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Old August 19th, 2013, 03:43 PM   #341
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Who is the manufacturer of this PRT?
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Old August 21st, 2013, 09:38 AM   #342
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Vectus I believe. ....... prefer it to the Heathrow version too.
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Old August 21st, 2013, 10:05 PM   #343
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Quote:
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Vectus I believe. ....... prefer it to the Heathrow version too.
Does it use third rail or batteries?
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Old August 22nd, 2013, 08:23 AM   #344
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Does it use third rail or batteries?
I think it is linear induction motors..... with batteries as an option or back-up. Try their website.
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Old August 22nd, 2013, 10:35 AM   #345
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Does it use third rail or batteries?
I think it is linear induction motors..... with batteries as an option or back-up. Try their website.
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Old August 23rd, 2013, 03:48 AM   #346
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Here's PRT without the guideway:

http://evworld.com/news.cfm?newsid=31054

Self-driving Electric Shuttle to Get Real World Test in Singapore

French firm develops self-guiding electric passenger shuttle that wirelessly charges itself inductively and can operate autonomously around-the-clock.


Paris-based Induct Technologies recently demonstrated its Navia self-guiding passenger shuttle in Lyon, France. The all-electric vehicle has a top speed of 20 km/h (12.5 mph) and can carry up to 8 passengers along preprogrammed routes.

The golf car like vehicle makes use of laser sensing to track both fixed and moving obstacles with 200 meters of its program track. Passengers use a touch pad in the vehicle to indicate where they wish to go, like a horizontal elevator. Charging of the vehicle's battery is done using wireless inductive technology. The shuttle never has to be plugged in.

According to Induct CEO Pierre Lefèvre, "public transport is not enough on its own. we have to think of ways of getting around that are accessible and near at hand. Being electric, the Navia is silent; it recharges itself unaided at a docking station, and needs no special infrastructure such as rails, so it can work on any kind of site."

The company has demonstrated the system in Lyon, France, as seen in the first video below. It just announced that Nanyang University will run a two year demonstration program in collaboration JTC corporation’s cleantech park along a 2 km route.
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Old June 21st, 2014, 05:38 PM   #347
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Old June 21st, 2014, 05:49 PM   #348
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https://plus.google.com/photos/10336...74076801698481

http://english.visitkorea.or.kr/enu/...sp?cid=1917408

The Suncheon PRT, now renamed the SkyCube finally opened on April 20, 2014. I realize this isn't a true PRT system with only 2 stations but it is a start.

Last edited by lkstrknb; June 22nd, 2014 at 02:34 AM. Reason: spelling
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Old June 21st, 2014, 05:52 PM   #349
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I'm not sure what the future will be like for PRT. I have been very optimistic about PRT especially when the London Heathrow PRT system opened, but I think driverless cars like Google cars may have a better future than PRT on guideways or tracks. Who knows.

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Old June 21st, 2014, 11:00 PM   #350
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Interesting solution...
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Old January 27th, 2015, 03:45 PM   #351
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http://www.bbc.com/autos/story/20140...heathrows-pods

Hands off with Heathrow's autonomous pod cars

Since 2011, on a closed course between the terminal and the Business Car Park, 2.4 miles away, a fleet of 21 diminutive passenger pods have ferried as many as 1,000 passengers each day, quietly logging well more than 1m autonomous miles in the process. It’s a small-scale experiment, commissioned by Heathrow Airport Holdings Limited and built by UK-based Ultra Global PRT (for Personal Rapid Transit), but its success – measured by cost savings, environmental impact and user-friendliness – may help define locomotion in the city of tomorrow.

This is no miniature railway; Ultra pods are real cars, with rubber tires and untethered, battery-driven powertrains. Although they offer space for as many as six people and their luggage, they are compact, measuring 12ft long, 5ft wide and 6ft tall; and lightweight, tipping the scales at just 1,870lbs, including a 141lb battery pack. At its 25mph top speed, the pod draws only 2kW of electricity and hums along at 35dB (quieter than a refrigerator). Pods self-monitor battery level, occasionally excusing themselves at station stops for “opportunity charging”.

The autonomous ULTra pods of London's Heathrow airport
Pods wait in the station at Heathrow's Terminal 5. (Matthew Phenix)

More than a novelty, the Heathrow pod network boasts some impressive environmental claims. The system already meets Kyoto Protocol 2050 projections, delivering a 50% reduction in per-passenger carbon emissions compared with diesel-powered buses and 70% compared with cars. By Heathrow’s estimate, the pods replace some 70,000 bus journeys each year. And unlike a shuttle bus, the average wait time for a pod is less than 10 seconds (80% of passengers have no wait at all).

