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Old November 24th, 2010, 02:16 PM   #1541
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Old November 24th, 2010, 11:40 PM   #1542
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Prince William will spearhead the final stage of England's bid to host the 2018 World Cup, the royal's office formally confirmed Wednesday.

The Prince, president of the Football Association, will form part of a high-powered English delegation which includes Prime Minister David Cameron and football stars such as David Beckham and Gary Lineker.

Prince William will spend his time privately meeting FIFA voters ahead of the vote in Zurich on December 2.

Confirmation of William's participation came as England 2018 board member Sebastian Coe urged the country's delegates to mount a charm offensive in the final week before voting.

Speaking at an event in London, Coe said the 2018 team needed to deluge FIFA members with positive messages about England's bid to minimise the impact of a BBC documentary to be aired next week which is expected to pore over corruption allegations involving FIFA officials.

"You have to focus absolutely on the job at hand," Coe said. "(Outside) noises are not what is going to get you across the line. They're not going to stop you getting across the line.

"It is really a very important discipline in the process of a bid to just simply focus on the messages.

"You deliver those messages right to the moment where there is nowhere else to go and you maintain clear heads," added Coe, who masterminded London's stunning victory to host the 2012 Olympic Games defeating favourites Paris.

England faces stiff competition from Russia as well as joint bids from Spain and Portugal and Holland and Belgium at next Thursday's vote.

http://www.google.com/hostednews/afp...97660b0ca4.411
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Old November 25th, 2010, 02:19 AM   #1543
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Originally Posted by Mo Rush View Post
Must be imaginging the noise on the telly.

There is a bit of singing but to say that English grounds have the best atmospheres is ludicrous. Have a taste of some Turkish "noise".

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fotmpIa0-EQ
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Old November 25th, 2010, 02:36 AM   #1544
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England bid may get extra voter as Oceania consider quick Reynald Temarii replacement

The move may boost England's chances as Oceania has been a major recipient of FA development funding in the last decade, and Temarii was considered sympathetic to the bid before his suspension.

Should he be replaced, the OFC vote in 2022 should go to Australia as the AFC Congress mandated Temarii to back their bid earlier this year.

Temarii was suspended with Nigeria's Amos Adamu for breaches of Fifa rules, reducing the electorate to 22 votes.

As the OFC president has a seat on the Fifa executive committee by right, however, were Temarii to abandon his appeal against the one-year suspension, it would clear they way for his deputy David Chung, of Papua New Guinea, to vote next week.

A special meeting of the OFC executive committee on Saturday will examine if one of its representatives can take Temarii's place, assuming he is willing to suspend his appeal.

"There are some provisions we are looking at to appoint someone in Reynald's place," OFC general secretary Tai Nicholas said on Wednesday. "There are a number of options that are open to us legally. We are exploring those. The objective is to allow the OFC to cast its vote."

The arrival of a new voter will add another variable to a race that is difficult to call.

On Wednesday, the Spain-Portugal bid confirmed that Ronaldo and Iker Casillas will be in Zurich to as part of the official delegation, along with Luis Figo, Fernando Hierro, Emilio Butragueno and Eusebio. The national coaches, Vicente del Bosque and Paulo Bento, will also be supporting the Iberian bid.

They will be up against England's triumvirate of Prince William, David Beckham and David Cameron, who 2018 board member Lord Coe said has already had a big effect on the campaign.

"I know from feedback that he's [Cameron] made a big impression with the engagement that he's had so far in this process.

"And it is very important that the executive committee members of Fifa know that this bid has the full support from the very highest political level in the land."
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Old November 25th, 2010, 02:38 AM   #1545
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Originally Posted by AdidasGazelle View Post
There is a bit of singing but to say that English grounds have the best atmospheres is ludicrous. Have a taste of some Turkish "noise".

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fotmpIa0-EQ
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Old November 25th, 2010, 02:56 AM   #1546
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I don't think you can say that one culture's way of supporting their team is better or worse than another, they're entirely different in very different ways.

The English fervour for chanting etc has dulled somewhat with the increase in price to go see games, the popularity of watching games from home and so forth, however it is still there and an established English trait.

