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Old June 17th, 2008, 05:54 AM   #21
Chavito
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Fantastic thread!!!

Do you have any information about lines lenght?

Which lines are double deck?

Thanks
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Old June 17th, 2008, 09:58 AM   #22
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Quote:
Originally Posted by brisbanite View Post
Nice Thread! Good to see some pics and info on the Israeli rail network. Have you got any freight pic's of the network?
Hi,

I don't really know much about the freight lines. Here is what I could find:

This is the network:



I know that if you happen to be on the platform of one of the Tel Aviv passenger stations late in the evening, there is a good chance that you will see a freight train running through it. They do not do this during the day, for obvious reasons.

And here are some pics:





This one was taken (not by me) at Binyamina station:




Last edited by RoadUser; June 17th, 2008 at 10:21 AM.
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Old June 17th, 2008, 10:31 AM   #23
javi itzhak
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train in Tel Aviv

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Old June 17th, 2008, 01:13 PM   #24
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Chavito View Post
Fantastic thread!!!

Do you have any information about lines lenght?

Which lines are double deck?

Thanks
Here are some statistics from Israel Railways site:

Length of track: 975 km.

Gauge: 1,435 mm

Number of passenger stations: 47

No. of freight stations: 30

Number of passenger trains a day: 338

Max. speed: 150 km.

Busiest station: Tel Aviv Central.

I'm not sure what you mean by "Which lines are double deck?"
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Old June 17th, 2008, 11:42 PM   #25
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Double track

Sorry

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Old June 17th, 2008, 11:50 PM   #26
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Those you guys call "Danish IC-3" are actually CAF Serie 594 and they're Spanish, it's just that the Danish Railways, just as Renfe (Spanish Railways) use those in some of their lines.
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Old June 18th, 2008, 01:15 AM   #27
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Originally Posted by ^Anton^ View Post
Those you guys call "Danish IC-3" are actually CAF Serie 594 and they're Spanish, it's just that the Danish Railways, just as Renfe (Spanish Railways) use those in some of their lines.
Actually they are Danish IC3 trains, built by ABB Scania (though some of them were assembled in Israel). The Spanish trains you refer to were developed by CAF several years later than the IC3 but share some of its features, like the rubber diaphragms at the front.
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Old June 18th, 2008, 01:39 AM   #28
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Agggg so confusing, are u sure though? cos the CAF ones are pretty old, they're being replaced in most of the lines for newer versions, also developed by CAF afaik.
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Old June 18th, 2008, 04:57 AM   #29
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Agggg so confusing, are u sure though? cos the CAF ones are pretty old, they're being replaced in most of the lines for newer versions, also developed by CAF afaik.
Yes, I'm sure. The IC3 was developed by ABB in the eighties, and the Israelis got their first trainsets (identical to the former) in 1992. CAF's 594 were built in the late nineties, so I doubt they are pulling them out of service. Maybe you're confusing the 594 series with CAF's older 592 and 593 series.
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Old June 18th, 2008, 01:10 PM   #30
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Chavito View Post


Double track

Sorry

To be honest, I don't know how much of the system is double track and I can't find the answer.

However, Israel Railways new site (in Hebrew) shows that the following track doubling and upgrade projects are currently underway:

Tel Aviv - Kfar Saba (completion Q2 2008)
Kiryat Motzkin - Nahariya (completion Q1 2009)
Lod - Beer Sheva. (completion Q4 2009)

The last one is a major line and the upgrade is a major project which includes more than just doubling the track. I know that the current single track severly limits the number of services that can run to Beer Sheva and also causes delays.
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Old June 19th, 2008, 09:55 AM   #31
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Hi all,

According to the Israeli Tapuz forum, the first six of the new Siemens coaches were unloaded at Ashdod port last night.

They will continue to arrive in batches, with the intention being for the first two trains (20 coaches) to be running in about a month. All in all, the order comprises 80-something coaches, which, I assume, means 8 trains in total.
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Old September 9th, 2008, 09:43 AM   #32
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Hi all,

Some interesting numbers from Israel Railways:

IR carried 3.23 million passengers in August, 15% up on last August.

From Jan 1 to the end of August, ridership was 23.42 million, up 13.5% on last year.

The busiest line in the country is Tel Aviv-Haifa, used by 592,417 passengers in August, followed by Tel Aviv-Ashkelon, which was used by 541,469 passengers.

Overall punctuality in August, defined as when a train reaches its final destination within 5 minutes of its designated time, was 91.46%.

