hosts, but I'm only sure about the 2014 one.

Brazil picked 16 pre-qualified cities. FIFA wanted us to have 8-10 hosts, but our football confederation pushed to get 12 cities to host the games. Then, FIFA selected the 12 hosts. However, according to the progress of the works in the cities, FIFA will confirm the host cities in 2011, and may cut out some host cities that are lagging behind in their works.
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Old November 23rd, 2009, 12:19 AM   #857
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Wasn't Bristol promoting itself as the South-West's city? I know it is not in the heart of the SW (i.e. cornwall, devon and somerset), but it is technically part of that region going by the government's official definition of English regions. I think the FA would probably prefer the NE to have 2 venues than the SW simply due to the fact they already have 2 stadiums of high capacity, plus it’s seen as a football 'heartland'. But hey, who knows what goes in within the minds of FA personnel!
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Old November 23rd, 2009, 09:42 AM   #858
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English team, Mexican Wave, South African stadium - 20 November 2009






The team from Hull & Humber took time out from boat preparations to pay a visit to Cape Town’s newest construction.

Green Point Stadium has been built to host the 2010 FIFA World Cup and in just 26 days time, the finished project will be handed over to the city. It has taken three years to complete and the bold and modern design will be able to seat 70,000 fans. The first match will be played there on June 29th and it will also host quarter and semi final games.

For now, the site is very much the domain of the constructors but thanks to Tourism Cape Town, the crew were allowed a unique glimpse of the site. With almost all the seats in place, the floodlights on and the pitch growing a healthy shade of green, it is clearly going to be a venue of character and atmosphere.

Wearing their ‘Back the Bid’ t-shirts, the hard hat wearing crews watched as construction workers several hundred feet up dangled in climbing harnesses as they added the final stretched fibre-glass mesh cladding to the outer frame. Hull is one of the UK cities bidding to host World Cup games should England’s bid for the 2018 World Cup be successful.

Arthur Bowers, a long time supporter of Hull City FC and Hull & Humber crew member was hugely impressed with what he saw and hoped that it will be England who step off the pitch as semi-final winners when the game is played next summer. Arthur lead his team mates in a few impromptu Mexican Waves much to the amusement of the watching security guards.

One thing that’s certain is the football fans travelling to Cape Town will have an extraordinary experience - the stadium has the ocean on one side, Table Mountain on the other and the lively nightlife at the V&A Waterfront just a few minutes walk away.
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Old November 23rd, 2009, 09:50 AM   #859
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Quote:
Originally Posted by kerouac1848 View Post
Wasn't Bristol promoting itself as the South-West's city? I know it is not in the heart of the SW (i.e. cornwall, devon and somerset), but it is technically part of that region going by the government's official definition of English regions. I think the FA would probably prefer the NE to have 2 venues than the SW simply due to the fact they already have 2 stadiums of high capacity, plus it’s seen as a football 'heartland'. But hey, who knows what goes in within the minds of FA personnel!
i heard something on sky sports that bristol and plymouth competing with each other as host cities. the proposed stadiums were slightly dissapointing, but they would be the smallest anyway so that's not a big deal i guess. otherwise they both look like decent hosts.
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Old November 24th, 2009, 11:50 PM   #860
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Whats happened to all this talk of Twickenham being the 2nd London stadium? was mentioned a few months back but now gone quiet and now seems to be more talk of the Olympic Stadium being chosen instead??
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