I speak of personal experience, yesterday evening I went to watch my football team play Barnet at their ground. The attendance was 2500, but 1200 of those were for my team and we were in very good voice. We went 1-0 down, but would come from behind to win 2-1, and the atmosphere was electric.

I'm not saying that 1200 Gills fans are going to compete in terms of noise to 10'000 Turkish ultras...but the fact is there is an inherent English excitement in football that when released can be astounding.
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Old November 25th, 2010, 03:44 AM   #1547
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If that is your proof that English stadiums have the best atmosphere then I know you are on a wind-up.

Picture the scene.....Liverpool are playing Fulham at home in the Premier league. The teams are ready to walk onto the pitch and suddenly booming out of the PA system comes Gerry and the pacemakers. When it reaches the chorus the sound cuts and the Kop sings its anthem. It then finishes and we have silence. Followed by silence. More silence. The odd song sung by a couple of thousand Koppites are briefly heard but that is about it. Two minutes to go and the Kop sings its anthem again. Liverpool have played poorly and the score is 0-0 and so it is sung half-heartedly. A few boos ring out at the final whistle. The end.

Anyone who hasn't visited Anfield are told of these urban myths about the mighty Kop and how "amazing" it is. When they finally experience it they are shocked. Shocked at how poor it is nowadays. Even Liverpool fans whinge and moan about the "types" who now sit in the Kop. Compare this with the Kop of old. Nearly 30,000, mainly scousers, swaying and singing in unison and supporting their team for 90 minutes. I visited many times during the 80s with United and I know how hostile and noisy it was. It used to be impressive. The first song sung nowadays by visiting fans is "Where's your famous atmosphere?"

The best grounds today in the Premier league for noise are Spurs and Stoke. Although the atmosphere at Stoke is not as good as their 1st season in the Premier league. The novelty has worn off for them in two years.

The contrast with the atmospheres in Turkey, Poland, Germany and others compared to the middle class "fans" of England are like chalk and cheese.

MysteryMike is not only living in the past but also cloud cuckoo land.
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Old November 25th, 2010, 03:52 AM   #1548
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I don't think you can say that one culture's way of supporting their team is better or worse than another, they're entirely different in very different ways.

The English fervour for chanting etc has dulled somewhat with the increase in price to go see games, the popularity of watching games from home and so forth, however it is still there and an established English trait.

I speak of personal experience, yesterday evening I went to watch my football team play Barnet at their ground. The attendance was 2500, but 1200 of those were for my team and we were in very good voice. We went 1-0 down, but would come from behind to win 2-1, and the atmosphere was electric.

I'm not saying that 1200 Gills fans are going to compete in terms of noise to 10'000 Turkish ultras...but the fact is there is an inherent English excitement in football that when released can be astounding.
I think you would be genuinely surprised at how different foreign fans are to English fans. The ultra scene has never taken off here but the organisation these groups have abroad is on a totally different level. It is a huge part of their lives...not just turning up 2 minutes before kick off and then waiting till the next game and turning up 2 minutes before kick off. For instance, did you see and hear the Bursaspor fans when United played in Turkey a few weeks ago? United were beating them easy and the game was dead for Bursaspor but their fans never shut up. A few United lads I know that were out there said that the United lads gave up trying to be heard with their own songs because there was no sound dip and so they joined in with the Bursaspor songs. That level of support or noise is not heard in England. Anyone who says it is is deluded. Just listen to your average Premier league game on the TV. It is dead.
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Old November 25th, 2010, 03:57 AM   #1549
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Originally Posted by AdidasGazelle View Post
If that is your proof that English stadiums have the best atmosphere then I know you are on a wind-up.

Picture the scene.....Liverpool are playing Fulham at home in the Premier league. The teams are ready to walk onto the pitch and suddenly booming out of the PA system comes Gerry and the pacemakers. When it reaches the chorus the sound cuts and the Kop sings its anthem. It then finishes and we have silence. Followed by silence. More silence. The odd song sung by a couple of thousand Koppites are briefly heard but that is about it. Two minutes to go and the Kop sings its anthem again. Liverpool have played poorly and the score is 0-0 and so it is sung half-heartedly. A few boos ring out at the final whistle. The end.