Operation is splendidly simple. In the station, touch-screens allow riders to select their destination (Heathrow’s system offers only two outbound options). The doors open and a mellifluous recorded voice welcomes the rider and begins narrating the experience. After the passenger presses the “Close doors” and “Start” buttons, the pod autonomously backs out of its parking spot and hums away from the station.

The autonomous ULTra pods of London's Heathrow airport
Pods accommodate as many as six passengers and their luggage; controls couldn't be simpler. (Matthew Phenix)

It’s a five-minute ride from end to end, and the experience is altogether delightful. Crossing over seven roads and two rivers, a journey by Heathrow pod is more like a theme-park ride than a car-park transfer.

Of course, building a closed-course autonomous vehicle is decidedly easier than building one for the open road, à la the Google self-driving car, which must negotiate such obstacles as complex roadway interchanges, pedestrians and non-autonomous vehicles. But simplicity has its advantages. The pods themselves, which use mostly off-the-shelf automotive hardware, have proven highly reliable, and the system’s lightweight infrastructure – slender, easily installed trackways and flyovers – is, says Ultra, between six and 10 times more resource-efficient than typical road or rail systems.

The autonomous ULTra pods of London's Heathrow airport
Pods self-monitor battery status, occasionally excusing themselves at station stops for "opportunity charging". (Matthew Phenix)

And Ultra has big plans for its little pods. Working with investors in India, the company intends to build a 4.8-mile elevated circuit in the city of Amritsar, about 285 miles north of New Delhi. This network will include seven stations and more than 200 pods capable of transporting some 50,000 passengers a day. And in November 2013, Ultra Global PRT and Taiwan-based China Engineering Consultants completed a feasibility study for the implementation of a sprawling PRT system New Taipei City, population 6.9m.

While it is not difficult to imagine specific pod applications – within city centres, for example, or between cities and airports – an all-pod future is a decidedly loftier proposition. A pod network like Heathrow’s works because riders can grab any pod, at any time, with no waiting. And while the service is personal, it isn’t private. The question is, will future drivers be willing relinquish the privilege of owning the cars of their choice – and the freedom of driving those cars themselves – for the convenience of a hands-off motoring future?

The autonomous ULTra pods of London's Heathrow airport
Are you willing to trade car-ownership for a pod future? (Matthew Phenix)

If you would like to comment on this story or anything else you have seen on BBC Autos, head over to our Facebook page or message us on Twitter.
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Old July 29th, 2015, 05:34 PM   #352
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http://www.poughkeepsiejournal.com/s...idea/30089345/

JPods PRT system has a long way to go before implementing a full scale project, but it seems like a good idea. I hope they succeed!
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Old July 29th, 2015, 08:57 PM   #353
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Amritasat Ultra PRT system isn't exactly a novelty... had they started building it?
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Old July 30th, 2015, 03:25 PM   #354
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It appears to be the post-modern mode of transportation.
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Old July 31st, 2015, 06:32 PM   #355
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To me, its the concept itself of PRT that have not so much sense , or better, have a real complex application

- Let's imagine a city where the personal car and mass transport are substituted with a large-scale PRT system

- The load is not balanced (without a strong social revolution) , so we have a large mass of commuters from suburbs to centre in the morning and the reverse in the evening
- The non-commuting people , and the part that use car for work or other reason have a much higher demand of avalaibility (going when one's want) that even taxi services could not cope with.

If the system need to satisfy these exigences , it will be nearly impossible without having an enormous number of PRT "Pods" that most of the time will be parked idly somewhere not different from our cars...
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Old April 25th, 2016, 09:09 PM   #356
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Personal rapid transit (PRT) is being considered for the Greenville-Spartanburg International Airport in South Carolina, USA

http://www.thestate.com/news/busines...e72841297.html


(copied from Woonsocket54)

Last edited by lkstrknb; April 25th, 2016 at 09:15 PM.
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Old April 26th, 2016, 05:48 AM   #357
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Here is a video I shot a few months ago in Abu Dhabi. Masdar City had plans to install this PRT system all over the campus with multiple stations but so far it is just a two station system.
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Old April 26th, 2016, 11:42 AM   #358
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ruston View Post
To me, its the concept itself of PRT that have not so much sense , or better, have a real complex application

- Let's imagine a city where the personal car and mass transport are substituted with a large-scale PRT system

- The load is not balanced (without a strong social revolution) , so we have a large mass of commuters from suburbs to centre in the morning and the reverse in the evening
- The non-commuting people , and the part that use car for work or other reason have a much higher demand of avalaibility (going when one's want) that even taxi services could not cope with.

If the system need to satisfy these exigences , it will be nearly impossible without having an enormous number of PRT "Pods" that most of the time will be parked idly somewhere not different from our cars...
In the not too distant future, we will have a PRT system with battery-powered vehicles operating autonomously on a guideway network that goes to every address. It's called self-driving electric cars operating on public roads.
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