Last edited by RoadUser; September 9th, 2008 at 10:41 AM.
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Old September 10th, 2008, 02:37 PM   #33
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Does anybody have any "hard facts" regarding the plans for a fast train between Tel Aviv and Jerusalem? I know that they've got as far as Modin and that the rest of the line is supposed to follow in 2011. But... plans are one thing, execution is quite another. Last time I visited Jerusalem (in March) my Israeli colleagues were pretty sceptical. They cited, among other things, a strong reluctance on the part of the City of Jerusalem to contemplate a mass emigration of non-Haredi tax payers to Tel Aviv once there is a fast "commuter line".
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Old September 12th, 2008, 11:26 PM   #34
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What about electrification? For such suburban services electrical trains would be much more effective.
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Old September 13th, 2008, 01:03 AM   #35
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Alexriga View Post
What about electrification? For such suburban services electrical trains would be much more effective.
RoadUser wrote "Electrification of part of the the system is planned for the next few years." in the first post.
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Old September 13th, 2008, 09:38 AM   #36
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Quote:
Originally Posted by hans280 View Post
Does anybody have any "hard facts" regarding the plans for a fast train between Tel Aviv and Jerusalem? I know that they've got as far as Modin and that the rest of the line is supposed to follow in 2011. But... plans are one thing, execution is quite another. Last time I visited Jerusalem (in March) my Israeli colleagues were pretty sceptical. They cited, among other things, a strong reluctance on the part of the City of Jerusalem to contemplate a mass emigration of non-Haredi tax payers to Tel Aviv once there is a fast "commuter line".
The first part of the project is finished. It goes past Modiin, approximately to Latrun. The tracks cross Road 3 on the longest bridge in the country, which is 1.2 km long:



This bridge ends at a hill now, and this is where the next stage is supposed to start. The final stage is 30km, of which 20km are tunnels, the longest of which is 11 km. The company that will build this stage has been chosen. but there are delays caused by the project going over budget, as well as, apparently, second thoughts on various technical and environmental issues. The question of what they are going to do with the rocks excavated from 20km of tunnelling also apparently still needs to be answered.

As for electrification: the Jerusalem line is supposed to be the first electric line, and other major lines are supposed to be electrified too. There is some concern at the Ministry of Finance about the cost of electrification, which has led to the formng of a succession of commitees to discuss the issue again (and again).

Last edited by RoadUser; October 6th, 2008 at 12:51 PM.
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Old September 14th, 2008, 06:09 PM   #37
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Hi all,

Israel Railways today ran a double-length, double decker train with two locomotives for the first time:



The train, which can seat 1200 people, is meant to alleviate overcrowding on the busiest lines at the busiest time of the week, which is Sunday morning, mainly due to soldiers returning to their bases after weekend leave. At present the train will run on the Beer Sheva-Nahariya line.

Information and picture from the Calcalist newspaper website.
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Old September 15th, 2008, 02:57 AM   #38
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Reall nice! It's interesting though how the double traction was achieved. Here in Austria usually either both locos are in the front, or one is pulling and one is pushing. Double traction with one loco in the middle is something I have never seen in passenger trains so far, only in cargo trains.

From what I calculated this train must have been approximately 330 meters long. Is that about right? What's the average platform length in israeli trainstations?
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Old September 15th, 2008, 06:27 AM   #39
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Quote:
Originally Posted by rheintram View Post

From what I calculated this train must have been approximately 330 meters long. Is that about right? What's the average platform length in israeli trainstations?
According to the IR website, each double-deck coach is 26.8 m long, and each locomotive is 20.46. That makes nearly 310 meters. Presumably the overall length of the train would be a bit longer than that.

As to average platform length, Tel Aviv Hashalom station has platforms that are slightly too short to accommodate what appears to be a set of 5 IC3s, which should be 294m long. Passengers in the rearmost carriage are told to move forward to get off. Every other station that I know of has long enough platforms for them. Other than that I don't know.
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Old September 15th, 2008, 10:58 AM   #40
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Quote:
Originally Posted by RoadUser View Post
The first part of the project is finished. It goes past Modiin, approximately to Latrun. The tracks cross Road 3 on the longest bridge in the country, which is 1.2 km long.

This bridge ends at a hill now, and this is where the next stage is supposed to start. The final stage is 30km, of which 20km are tunnels, the longest of which is 11 km. The company that will build this stage has been chosen, but there are delays caused by the project going over budget, as well as, apparently, second thoughts as to whether to build single or double tunnels for the tracks.
Many thanks for the explanations and the photo. I was saying to myself - seing how the hills around Jerusalem shoot out of the plains rather than rising slowly - that the Israeli railways would have to build a ramp to dwarf the one at Masada. I see now that they have done so already.

On you second point, I thought some of the tunneling was already done and available as a carcass construction? A friend told me an Italian tunneling team (living in prefabricated barracks, staying away from Israeli society and bringing their own food...) had done so a couple of years ago, but so far the railways have used the tunnel for nothing. Or, is that in your view a canard?
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