Anyone who hasn't visited Anfield are told of these urban myths about the mighty Kop and how "amazing" it is. When they finally experience it they are shocked. Shocked at how poor it is nowadays. Even Liverpool fans whinge and moan about the "types" who now sit in the Kop. Compare this with the Kop of old. Nearly 30,000, mainly scousers, swaying and singing in unison and supporting their team for 90 minutes. I visited many times during the 80s with United and I know how hostile and noisy it was. It used to be impressive. The first song sung nowadays by visiting fans is "Where's your famous atmosphere?"

The best grounds today in the Premier league for noise are Spurs and Stoke. Although the atmosphere at Stoke is not as good as their 1st season in the Premier league. The novelty has worn off for them in two years.

The contrast with the atmospheres in Turkey, Poland, Germany and others compared to the middle class "fans" of England are like chalk and cheese.

MysteryMike is not only living in the past but also cloud cuckoo land.
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Originally Posted by AdidasGazelle View Post
Football in England is dead. Middle class families don't create any kind of atmosphere and they wait to be entertained. It is not the game of the working classes anymore.

I'm just glad I was around in the 70s and 80s when football was football, not this horrible sanitised version that SKY money has created.
Yeah good luck to you, it all belong with your racism stories and all what a joke, you tell me that I'm living in the past. What's it like being a pensioner troll? that's fantastic. You must be very proud of yourself
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Old November 25th, 2010, 05:29 AM   #1550
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Yeah good luck to you, it all belong with your racism stories and all what a joke, you tell me that I'm living in the past. What's it like being a pensioner troll? that's fantastic. You must be very proud of yourself
I'm trying to watch the ashes here!

Racism?

I'm not living in the past. You said that the atmospheres in English stadiums are the best. I informed you that they are indeed amongst the worst in the world. The total opposite. The atmosphere used to be decent in English grounds but were never the best in the world. Never. Have a gander at Argentinian crowds. Then have a gander at a new Wembley crowd for an England international. It is embarassing. Hence why I said you were living in cloud cuckoo land.

You also said Stamford Bridge and St James' park were "iconic" stadiums. They were iconic in the North East of England and West London respectively about 50/60 years ago. Outside of those areas they are nothing. Nadda. Hence why I said you were living in the past.

I get the impression you know nothing about football and even less about football outside of the UK. You are a SKY "footie fan". Do you paint your face?

Shit! Pieterson out
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Old November 25th, 2010, 09:55 PM   #1551
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Interesting article on the qatar bid. have a look, but i'm not sure you can see the video if your from out of the uk.
http://news.bbc.co.uk/sport1/hi/football/9224946.stm
By Tim Franks
BBC sports news correspondent

"The thumb-shaped Qatar peninsula," warns the Lonely Planet guide (1st edition, published 2000) "is not exactly one of the world's major tourist destinations."

The chapter on the Qatari capital is even less enticing. "Around the Gulf, Doha has earned the unenviable reputation of being the dullest place on earth."

Ten years on, Qatar has been pricked into the most determined reaction. It has launched an attempt to stage the 2022 World Cup. It is a bid so improbable, it might just come true.

This is a country with a population of little more than a million, promising to fill 50,000-seater stadiums. It is a country of little apparent footballing pedigree, lying 108th in the Fifa rankings. And it is a country where, at the time of year the tournament is held, the weather can touch 50 degrees Celsius. Fifa guidelines hold that any temperature above 32 degrees puts players at "extreme" risk.

Qatar, though, believes it not only has the answers but an irresistible allure. Of that, more later. First, though, to the issue of players, coaches and fans suffering heatstroke by the plane-load.

The bid committee's prize exhibit lies off the E-Ring Road, on the outskirts of Doha.


This being Qatar, a place where money is not so much on tap as sluiced through a vast pipeline, they are not relying solely on child-sized models and whizzy graphics to make their case.

When the suits from the Fifa technical committee came for an inspection in September, they were taken to a 500-seater, five-a-side stadium that had been erected in a matter of weeks, in an attempt to prove that it is possible to play football in Qatar in the summer.

Fifa rules demand that World Cup matches be played under an open roof. Qatar's answer to that is to create a three metre-high bank of cool air in which players can play and spectators can watch.

The source of the air-conditioning can be found in the swathe of desert adjacent to the stadium: a "solar farm", where photovoltaic cells pour energy, year-round, into the national grid and where tubes of water are heated to 200 degrees Celsius, before their energy is alchemised into cooling vast freezer packs that sit under the stadium.

According to Lee Hosking, one of the architects from Arup Associates, the British specialists responsible for the design of the showcase building mentioned above, the process is zero carbon.

"Bring it on," he declaims, as the heat beats down, even on this November morning. "How much energy do you need? We've got it from the sun."

There are some unanswered questions.

For example, what might happen should the wind begin to stir the cool and hot air?

How big an area might you need for the "solar farms" that service the bigger stadiums (the PV cells off the "E" Ring Road take up about twice the area of the prototype stadium)?

And how expensive is it all (the architects were unable to say how much even this small stadium cost to build)?

It's the greatest ability to put the Middle East on a platform and for the world to see it for what it truly is



On the last issue, money does indeed appear to be immaterial. Some might baulk at the increasingly stringent demands that governing bodies such as Fifa or the International Olympic Committee make of any country that has the temerity to offer to stage one of their tournaments.

Oil and gas-rich Qatar, in contrast, appears to be standing, legs astride, mouth grinning, hands beckoning. It is offering to spend £25bn ($40bn) on a rail and metro system to transport fans around the peninsula. It is promising to dismantle its stadiums after the competition and transport them to poorer countries in the region.

All that is, to use the jargon du jour, the "vision".

But Qatar is keen to show that it is a player, even now. Some of these Gulf states prickle with frustration when they are derided as gold-plated baths of bad taste.

Qataris know that respect is earned by more than the size of their shopping malls. Which is why, on the most recent night scheduled for international friendlies, the game between Argentina and Brazil was not held in Buenos Aires or Rio but at the Khalifa stadium in Doha.

Ronaldinho sparkled and Messi ruled, watched by a stadium full of men in their sparkling white dishdashas, adorned with their Brazil or Argentina scarfs.

"We are confident and we shall do it," one beaming fan told me. "Inshallah, we shall bring the World Cup in '22." "Why not?" asked his friend. "Don't worry."

The message was clear: bringing a World Cup to the Middle East might be novel but it is not unimaginable.

At the same time - and at who knows what expense - a four-day conference of international sporting supremos was taking place at the Aspire Sports Academy in Doha.


As Argentine midfielder maestro Ossie Ardiles was giving local children a masterclass on the outdoor pitches, Manchester United boss Sir Alex Ferguson was singing the bid's praises inside the venue. The Scot described the promise to flat-pack the stadiums and deliver them to poorer footballing nations as "a key card" that will "pull the heartstrings of everyone".

In a way, so far, so predictable. All bids, these days, claim that they will provide amazing facilities and an inchoate thing called "legacy".

But Qatar's application goes beyond this. Hassan al Thawadi, the immaculately attired 31 year-old chief executive of the bid, lays down a polite but firm challenge to the conservative men of Fifa.

It is not simply, he says, that Qatar is the "15th safest country in the world - ahead of Switzerland or Singapore". Bringing the World Cup to Qatar will, he says, offer nothing less than an antidote to the toxic clash of civilisations.

"It's the greatest ability to put the Middle East on a platform and for the world to see it for what it truly is," al Thawadi says. "More importantly, it allows the Middle East to interact with the rest of the world, and any misconceptions that people in the Middle East might have about the West can be taken away.

"If there's ever an opportunity to unite everybody towards one goal, then the passion for football and the World Cup is the ultimate tool."

It is vaulting language: to claim a place among those whose mark was felt across east and west - from Alexander the Great, to Suleiman the Magnificent and now, so we are asked to imagine, to Sheikh Hamad bin Khalfia al Thani, Emir of Qatar.

That a country so low in the rankings, so hot and so small, can be one of the favourites to host the second biggest sporting event in the world after the Summer Olympics, rips up conventional wisdom.

But then, travelling the emirate, it is clear that tiny Qatar has a huge sense of itself.

It will find out if that belief is misplaced on 2 December, when it goes up against Japan, the United States, Australia and South Korea for the right to host the 2002 World Cup.
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Old November 26th, 2010, 03:09 AM   #1552
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England bid may get extra voter as Oceania consider quick Reynald Temarii replacement

"
England's going to need every vote it can muster especially with supporters like MiseryMike poisoning every other bid.
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Old November 26th, 2010, 04:17 AM   #1553
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Originally Posted by AdidasGazelle View Post
There is a bit of singing but to say that English grounds have the best atmospheres is ludicrous. Have a taste of some Turkish "noise".

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fotmpIa0-EQ

Fair enough but last I looked Turkey weren't bidding

Its fair to say that England have a great history as far as support goes whether it be football,rugby,cricket.Not every nation has this.Ovbiously the term "crowd control" has had an impact as well,so you are likely to have more atmosphere sometimes where the crowd is less "restrained by authorities"
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Old November 26th, 2010, 04:37 AM   #1554
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Not quite related but with the Ashes on and in the spirit of great touring fans.

"We all shagged kylie and so did my mates.
She moaned and she groaned and she took it up the billabong. We all shagged kylie and so did my mates"
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Old November 26th, 2010, 04:55 AM   #1555
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Classics
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Old November 26th, 2010, 05:06 AM   #1556
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Simply the best, Capello sings praises of England's 2018 World Cup bid



For most managers South Africa 2010 was their last competitive World Cup involvement for four years at least. Not for Fabio Capello. The 64-year-old Italian who manages England is also an ambassador for the countryís bid to win host rights to the 2018 finals.

Why are you backing the England World Cup bid ?

I've worked in three countries - Italy, Spain and England - and I think that the football here is really important. People are so passionate about the game. All the people involved in the bid - the stadiums, the facilities, the training grounds, infrastructure, everything - is top class.

Something else that is really important is security in the stadiums where the stewardsí work is crucial. Also, it helps [with security] that all the clubs own their own stadiums. In Italy all the stadiums are the property of the local authorities and in Spain not all of the stadiums are owned by the clubs, either.

Another thing is that England is a multi-ethnic country and all the countries that play here will find people from their own countries born here. Itís like Italians going to the United States: everyone coming here can find a home from home.

What has surprised you most about England since you've been here? Not just about the football, but living in England, living in London?

London is not England, there is a big difference between the capital and the other cities and other parts of the country. I enjoy the culture here and I enjoy the fact that so many people are so involved with the game. The stadiums are always full and are all-seater which is really important. Another important thing is the respect that you find here among people.

Is England a more tolerant country to live in than Italy?

It is different, the culture is different. People coming here probably find it easier to integrate because the size of a city likes London means they can find similarities with their own countries. Thatís important. Maybe itís because of historical factors, people coming from the Commonwealth and so on.

How was it for you as an Italian living through the 1990 World Cup in your own country?

I was proud of it. The organisation was very good but we had had to build new stadiums and other infrastructure. Here you can find everything already; England is ready to host the World Cup now. In London, you have five stadiums which could be ready now to host the games. Then there are two famous stadiums in Birmingham, in Manchester and in Liverpool. The airports, trains, buses, Tube, are all OK. Thatís important.

Do you know the members of the FIFA executive committee?

I know a lot of people because I started to play professionally when I was 18 and now I am 64. I look forward to meeting them.

What will you tell them next week in Zurich, before the vote on Thursday?

Firstly, that England is the country where football was born. Thatís important. Also they hosted the World Cup only once and a long time ago.

When you decide which country needs to host the World Cup you have to know what the situation is in the country. In this country the situation is very good; you can find everything. Thatís an important message for the people who have to decide. When I met the inspection team at Wembley I told them this. Itís a really fantastic country.

What about the policy of World Cup selection Ė is it more important to go to new countries or stay loyal to the foundation nations?

Sometimes it's about promoting new countries but I also think you have to remember the history of the game. The World Cup in South Africa was really important for the country and for the continent and not just for its football. I think that showed that there are a lot of countries in Africa and other regions who can host the World Cup.

But . . . itís also important to respect history. For example Italy is important because it has won the World Cup four times. But England is the home of football and that deserves to be considered.

It's the best country to host the World Cup. Simple: absolutely the best country to host it.
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Old November 26th, 2010, 05:09 AM   #1557
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ENGLAND'S WORLD CUP BID HOPES GET BIG BOOST




The Oceanic Confederation have lost their vote on Fifa’s Executive *Committee (ExCo) because their *representative *


Reynald Temarii was suspended after getting embroiled in the *cash-for-votes scandal.

But now they are trying to get their place back, which could add another vote for England’s cause.


The Oceanic Confederation have *always been strong supporters of the England bid and before Temarii got involved in the scandal the Three *Lions delegation believed he would vote for their bid.


The Oceanic Executive Committee will meet on Saturday, where they will try to get Temarii to admit his guilt and resign his position.


If that is the case, Fifa have made it clear Oceania can put forward *another representative to stand on ExCo, reinstating their vote. That man is likely to be David Chung, from Papua New Guinea.


And it is widely expected that he would vote for England, which would be a major coup for our bid.


Lord Coe, who masterminded *London’s successful bid for the 2012 *Olympics, has urged the World Cup team to put any possible distractions – like the bribes row – to one side and just concentrate on the job in hand.


Coe, who is also on the 2018 board, said: “You have to focus absolutely on the job at hand.


“(Outside) noises are not what is going to get you across the line.


“It is really a very important *discipline, in the process of a bid, to just simply focus on the messages.


“You deliver those messages right to the moment where there is *nowhere else to go and you main-tain clear heads.”


Coe’s bid to bring the Olympics to London is widely *believed to have been boosted by then Prime Minister Tony Blair’s three days of lobbying IOC members prior to the vote.


It was confirmed yesterday that current PM David Cameron will spend a similar amount of time at FIFA’s headquarters in Zurich ahead of next week’s vote, *something Coe believes could prove decisive.


“I think it’s very important,” said the former Olympic goal medallist.


“I know from feedback that he’s made a big impression with the *engagement that he’s had so far in this process.


“And it is very important that the Executive Committee members of FIFA know that this bid has the full support from the very highest *political level in the land.”


Cameron will eventually be joined in Zurich by Prince William and *David Beckham, and Coe added: “It’s a pretty good triumvirate, isn’t it?”
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Old November 26th, 2010, 05:10 AM   #1558
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Old November 26th, 2010, 05:46 AM   #1559
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Fair enough but last I looked Turkey weren't bidding

Its fair to say that England have a great history as far as support goes whether it be football,rugby,cricket.Not every nation has this.Ovbiously the term "crowd control" has had an impact as well,so you are likely to have more atmosphere sometimes where the crowd is less "restrained by authorities"
England teams in many sports have had great followings over the years, no one is debating that. I did it myself. This MysteryMike kid made the claim that England football stadiums had the best atmospheres. Only someone who is totally clueless, or been watching 'footie' for 3 or 4 years on SKY and listens to what hairy hands says, would make such a statement. The atmospheres in English football grounds in the main are very very poor. The odd 'big' game can be decent but on the whole they are libraries. And it will only get worse. Arsenal will soon be the first, but not the last I'm sure, English club to charge £100 for a 'normal' seat at the Emirates. Not an executive, just a run of the mill seat. That £100 will ensure that no one around you will make any noise so your time will be a pleasant affair.

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Originally Posted by Walbanger View Post
Not quite related but with the Ashes on and in the spirit of great touring fans.

"We all shagged kylie and so did my mates.
She moaned and she groaned and she took it up the billabong. We all shagged kylie and so did my mates"
The Barmy Army are the best fans in cricket but what have they got to do with English football grounds? They are allowed to drink and stand all day if they like so no wonder they have a good time. But even the barmy army are nothing like some foreign football fans.

Try Boca Juniors. I bet they wish they could be like the 'Barmy' army:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BQjeJ2oe30k
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Old November 26th, 2010, 07:45 AM   #1560
Walbanger
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Even in my post I said that is wasn't directly related to the England bid. I wasn't trying to compare cricket fans to those of Soccer. I was merely paying tribute to a bunch of funny bastards from England whom Australia happens to be playing at the moment in a 5 game Test series of Cricket known as "the Ashes". I wouldn't expect people from non cricket nations to know of it or care.
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